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Workshops with leading law firm Herbert Smith Freehills for first year students of all disciplines interested in a career in law – Apply now!

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Takeovers and mergers. Arbitration and litigation. We’ve got it all. And because we’re one of the world’s leading law firms, we also work with some of the biggest international organisations on some of their most ambitious projects.

Find out how you could be a part of it.
It’s never too early to start thinking about becoming a brilliant lawyer. And getting a taste of Herbert Smith Freehills during your first year of study is a great opportunity to find out what you’ll need to do to successfully apply for a vacation scheme or training contract later on.

Each spring, we run two-day workshops at our London office. These are designed to give you an idea of what life at the firm is really like. You’ll hear from leading lawyers, take part in interactive projects, discover the variety of the law we practice, and shadow one of our current trainees.

Applications for our 2017 workshops will open to first year students from any discipline from 1 – 31 January 2017. We screen on a rolling basis so we advise you to get your application in as early as possible.

  • 23 – 24 March 2017
  • 12 – 13 April 2017

In order to apply, you will need to complete our online application form and an online verbal reasoning test. We do not interview for places on the workshop.

We are looking for students who demonstrate a strong academic performance to date and have shown initiative by getting involved in lots of different things at university.

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How to Network Like a Pro

They say, it’s not what you know, it’s who you know.networking-communications-events-pr03534693af2d64e1b49cff00008aa896

Second-year law student Christianah Babajide, interviewed top law students across the country to dig out the best and most effective tips for newbie networkers.

Now, more than ever, you will hear a lot about the importance of “networking.” In other walks of life, networking simply means getting to know people but the meaning weighs heavier for law students. Nowadays, networking can either make or break your legal career.

Networking events usually consists of the attendees networking in a room over lunch or canapes, and demonstrating their commercial awareness, or lack of it, to big-shot City Lawyers.

Whether you like it or not, as law students, you have to network, network and network some more. But If you play your cards right, you can find yourself networking your way to Continue Reading

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Law Student Help are looking for Law Student Volunteers & Student Ambassadors!

Do you want to become a Student Ambassador?
Do you want to Volunteer for an upcoming legal website?
Then Get Involved with Law Student Help!

 Law Student Help is a newly launched website aiming

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The ‘poshness’ test

Earlier in the summer new research from the Social Mobility and Child Poverty commission caused controversy with its ruminations on the proportion of private school educated students finding their way into the “top of the society”. Chiefly by looking at the percentage who find their way into the top echelons of their career sector. That includes looking at job roles like court judges. Whilst there’s nothing the UK likes better than reflecting on class divide in its society, how diverse really is the legal profession in the UK?

What might surprise you is that on both the solicitor and barrister side both the The Bar Standards Board and Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA) have been actively tracking and reporting this information. The Bar Standards Board does so in its yearly “Bar Barometer” report. The SRA goes a step further and in 2011 announced that all firms regulated by the SRA would be required yearly to collect, report and publish workforce diversity data about the diversity make-up of their workforce. When it comes to publishing the data they can choose when during that 12 months and they aren’t required to report sexual orientation, and religion or belief. But all else is there to see.

Would this information influence your shortlist of Firms/Chambers?

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Government Legal Service opportunities (GLS) now open

GLS – Government Legal Service – applications now open

 Applications opened today  for 35 trainee solicitor and pupil barrister places and closes on 31 July. The GLS employs 2000 lawyers  (75% Solicitors and 25% barristers) who advise ministers and colleagues on the legality of proposed policy , create new legislation or represent the govt in high profile litigation cases.The role really suits people  with a keen interest in Politics. The work environment is supportive and collaborative. There are no long  hours and  flexible working hours are in place. Those who  draft  legislation as it goes through parliament feel a sense of uniqueness. Tips for applications: show a strong interest in politics, follow stories in the media and think how legal services can tie in, demonstrate why interested in public law + attend GLS open days. Few in the GLS have trained there, but move into the role later. Warning: competition is very severe. e.g. 3000 previously applied for 20 places.  http://www.gls.gov.uk/

 

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Making the Most of Your Student Guide

A guest blog post from The Lex 100

The internet brings good tidings: you are, at any point, exactly one “How to… law” Google search away from an embarrassment of information riches on how to ground and grow your legal career. To add to that, you can also count on student guides to law for overviews and peer to peer reviews of the training contracts of particular firms.

Because we kphotonow it can be difficult to filter through all the facts and figures that student guides have to offer, we’ve put together a list of five key points we think will help you research even more efficiently:

1)      Says who?  We get everyone’s input when we’re in a spot, but we generally only take advice from people we trust. Conversely, always look into where a guide’s coming from and how it got its information, and make sure that what you’re reading came from sources and through methods you find both convincing and reliable.

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Real stories from real Grant Thornton Trainee solicitors

It’s not just careers services that are aware what a vital tool a blog can be in providing its audience up to date, engaging and meaningful information. Companies are increasingly turning to them too. Take Grant Thornton as an example. They’ve got 9 recent trainees blogging without restraint and with a good degree of frequency. So, if your interests lie on the legal side of things it’s unmissable stuff. Interested in other areas? See if your favourite companies are blogging too and keep an eye on our own blog roll on this site.

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“Essential first year advice” by Chris White of Aspiring Solicitors

My name is Chris White and I am a solicitor at a leading global law firm.

When I started university as a law student 10 years ago(!), I didn’t really know what to expect. I was a “first generation undergraduate” in my family and had no “family contacts” in the legal profession, but I knew I wanted to become a solicitor. However, very early on in my first year I made a huge error, one that nearly prevented me from securing my goal of becoming a solicitor at a leading global law firm.

At a Law Society event, I made the error of listening to a third year law student who told me that first year grades at law school “didn’t count”. This person was on the Committee of the Law Society so I automatically added extra weight to his advice. Looking back at this advice, I can honestly say that it was the worst piece of advice I received throughout my entire 4 year degree course.

Continue Reading