Visualise, Hear, Feel

Ever heard of the 60-30-10 rule? No, I am not talking of the classic décor rule. I am talking about the Harvey Coleman model.

According to Harvey Coleman model, performance is just 10% when it comes to career success. Pretty disappointing, isn’t it? After all that hard work you put in to do a good job, and then, a little better.

Well, the good news is that we know what the key is! The large 90% chunk (30% image and 60% exposure), is presentation. Presentation here does not just define a PowerPoint presentation slides you talk though during meetings, it defines YOU. It defines the way you present yourself to others. It defines how engaged you are and how well you project your good work.

Harvery Coleman Model

Harvery Coleman Model

One of many interesting takeaways I have had from presentation sessions at Cass by iOpener is that the abbreviation VHF does not always stand for Very High Frequency, it stands for Visualise, Hear and Feel. These three words define the only three categories of audiences you will come across in any kind of presentation you deliver.

To be an effective presenter, it is important to understand, connect and engage with your audience. To do so, knowing and learning about these three words becomes important.

Visualisea picture is worth a thousand words

From a formal presentation perspective, this means you need to include pictures wherever possible. Although, keep in mind that slides are just an aid and you are the presenter.

From a general presentation perspective, this means the way you stand, walk and use your hands.

  1. Stand – Stand on both legs, roll your shoulders back and keep your hands in Pivotari position.
  2. Walk – Stay grounded. Don’t move around much, this will affect the way you think and projects you as a nervous and confused individual.
  3. Use hands – Free up your hands, let them flow naturally and take the space to convey your message effectively.

Using these techniques adequately projects you as a more confident person.

Hear“The most important thing in communication is hearing what isn’t said.”- Peter F. Drucker.

Throughout evolution, we were designed to hear what is not said; you are conveying a lot more than just your words. The PPPE – pitch, pace, pause, and emphasis tell a lot more than your words do. Be sure to be low and slow most of the time. A slight rush is fine when you are excited about something.

Pausing at right places can create a tremendously different effect on the speech. Often, doing so helps to regain the attention of your audience.

Feel“They may forget what you said; but they will never forget how you made them feel.”- Maya Angelou.

This category is a tricky one. People notice almost everything. Your facial expression, your tone, your body language, and the words you use. If you are saying something that you don’t believe in – trust me, it will come out quite evidently. Practice is the solution here.

As our Leadership Development Specialist Lorraine Vaun-David says, “people who get invited to Ted Talk are great presenters. Even then, each one of them is required to practice at least once with the Presentation Coach a day before they are on stage.”

I hope you found this useful and that next time you present something, you will remember these tips.

the good news is that we know what the key is! The large 90% chunk (30% image and 60% exposure), is presentation.

Sushmita Nad, Full-time MBA (2020)

2 Comments

  1. Nice and interesting post. Follow what is written here, I am sure Presentation will be worth the weight in gold.

  2. Hi Sushmita,
    Read your very informative article on presentation, indeed a different perspective – VHF.
    Felt proud reading it. Some small additions.
    1. Visulaise. Always visulaise yourself presenting.
    2. Hear. The audience in all forms, they are online feedback.
    3. Feel. Same as hear the audience.

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