Top 5 Reasons I Chose the Cass Global MBA

Joining an MBA was not a snap decision.

I’ve been thinking about it for a number of years.  Obviously, I wanted to be associated with a programme that stood out in terms of quality and reputation, and that’s how Cass came into my life. But there’s more, of course! Here are the top reasons why I joined the Cass Global MBA.

1. Delivery

I currently work at Shangri-La Hotels and Resorts, as the Content Management Manager based in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.  I knew I wanted to further my studies and I knew I didn’t want to give up my job, because I have bills to pay!

The blended delivery was really an attractive option because it allows me to juggle between my studies and work.  Another aspect of the programme that I find interesting is the international electives in which students travel to different destinations around the world and get hands-on experience from those unique destinations.

Plus, when I am in the city for the on-campus sessions I can utilise my staff benefit and stay at our London property!

2. Location! Location! Location!

London City

The view from Shangri-La Hotel, At The Shard, London

It’s London! Based in one of the world’s leading financial cities, Cass is perfectly positioned both physically and strategically to provide a top-notch business education. However, it’s not just all work and no play for me. London as a city has given me so many wonderful memories.

I attended my very first concert here at the 02 Brixton Academy to see Amy Winehouse play. I also met my idol Stan Lee here! Now, as I pursue my postgraduate studies, the city continues to provide me with unforgettable experiences which I am sure this programme will do as well.

3. Support

So far, the support has been phenomenal! The academic staff as well as the support team have been receptive to the cohort’s feedback. When I encounter an issue, they are just an email away and will check up on me to ensure I am getting the assistance that I need.

4. Rankings

As mentioned earlier on, I chose Cass because of its reputation. I am officially two months into the programme and I am loving every moment of it! I am learning so much but more importantly, I am able to apply it while at work, which I believe is this programme’s greatest advantage.

5. It’s my birthday!

Birthday

Celebrating my 34th birthday

I wanted to do something significant this year, both personally and professionally, and this felt like it was the best choice. Coincidentally, the first on-campus session fell on the same day as my birthday!

Danny Lau, Global MBA (2022)

Achieving Your Potential Weekend

The first term of the Executive MBA was as expected, busy and full on. Back studying while balancing work and life was a big change, so the Achieving Your Potential (AYP) weekend came at the right point to be able to reflect on the last six months, and take time to understand the direction that the MBA was helping to lead me in.

Organised by Cass Careers and iOpener, AYP is a weekend off site and outside London, giving the whole cohort real space to rediscover goals, to connect them with the learnings from the MBA so far and align them with future ambitions to maximise, as the title suggests, your potential. This is everything and more from what I gained from the weekend.

Coming from a background in luxury fashion product development and production in small-medium size companies, I chose to undertake the MBA to further my career with the goal of being a COO. However, having experienced a lot of change and challenges over the last few years within my roles, I had lost some clarity, especially with the new knowledge and skills I had learnt from the course.

The different elements of the weekend allowed me to process in a way to help strengthen my on-going development and learning, with a better ability to assess the future, where my drive was and what motivated me. Talking through “Strengths”, “The Happiness Model” and “Values and Purpose”, really gave me clarity to help me move forward with my career goals for the future, and while looking at situations through “The Sphere of Control and Influence” it really put things into perspective and gave me an opportunity to look at things from a different angle.

Not all elements were focused on personal insights. Workshops on “Coaching”, allowed me to develop new skills that I will be able to apply right away within my day-to-day, which is invaluable in being able to become a better leader.

The benefit of working with different cohort members was a lovely experience, bonding with people in a new way, and overall bringing the whole class closer together. The support and judgement free set up of AYP, allowed for an openness which helped maximise the most from the weekend.

For me the AYP weekend, was, as simple as it sounds, just what I needed, time to reflect and take solace in where I had been, understand how these plus the MBA are supporting learning experiences to guide you toward the future to achieving your full and true potential.

Victoria Hind, Executive MBA (2021)

Global Women’s Leadership Programme Scholar: You can read her profile here.

Jump into London’s fintech ecosystem with Cass

We have an incredible opportunity to be studying here in London, the financial technology (fintech) capital of the world. Located right in center city, Cass neighbors some of the fastest-growing fintech startups in the market. Our fintech society is a campus group designed to connect Cass students to this fast-moving fintech ecosystem, learn about new trends affecting different fintech verticals, and develop skills to help break into the industry.

As an American moving my life abroad to the UK to study, I experienced so much frustration with traditional banks and financial institutions. Setting up a student bank account wasn’t easy, and transferring my tuition money overseas was nothing short of a nightmare.  What was taking weeks with traditional banks took me about 20 minutes to accomplish with UK fintech firms like Monzo and Transferwise. These personal experiences of startups solving real-life challenges combined with my background in finance spurred my interest in running our Fintech Society.

A few weeks ago we hosted our first event titled “Disruption in Banking: the Future of Finance” at the Cass Bunhill Row campus. The Fintech Society collaborated with the Cass Careers team to set up an incredible panel of fintech experts including:

Eleanor Hasler – VP of Growth & Product Optimisation at Dozens
Martin Griffiths – Head of Fintech at Barclays
Murali Akella – Former Head of Banks at Transferwise
Valentina Kristensen – Director, Growth & Communications at OakNorth
Aaron Block – Project Leader for Fintech Operations at Expand Research, a Boston Consulting Group (BCG) Company

I was a bit nervous hosting a panel in front of over 100 people, but we quickly jumped into a lively and thought-provoking discussion. Our panelists debated what has driven this disruption since the financial crisis, and how in just a few years small, innovative startups have fundamentally changed the way people interact with money. We touched on how large financial institutions are responding with innovation of their own, and how some fintech firms are staying ahead by focusing on profitability instead of just user growth. What really sparked our audience’s interest, however, was an honest discussion about the realities of working for a fintech startup. While the hoodies, bean bags, and office dogs are a plus, these can be challenging and demanding environments that require a broad set of skills.

After some great audience questions, we opened up our event for a fun networking reception with our speakers and other members of the Fintech Society. This gave all of our members an easy way to make real connections and take steps towards breaking into a career in fintech.

For more opportunities like this in 2020, please join the Fintech Society on the Cass Campus Groups website. We plan to host some more great events like this, so be sure to sign up and learn more!

Kyle Griffith, Full-time MBA (2020)

 

How my Executive MBA transformed my career in music

Choosing to study an Executive MBA is uncommon in the entertainment industry.

Having spent the majority of my career working in the music industry, I knew it was not an obvious choice. Working in music requires no formal education and many people simply don’t have one. Many roles within music require little to no specific training, regulations or practices in order to start – some basic industry knowledge, great networking skills and a good ear will get you started. This does, however, provide both a benefit and a hindrance… the benefit being that anyone can be anything, and therefore if you’re intelligent you can get very far very quickly. The hindrance being that occasionally you find yourself working with cowboys and there were many days when I felt I was in the Wild West. All success stories in music involve a certain degree of luck.

Soraya Sobh

I became curious about traditional business theory and desired to broaden my skill-set to see what I might be missing and not much else provides the breadth of learning quite like an MBA. There was a period of about 18 months before I started my MBA, when I tried to tackle problems regarding the business models of artist management agencies and found myself flailing. The music industry is cut-throat, exciting and intense and artist management is as close to the action as possible. I couldn’t understand why the industry was bouncing back, but management companies were starting to shrink and in the last few years I saw many either consolidate or disappear.

However hard I tried I couldn’t find the answers. Having now spent some time learning about business models through our corporate strategy modules, it’s crystal clear why this was happening.

Soraya Sobh and her cohort at a Cass MBA networking event

I’ve found Cass to not only be the most dynamic in terms of the cohort but also the only business school which genuinely asked me what I wanted from the investment. I wasn’t 100% sure what I wanted when I started, I just knew I wanted something different. Studying the Executive MBA provided me with a new way to progress my career. Which, with the help of the Cass careers team I’ve been able to do successfully.

Soraya Sobh at the Women of the Future awards

An Executive MBA is not for the faint of heart, but I can now confidently say it is definitely for the entertainment industry. In fact, if more people in the music industry had an MBA, it might be a very different landscape today.

Soraya Sobh, Executive MBA (2021)

Medical leadership: why I’m studying an Executive MBA as an embryologist

The benefits of studying an Executive MBA as an embryologist 

Studying for an Executive MBA as an embryologist is not very common.

I decided to study the Executive MBA in Dubai  because I noticed a skills gap in my field of work. In the IVF field (in vitro fertilisation), most of upper management do not have a medical background. I strongly feel medical leadership is necessary as it is all about understanding patients’ needs and winning hearts and minds, which is my aspiration.

I also chose to study at Cass for the opportunity for career progression. The IVF market is very competitive and having a managerial role in this field is very challenging as it requires good management and leadership skills. Moreover, a promotion in my current organisation is a great incentive.

In addition, the alternative opportunities that arise from studying an Executive MBA at Cass are a great motivation. The wide knowledge taught by the programme and the problem-solving skills and confidence that I will gain can help me have a more flexible career. I may even consider starting my own business in the future!

Last but not least, building knowledge and personal growth was one of my crucial motivating factors. Having a solid background in IVF, the programme allows me to diversify my skills and build confidence in every element of a business of this field.

Why I chose the Cass EMBA in Dubai and my thoughts on the programme so far

I chose the Cass Executive MBA in Dubai because I believe it is the right course for me: it is a triple-crowned MBA and Cass is ranked very high globally for career progression, which makes it stand out among the majority of business schools. Also, the flexible structure of the programme, as well as the location in Dubai, can allow me to remain in employment while studying.

I am really enjoying the programme so far. The whole Executive MBA is full of networking opportunities, as there is interaction with my cohort, with the faculty, the staff and alumni. Thanks to the focus on teamwork and group work, I have built strong relationships with many members of my cohort. This has not only helped me make more contacts but also many friends from different backgrounds and countries.

The programme adds big value in improving my skills, which helps me a lot in building confidence. I have learned to identify my strengths and weaknesses and build emotional intelligence, which is a key characteristic of a leader.

How I balance work, social life and studies?

Although the demands of the course are high, there are ways to balance work, social life and studies. Time management and discipline are essential and necessary for achieving the right balance. I make sure that I allocate specific time for work, family/friends and studying. I usually make a weekly schedule to prioritise and optimise my time and ensure efficiency.

I avoid wasting my time in activities such as watching television and social media, I ask help from friends and family when needed and I make sure I take care of myself. Focusing while studying is crucial and maintaining a healthy mind and body is essential.

Maria Banti, Executive MBA in Dubai (2021)

 

Facing your fears: What I learned from Cass Innovate 2019

Cass Business School’s yearly flagship event Cass Innovate is attended by entrepreneurs, business owners, finance professionals, consultants and students. Its diverse attendees really shows the living and breathing entrepreneurship ecosystem nurtured by Cass and City, University of London.

The keynote speech by Andrew Lynch, MSc Investment Management (2009) from Huckletree reminded me of the Steve Jobs theory of “connecting the dots.” Jobs’ theory is that it’s only possible to connect the dots looking backwards, so when launching your own venture you must trust your intuition. Andrew’s background and earlier experience in property and finance led him to venture into a business specialising in the coworking space and accelerator Huckletree.

Andrew Lynch: Keynote speaker, CEO of Huckletree and Cass alumnus

The breakout sessions offered at the event were mixed from talks, workshops and panel discussions to serve the need of a wider audience. The workshop The fear of failure: the number 1 enemy was particularly engaging and thought-provoking. The workshop was jam-packed with attendees from various backgrounds seeking an answer to the critical question: “what’s holding you back?”

Delivered by Professor Costas Andriopoulos, we started the workshop by filling in a CV of sorts of our failures. We wrote about what we didn’t get into: job positions, degree programmes, or other failures in life. Initially, I found this exercise counter-intuitive, especially as a CV is all about one’s achievements. The exercise of writing about your failures was a daunting task at first, but at the same time, it also instills the idea of pushing yourself to find alternatives. One more thing I picked up from the session was how to assess the possible negative consequences of an idea through analysis and ranking to explore ways to mitigate it. In fact, this is the first time I ever attended a session on failure and it has changed my mindset on failure and success.

Costas Andriopoulos: The Fear of Failure: the Number 1 Enemy

The session Financing methods throughout a company’s lifecycle, led by Professor Meziane Lasfer, was useful due to its real-world applications to raise the funding your own venture. Professor Lasfer succinctly explained the various methods of raising equity, be it from angel investment, venture capital (VC), private equity, debt and IPO. The session was attended by many budding entrepreneurs, serial entrepreneurs, small business owners as well as investors. Professor Lasfer led the session using the sources of funding used by Amazon as an example. The astonishing journey from launching a company to IPO truly illustrated the need for entrepreneurs and business owners. The Amazon example also provided a glimpse into the profit an investor can make through the different stages of investing in a company.

The final session I attended covered the topic of a Founder exit using research from three studies and was delivered by Professor Vangelis Souitaris and Dr Stefania Zerbinati. I gained insight into the reasons why founders decide to exit– for an example, it may be simply frustration due to lack of power. I learned how founders exit— financial exit, management exit, or simply a combination of two— and what they do afterwards. The most interesting aspect of the session was the opportunity to meet completely different sets of attendees, as many of them have an experience of selling their business in the past.

Overall, the event was well organised and refreshment breaks between sessions gave attendees enough time to connect, re-connect and swap business cards over tea or coffee. There was also plenty of time for networking over wine and nibbles at the end of the day and I look forward to attending Cass Innovate in 2020.

Amit Shah, Modular Executive MBA (2021)

What makes you a social entrepreneur?

The Kenya study tour took us to Nairobi where we were not only introduced to some real-life applications of how technology is being used for social good but also gained a deeper understanding of some of the key drivers of social value creation.

Social value creation starts with the social entrepreneur, an individual who has made the conscious decision to focus more on value creation rather than value capture. A social entrepreneur addresses neglected problems in society, looks for sustainable solutions and operates in areas with underprivileged communities. We met several social entrepreneurs in Nairobi including Martina Taverna from Airfu, a mobile-based learning platform aimed at targeting learners of low-income status who have limited access to training and Erik Hersman, the founder of BRCK, which provides ICT related solutions and network connectivity to areas of Africa that currently have limited or no access.

Erik Hersman runs us through the technology behind BRCK

The second key driver of social value creation is scalability. As the focus of social enterprises is not on driving a profit but creating social value and finding a solution to a problem in society, social entrepreneurs need to seek alternative methods to capture value, otherwise, their solution becomes unscalable. Funding typically comes from public donations, the local government or the private sector. For Kenya, we learnt from the British High Commission that the UK government provides £300 million annually to the country.

Social enterprises must also consider the format of their business model as the traditional model doesn’t account for the focus on social value creation and therefore, needs to be developed. We were provided with a real-life example of business model innovation when we visited E4impact, who have developed a model focused on franchising. This allows them to provide higher-education to social entrepreneurs throughout Sub-Saharan Africa due to their partnerships with several international universities.

A summary of the range of services that E4impact are able to provide

It’s important to note that Kenya is already ahead of other countries in terms of technology use. The introduction of M-Pesa in 2007 revolutionised how Kenyans transacted and allowed them to skip straight to mobile banking, bypassing the traditional banking methods. Even now, Kenya is considered to be one of the top five countries in Africa that will experience significant grown in mobile phone penetration over the next six years; it is predicted to obtain nine million new mobile phone users by 2025.

It is this familiarity with technology that has allowed Kenya to be so receptive to solutions involving it and for this country, accessibility to the technology is imperative to it supporting social value creation. This holds just as much importance on a larger scale when considering how technology could be used to meet the UN’s Sustainable Developmental Goals. The UN already believes that technology will help, specifically stating that, “in order to eradicate poverty and reorient current unsustainable development trajectories over the period 2015 to 2030, affordable technological solutions have to be developed and disseminated widely in the next fifteen years.”

Kenya presents us with an abundance of social entrepreneurs using technology to create social value. Taking into account what they have done and limitations they have faced (e.g. scalability) will allow us to be able to apply their solutions on a global scale and address the challenges that currently present themselves in the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals.

Nil Sangarabalan, Executive MBA (2019)

Finding sustainable solutions through technology in Nairobi

I took part in the Technology for Social Good trip to Nairobi.

Technology provides many opportunities in creating these solutions to sustainability issues. We saw many innovative applications, both improving current solutions and developing and distributing new ones. Technology can be a key enabler in building scale and replication through standardisation, which in turn reduces the cost to provide the product. It can also play a pivotal role in accessing people who would otherwise be hard to reach.

M-Pesa, a phone app for money transfers, financing and micro-financing, is an inspiring example of this. Now, nearly 50% of Kenya’s GDP – of which 35% comes from the informal economy— is transacted on its platform and it has lifted 2% of Kenyan households out of poverty.

Technology can also be used to harness the power of data and analysis, whether it be in providing famers with better information about how and where to use fertiliser (Lentera), allowing micro-insurance to be paid on monthly rather than yearly (Blue Wave), or improving education provision (Whizz).

Technology needs to be carefully chosen to ensure that it maximises impact. Many of the businesses we met were not implementing the latest innovations but deploying clever applications of technology already in existence. As we often heard, it is important to consider the local context when determining the intended impact: start with the problem and find the most effective and cost-efficient technology to provide a solution for maximum impact. As Blue Wave highlighted to us, “innovate simply, and at the point of need.”

I was struck by some of the business models we saw, which play a key role in securing the viability of the companies and creating impact at the same time. Azuri is improving access to electricity by using a market hybrid model and offering payment terms on solar panels, lights and televisions to people too poor to afford the capital expense and factoring the receivables to fund its working capital. This is being operated on a commercial basis, even after receiving only 60c for every dollar’s worth of equipment provided.

These companies started out with a clear social mission and purpose and determined a business model to make it work. There must be a fit between the business model and strategic thinking, and so for those businesses looking for social impact starting with a definition of intended purpose and then innovating around the business model to create a viable business is more likely to be successful. It is unlikely that BRCK’s business model would have maximised the impact opportunity in focusing on value spillover if its only ambition was to provide internet access in Nairobi; it manages to offer free wifi to Kenyans by charging companies for using the data storage attached to the routers. It takes an impact-focused way of thinking to consider growing a viable business whose model is based on forgoing 40% of potential revenues as Azuri does.

Many companies were also using collaborations and partnerships as a growth strategy. This helps address obstacles to transactions by reducing distribution costs, improving access and bundling products to increase willingness to pay. Organisational theorist Henry Chesbrough explained the powerful network benefits of using open innovation for idea generation and go-to-market strategies, and we saw plenty of examples of this in action to maximise the social impact of the companies we met.

Freddie Woolfe, Executive MBA (2020)

Full-time MBA integration week – Block I

86 people. 14 companies. 4 days. 1 final showdown.

What does that line get you thinking? Analysis? Time? Game? Research? Competition? Tension? Whatever you are thinking, you are right.

That represents the stats of our integration week. Block I of our Full-time MBA came to an end on 25th of October 2019 with this incredible week.

The rules were simple:

  • 86 people are split in 14 teams
  • Each team
    • Is assigned a company
    • Analyses the assigned company on three fronts – strategic, financial and organisational behavioural
    • Prepares a 15-minute presentation to answer given questions
    • Answers questions by experts for 10 minutes

And that was probably the greatest catch – the simpler the rules, the wider the scope.

This week taught me importance of:

  1. Precision

When time is scarce, it is important to avoid beating around the bush and boil down the content to what is asked for. Let me try to simplify this by an example:

Question: Tell me who you are and how can you get better at what you are?

Answer #1: “When I was a 3-year-old child, I saw this movie that showcased life of a marathon runner. This inspired me to be a runner myself. I started training pretty early in my life. I used to get up early in the morning every day and go for a run in a park near my home. Sometimes I missed my classes to get better at my running time and speed. But you know, that really did not work out that well. My running times are not that good today, although my stamina and endurance improved over time. Strangely enough, I have been working at it for over 10 years now and I still feel the thrill of running. I have been good at sports all my life. I was even part of my school relay team! I think I should buy a proximity clock. I saw one of those at a store the other day, with a robust terminal, one that’s ISO certified. It also came with a clocking-in machine solution with holiday and sickness calculations. Yeah, I think having one of these will be a good way to improve myself.”

Answer #2: “I am an inspired marathon runner, although my greatest strengths are stamina and endurance, I need to work on my timing – an absolute key for success. A possible solution is to invest in a proximity clock and stop relying on guesswork so that my training is put to a better use.”

Answer #3: “I am runner. I can better myself by buying a proximity clock.”

You want to be Answer #2. First one is unstructured, has a lot of unnecessary information, goes off tangent, and does not correlate. Third one is simple and straight but does not provide a complete picture.

You should be able to balance storytelling and precision. Precision is what your audience is looking for, storytelling is what keeps their attention and binds things together.

  1. Teamwork

I know it is cliché to mention the importance of teamwork. You might ask, am I not ignoring my first rule of being precise? I want to highlight what will happen if team does not work well together:

It is crystal clear that you will end up not being the best. If you do not understand teamwork and do not work well in cohesion, you will:

    • Paint an unprofessional image of not only yourself, but also your teammates
    • End up having an uncomfortable work environment, to the extent that you feel like leaving the room is better than working with people in it
    • May risk your future of being someone nobody wants to work with
    • Feel disengaged, demotivated and burdened your team instead of being part of it

For anyone who is looking out for leadership roles, getting people from different backgrounds to work together efficiently is an immensely important skill. Develop it by using every opportunity provided.

  1. Hard work

There have been plentiful debates and there are roughly three million research journals about smart work vs hard work. From what I witnessed in this one week, given the time crunch, smart work is important. But nothing beats the hard work. The hardest working teams were the ones that won. It is taught to us time and again that “correlation is not causation”. So, this might not be the reason, but it definitely correlates.

 

 

If you want something, you need to work hard to get it. In my experience, there is no substitute for hard work. Yes, smart work complements hard work very well, but does not replace it.

It was a great pleasure to be part of this amazing week. Looking forward to Block II’s integration week.

 

Sushmita “Sushi” Nad, Full-time MBA (2020)

Discovering tech for social good in Nairobi

Life is about choices, which career to pursue, graduate school to join, or elective to select – all to achieve the goals some of us are fortunate to choose to set and attain. An elective Technology for Social Good that took place in Nairobi, the pulsing heart of Kenya is new on the MBA curriculum. We sometimes choose our electives by the expected learning scope, not expecting that we can be the living contributor to the course environment itself.

This exciting elective was a result of an ambitious initiative of Professor Alessandro Giudici, who connected his passion for impact entrepreneurship with enormous academic and hands-on knowledge in Strategy; and a masterful on-the-ground course organization by Koby Cohen, a Cass alumni and entrepreneur, to deliver an interactive full 6-day study tour in Nairobi – one of the most vibrant cities in the East Africa.

Our schedule was packed with site visits to tech hubs and coworking spaces – the thriving centres of social entrepreneurship and innovation spread out across Nairobi. One of them was E4Impact Innovation Hub, an accelerator that has been a nest for impact-driven entrepreneurs in sectors like agritech, social housing, and green energy. All of the startups had incredible community outreach and demonstrated social impact. How astonished we were to know that the hub even hosts Nairobi Space Days!

Kenya is tech-savvy. Today the country is home to more than 200 startups worth of USD1bn. With most of these headquartered in Nairobi, the capital has been unsurprisingly named ‘Silicon Savannah’.

Over the course of the tour, we visited successful startups that have over the past decade shaped Kenya’s innovation landscape – such as M-Pesa, an ultimate leader in mobile payments, BRCK – a revolutionary off-grid internet provider and Ushahidi, a crisis management platform. We learned how these success stories reinvented themselves by supporting the startup ecosystem and reinvesting their gains to support the new generation of leaders and entrepreneurs. My cohort and I were touched by the questions that were asked to us by the 14- and 15-year old students of the M-Pesa Foundation Academy, a state-of-art high school for high-potential young students from underprivileged backgrounds. They were bold and driven; they knew what they wanted and were unafraid to ask us why and how. In reality, we were lucky to meet these future leaders of Kenya.

One of the hubs, iHub, allowed us to attend a live pitching event for startups seeking seed funding. Kenyans and entrepreneurs from other countries presented to investors, often from a webcam! Their ideas were incredible and their pitches focused on how tech can enhance the lives of the communities, to make education, sanitation, health care and light accessible, or how to make farming more efficient.

I found the biggest benefit of the course was the opportunity to meet many young, passionate entrepreneurs who are thriving despite challenges. It was wonderful to witness how a moral choice to address the real needs and determination to find real solutions through application of technology can generate a tremendous impact for thousands, and millions of people.

A visit to Kenya makes you realise one thing – Africa has unlocked your mind and opened your eyes. And all you want is become part of this honourable journey that will change lives.

Anastasiia Liashchenko, Executive MBA in Dubai (2019)

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