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WHY YOU SHOULD HAVE A PART TIME JOB

Written By: Rabiya Khawaja

Many students experience that strain of finances and lack of time that comes with studying at university. So many have taken up part-time jobs in retail, cafés and other sectors to earn a few extra pounds, but there are many other benefits of taking up a part-time job which can be beneficial in your chosen career.

  1. CUSTOMER SERVICE:

Within one shift you can encounter so many different types of people. Some friendly and polite while others are incredibly testing, you learn to be patient and deal with anything that can be thrown your way. In some circumstances, you need to be sensitive in the manner you approach certain people who may need extra help with finding items or understanding procedures.

  1. WHAT RECRUITERS SEE:

Having part-time jobs shows future employers many positive things. Firstly, you can show you have commitment especially if you have worked for a few years. Having your job and study routine shows that you have a strong commitment to your job as well as your studies.

  1. MONEY!

This is the most obvious benefit of working, being a student is very financially staining from paying bills, rent and travelling. It is nice to have a regular pay check coming in aside from the student finance to help cover basic necessities.

  1. EXPERIENCE:

If you are lucky you can get a job to gain some experience in the field you want to go. This allows you to gain experience and make new connections. While studying you gain practical understating of the work environment and real-life training and an invaluable insight into what your future might be.

  1. BUDGETING:

The financial strain on students can be daunting, but the right attitude to budgeting can help relieve the stress. You can use money from work and student finance to manage your bills and rent as well as leave some over for a night out. Having a job allows you to spend more wisely since you have to work hard to earn it and you can always look forward to your next pay check.

  1. SKILLS: 

ORGANISATIONAL SKILLS: when working alongside studying, you need to be able to organise your time and your work accordingly. This can be difficult as you have different priorities, but you need to manage your time, some people find doing school work on the weekdays and working weekends easier. If you are lucky you may have flexible shifts and a workplace that understands your workload so may be able to offer your hours accordingly

TEAMWORK: you will most likely be working in a team and from this experience, you will be well equipped to deal with a variety of people and personalities.

DEALING WITH PROBLEMS: you may be faced with something unexpected and something you weren’t trained for; these experiences will give the initiative to deal with things that may not go according to plan. They are also good talking points during interviews.

Having a part-time job will expose you to an array of situations and people, you may not have dealt with before. Recruiters will see that you have practical skills in the real world, you learn to interact with people and develop more skills than you could imagine!

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Volunteering with the Citizen Advice Epping Forest District

After spending my first year at university studying law, learning all the theoretical elements and digging my head into the textbooks, I decided to volunteer at the citizen advice bureau to get an understanding of how the law impacts people on a day to day basis. Walking through the corridor on my first day at Citizen Advice, formerly known as the Citizen Advice Bureau. I was greeted with smiling faces. I was introduced to a friendly and caring environment in which all my colleagues were an instrumental factor in helping me settle in.

Citizens Advice thrives on the help of volunteers and the generosity of strangers. Clients come with a whole array of problems including homelessness, mental health issues, benefits and debts. This opportunity has allowed me to see at a practical level how to deal face to face with some very vulnerable clients. Additionally, I have seen how Citizens Advice helps clients on a personal level through the way my supervisor goes to all lengths possible to find the best solutions for her clients. The dedication posed by the volunteers is unmatched and is in many ways very moving.

My main role involves administration work, filing, writing and drafting letters and helping the advisors with anything they may need. Within my fair share of time, I have witnessed many unexpected situations, clients that seem frazzled and confused about the course of action to take as well as annoyed and agitated. I have learned the way to proceed with such clients and trying to calm them down. When such situations arise being able to listen is a key skill while allowing them to explain their problems. However, the most satisfying element of being a volunteer is when you see a client that is joyful and happy after their problems are sorted.

I decided to volunteer as a co-editor of the Bureau Buzz for the Epping district. I was lucky enough to be accepted and worked on my first newsletter in June. My role involves editing the format and layout of the buzz before sending them out to the staff members.

Although our roles individually seem minuscule, when looking at the bigger picture, you realise that all efforts are helping someone else’s life. I may be a volunteer for a short amount of time, but I would love to stay for longer and see many more smiles.

Written By: Rabiya Khawaja

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Jingle Bell Slog: What Uni Students Should Be Thinking About This Holiday

You’re not in Kansas – or kindergarten – anymore. Gone are the days of festive wordsearches and early home-times. And whatever your schoolteachers proffered, you can bet that stern professor isn’t going to be loading Balto into the lecture theatre projector.

But what when the last class shudders to a halt and the mass exodus begins from City campus? Sorry folks; you’re still a full-fledged uni student, and you need to approach your holidays like one.

Here’s what the grown-ups among you should be thinking about this Christmas.

 

Work

Gosh. But it’s Christmas. Right? Nobody works at Christmas.

Tell that to the half million small-to-medium business owners who’ll be working every day this holiday – or the hospitality employees who’ll be averaging five hours sleep. Let’s get one thing straight: being a student is not hard labour, or at least not compared to those who live and work in the real world. So no martyr acts here, please.

Sure, everyone needs a break over Christmas. But if you’re planning on wasting every day on Netflix, you’re making a classic undergrad mistake. In January, the motivated people on your course will return to class with a head start, simply because they could be bothered to do something – anything – over vac. And it’s them, not you, who’ll be scoring Firsts come summer.

It doesn’t matter if it’s an hour a day or six. Over the course of this extensive uni vac, it shouldn’t be hard to save time for your academics.

 

Apply

“Oh my god! I missed the deadline for McKinsey/Lloyds/Lidl last week!” No crap, Columbo. In fact, in all the excitement of presents and trees and reindeer, you probably missed all the others too.

October through December is prime student recruitment time. All the big companies – i.e. the ones you want to work at – use this period to seek out candidates. Looking for a CV-boosting placement this summer? Leave things until January and nobody will want you anymore.

Whether you’re looking for something cool or something well-paid, you’re doing yourself no favours missing these deadlines. Apply, apply, apply – before it’s too late.

 

Self-nurture

Okay, Christmas probably isn’t the time to go on a no-carb diet. But those precious weeks at home may be your perfect chance to make use of the family cross-trainer, or get on top of that sugar addiction, or read that book you’ve been eyeing for ages.

Thinking about starting an exercise regime? Now’s the time. Improved fitness not only affects your physical health but your mental wellbeing – essential in the run-up to exams. Fit individuals also see a hike in cognitive functions and concentration. Or maybe you’d rather learn to cook – a student essential.

Whatever it is, use your Christmas holidays logically. If you can’t find time for personal pursuits now, God knows you won’t back in halls.

 

Think

No, we don’t mean academics.

The sad fact about uni is that it’s finite. In three years/two years/one measly set of six months, you’ll be cast from the warm hearth of full-time education and expected to make your way in the big, wide world. And, whatever it’s taught you, your degree won’t have prepared you for true, working independence. Just ask the 58% of graduates stuck in non-graduate jobs.

Being ready for the world of work is not about good grades. It’s about fostering resilience, developing business naus, managing expectations and understanding office politics. Most of all, it’s about deciding what you want to do with your life – something surprisingly few students have done by the time they graduate.

If you’re in your first couple of years, think about how you can maximise your employability over the next couple of years. If you’re a finalist, use this last pre-finals rest – because we all know Easter will be hairy – to seriously consider your options.

You won’t be a student forever. Plan accordingly. Through the haze of mulled wine and turkey, you can be sure that summer is coming.

 

Inspiring Interns is a graduate recruitment agency which specialises in sourcing candidates for internships and giving out graduate careers advice. To hire graduates or browse graduate jobs London, visit their website.

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How to Network Like a Pro

They say, it’s not what you know, it’s who you know.networking-communications-events-pr03534693af2d64e1b49cff00008aa896

Second-year law student Christianah Babajide, interviewed top law students across the country to dig out the best and most effective tips for newbie networkers.

Now, more than ever, you will hear a lot about the importance of “networking.” In other walks of life, networking simply means getting to know people but the meaning weighs heavier for law students. Nowadays, networking can either make or break your legal career.

Networking events usually consists of the attendees networking in a room over lunch or canapes, and demonstrating their commercial awareness, or lack of it, to big-shot City Lawyers.

Whether you like it or not, as law students, you have to network, network and network some more. But If you play your cards right, you can find yourself networking your way to Continue Reading

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How careers advice and volunteering have developed my skills as an International Politics and Human Rights student

Guest Blog by Ronja KastbergRonja Kastberg 2

MA International Politics and Human Rights

 

My experience with City University’s Careers Service:

The first time I went to City University Career I had no expectations whatsoever. All I knew was that everyone around me seemed to have gotten a lot of work experience during their studies, and with my MA ending soon I felt discouraged and stressed about the fact that I had to compete on the job marked very soon with all these highly qualified people.

After attending the Career workshop on improving my CV and cover letter as advised by the Careers Service, as well as having attended two sessions with a career consultant about what jobs to apply for, I applied for six volunteering positions to help improve my chances of getting a job within my field of study. I got offered all six of them despite that fact that I had close to no work experience. I am now currently working as a research coordinator for Researching Asylum in London and as youth project volunteer and English teacher at the Refugee Council in London.

If it hadn’t been for the advice I received from the Careers Service,  I wouldn’t have had the tools to write a great CV or the confidence to even apply for the jobs that I am currently working in.

I would recommend everyone to go talk to the Careers Service if you are in any way in doubt about your future. They really do help.

 

 

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Guest blog post: 4 extra-curricular activities that employers value

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Guest blog post by Seb Atkinson

From Selesti, Creative Digital Agency http://www.selesti.com/

“Whether you’re approaching the end of your degree or starting a new academic year in September, adding extra-curricular activities to your CV is a great way to stand out when applying for jobs, and give you some great new experiences to talk about in your interview. Below are four examples of some skills that really add value to your CV and can really make a difference to your job applications!

Web skills

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Opportunities for Non-Chinese students in China: with the British Council

British CouncilGeneration UK – China was launched by the British Council in 2013. It aims to help students from the UK boost their employability, enhance their long-term job prospects and develop a global mindset through study and work experience opportunities in China.

Funded Internships

As companies from across the globe engage with China at various levels, work experience in China is increasingly valued by employers. Working in China is a way for students to enhance their cultural awareness and is an excellent investment in their future. Our internships are within a range of different industries across six cities within China and are selected by our two partner companies (InternChina and CRCCAsia), who also guarantee a high level of pastoral care while students are in China. Application is open to

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Get 2 week’s work experience at Santander branch at City

If you would like to get some work experience in a bank, then look no further. Our own Santander branch at City are  offering work experience of up to two weeks to City students who are interested in retail banking or the banking sector in general. The work experience does not have to be for 2 consecutive weeks, but can be scheduled round your studies. It is unpaid.

What would the 2 week Work Skills Programme offer me?

A chance to observe the daily duties of running a retail bank  and to be involved in daily duties of running a retail bank. After the programme you will receive a certificate/reference letter congratulating you on completing your Work Skills programme.

If you are interested in the programme please contact Adam Cheyne at Santander City University Adam.Cheyne@santander.co.uk Ensure your email is professional. Explain why you are interested, what you hope to gain from the experience and outline the skills you could bring. Santander is located at E102, First Floor, Drysdale Building.

Don’t delay as this is on a first come, first served basis, but the opportunity is ongoing.