Moodle

1. Accessibility statement for Moodle

The Moodle website (https://moodle.city.ac.uk) is a service made available by City, University of London. Moodle is an online learning platform (or virtual learning environment) for staff and students. Lecturers design Moodle content to enhance the student learning experience by providing access to online course materials, activities, assignment submission and communication and collaboration tools.

We want as many people as possible to be able to use Moodle. For example, that means you should be able to:

  • change colours, contrast levels and fonts
  • zoom in up to 300% without the text spilling off the screen
  • navigate most of the website using just a keyboard
  • navigate most of the website using speech recognition software
  • listen to most of the website using a screen reader (including the most recent versions of JAWS, NVDA and VoiceOver)

We’ve also tried to make the website text as simple as possible to understand.

 

1.1 How accessible is Moodle

Our goal is for Moodle to be fully accessible and usable for all users regardless of ability. However the variety of third-party plugins and user-generated content means it is very difficult to maintain a 100% accessible Moodle.

City uses the ‘Atto’ text editor as standard. This has a number of features to encourage accessible content authoring including a limited set of html editing functions (to discourage user-defined html styles), an in-built accessibility checker, a maths equation to text converter and enforced image alt tags.

Moodle forms created with the standard forms library are designed to be accessible.

Moodle contains lots of user files which must be downloaded to be viewed. These are mostly Adobe PDF, Microsoft Word, Excel and Powerpoint formats.

 

1.2 View Moodle your way

1.2.1 Navigating by Screen reader

Moodle officially supports the following screen reader/browser configurations:

  • Microsoft Edge, Jaws 15+ (Latest version recommended)
  • Mozilla Firefox, NVDA 2014.1+ (Latest version recommended)

Other screen readers such as Chromevox, Orato or Orca may work.

Moodle uses breadcrumbs for easy navigation and has skip links for screen readers.

1.2.2 Navigating by Keyboard

It is possible to navigate Moodle and individual course pages using just a keyboard.

 

1.3 Accessibility Support

1.3.1 Support built-in to Moodle

Moodle has built-in support for user-defined content input via the Atto text editor. There is an accessibility checker and a screenreader helper. Guidance is available here: https://sleguidance.atlassian.net/wiki/spaces/Moodle/pages/6651997/Text+Editor

1.3.2 General accessibility support

City has a Learning Support team that provides four specialist services: Disability Support, Neurodiversity Support, Student Counselling & Mental Health Service and Academic Learning Support. These services ensure that all our students can succeed at City.

The Library also offer a range of services for additional needs and assistive technologies.

 

1.4 Accessing Moodle on different devices

Moodle has been designed to be accessible and work effectively on a wide range of devices. You will need a WiFi or internet connection to use Moodle.

Resources to support your use Moodle:

  • My Computer My Way – a website with lots of ways to make devices easier to use
  • MyStudyBar – an all-in-one collection of assistive technology apps for Windows, can be run from a USB stick for PCs where administrator access is required to install software

Further information about technologies that you can use to personalize and improve your experience of this website are available from the Learning Success Module and the Library website.

 

1.5 What to do if you can’t access parts of Moodle

If you need information such as course materials or assessments from Moodle in a different format like accessible PDF, large print, easy read, audio recording or braille please contact your course officer or programme administrator in the first instance.

 

1.6 Reporting accessibility problems in Moodle

We are always looking for ways to improve the accessibility of Moodle. If you find any problems that aren’t listed on this page or you think we’re not meeting accessibility requirements please contact:

IT Self Service / call x8181 / visit an IT Service Desk on campus

For more information about IT Services for students please visit the website listed below.
Student Hub: IT Services

 

1.7 Enforcement Procedure

The Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) is responsible for enforcing the Public Sector Bodies (Websites and Mobile Applications) (No. 2) Accessibility Regulations 2018 (the ‘accessibility regulations’). If you’re not happy with how we respond to your complaint, contact the Equality Advisory and Support Service (EASS).

 

1.8 Contacting us by phone or visiting us in person

To get in touch with someone to discuss accessibility issues for Moodle please contact:

IT Self Service / call x8181 / visit an IT Service Desk on campus

For more information about IT Services for students please visit the website listed below.
Student Hub: IT Services

 

 

2. Technical information about this website’s accessibility

 

City, University of London is committed to making this website accessible, in accordance with the Public Sector Bodies (Websites and Mobile Applications) (No. 2) Accessibility Regulations 2018.

This website is partially compliant with the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines version 2.1 AA standard, due to the non-compliances listed below.

Moodle core code is supplied by moodle.org and programming follows ARIA recommendations to inform assistive technologies. Core developers follow established best practices and new features are thoroughly tested before being released.

Moodle themes using Bootstrap (such as the City theme) do not support accessibility by default. Bootstrap has an “aria” javascript module that adds accessibility to some features such as menus.

City’s own plugins and code modifications are carried out using established best practices and new features are thoroughly tested before being released.

 

2.1 Non-accessible content

Moodle maintains a list of accessibility issues and these are constantly being worked on.

Examples of these issues include using ‘drag and drop’ with a keyboard, using Moodle filepicker with a keyboard, ambiguous or missing labelling of form elements, inconsistent use of header elements, inconsistent behavior of screen reader with error text, navigations missing ARIA labelling, icon contrast too low, keyboard navigation on pages where paginated data are displayed, inability to embed accessibility metadata with rich media etc.

Issues with images and audio/visual content

  • Not all images currently have alternative text
  • Transcripts and captions are not provided with all video content
  • Transcripts and captions are not currently provided with audio/visual feedback on Moodle assignments

Through the provision of workshops and online guidance, LEaD encourage content creators to ensure that newly created multimedia and image content is fully accessible.

2.2 Issues with external files

Much of the content in Moodle modules is in the form of PDFs and MS Office documents that often don’t meet accessibility standards. Issues that we are aware of with external files are:

  • Files may not be structured so that they’re not accessible to a screen reader.
  • Files may not contain navigation aids such as table of contents and links.
  • Alternative text may not be provided for images.
  • Descriptive text may not be provided for complex images such as graphs or flow charts.

Through the provision of workshops and online guidance, LEaD encourage content creators to ensure that newly created PDFs and documents are accessible.

2.3 Issues with images

  • Not all images include alternative text.
  • Not all complex images (graphs and flow charts) contain alternative descriptions.

2.4 Issues with links

  • Some link text doesn’t make sense when read on its own (for example it is titled ‘click here’)
  • Some Moodle activity names are duplicated with a Moodle module which means that they don’t make sense when read on their own (for example, ‘Assignment’)

2.5 Content that’s not within the scope of the accessibility regulations

Much of the content in Moodle from past modules (2018-19 and earlier) is in the form of PDFs and MS Office documents that often don’t meet accessibility standards. For example, they may not be structured so that they’re accessible to a screen reader or may not contain navigation aids such as table of contents and links.

Through the provision of workshops and online guidance, LEaD encourage content creators to ensure that newly created PDFs and documents are accessible.

If you find a document that is not accessible you should speak to the owner or module leader in the first instance about an alternative.

 

 

3. How we tested this website

We regularly use the WAVE accessibility checker on a sample of Moodle module home pages, different activity type pages and a selection of PDF resources. Results are used to improve our theme, submit issues to Moodle if they relate to core code and to inform guidance for staff.

We regularly use assistive technologies such as screen reader on a sample of Moodle module home pages, different activity type pages and a selection of PDF resources. Results are used to improve our theme, submit issues to Moodle if they relate to core code and to inform guidance for staff.

 

 

4. What we’re doing to improve accessibility

  • Through the provision of workshops and online guidance, LEaD encourage content creators to ensure that newly created PDFs and documents are accessible.
  • Investigate the Ally tool to improve the accessibility of Moodle content.
  • We have created a new User tour for staff to highlight the accessibility checker in the Atto Text editor to improve the accessibility of online content.

 

 

 

This statement was prepared on 19th September 2019.
It was last updated on 19th September 2019