Category: Dubai Executive MBA

My eye-opening experience on the UAE study tour

I had just dropped off my children at school. Pulling out of the school’s driveway, I took a right turn, abandoning my familiar route to the office. Fifteen years after my first degree, here I was, driving myself to school too. I relocated to Dubai in 2017 as an expat from my home country, Nigeria. Shortly afterwards, I enrolled at Cass Business School for the Executive MBA in Dubai programme.

My cohort recently completed just over one year of “academic workouts”. I have to say, writing exams with a pen after a decade and a half of using computers required “workouts” on a digital level (think finger digits), not to mention juggling work, studies and family commitments.  I was all too glad that the first phase of the MBA was over, and we were moving on to international electives, such as the UAE Study Tour.

Members of the Cass Executive MBA in Dubai cohort on the UAE Study Tour

This elective presented an opportunity to gain practical insights into how businesses operate within the UAE’s cultural, economic and regulatory environment. Being a resident of Dubai, I was quite familiar with the general cultural and regulatory framework. Therefore, I was more interested in learning about the economy of the UAE. The UAE stands shoulder-to-shoulder with the best countries in many aspects, including tourism, security, infrastructure and leadership. I was curious to learn more about how they did it in a relatively short space of time.

Not long after handing over my car to the valet service at the Roda Al Murooj hotel, I bumped into Professors Steve Thomas and Roy Batchelor in the hotel lobby. The duo would chaperon a class of 20 odd MBA students, on an exciting four-day tour of selected parts of the UAE. Rain showers on the first day, a rare occurrence in these parts, set the ambiance for the week, peeling off the rustic silhouette of dust from the surrounding Arabian desert. The first two days were spent gathering first hand insights on the Dubai and Abu Dhabi brands, products of cleverly integrated branding, innovation, marketing, strategy and investment principles.

Memorable stops in Dubai included visits to the Department of Tourism and Commerce Marketing, a digitally advanced city branding and marketing company that promotes and regulates all tourism related activities in Dubai, and the leadership institute/innovation center of Majid Al Futtaim, the leading retail and leisure pioneer across Asia and the Middle East. In Abu Dhabi, First Abu Dhabi bank (FAB), impressed strongly with its Aa3/AA-/AA- credit ratings by Moody’s, S&P and Fitch respectively. We also visited the Emirates Aviation College where I got to play pilot for a few minutes.

Emirates Aviation College.  Inside a simulator

The other two days focused on the Arab consumer, Dubai real estate, and the Islamic economy. The ingenious expansion of Dubai’s coastline, and other man-made land-marks like palm Jumeirah and the world islands left me with zero doubts about the relentless efforts to diversify the economy, creating a model for the region.  It was eye-opening to see how concepts in marketing, big data, economics and strategy were being brought to life at dizzying speeds in virtually all aspects of the economy. Visits to the Dubai Expo 2020 site, Dubai Islamic Economy Development Center (DIEDC), and Dubai International Financial Center (DIFC), made me understand more clearly the role of the government and their plans to remain relevant in all aspects of life and living.

The UAE is definitely a reference point for countries in terms of articulating and actively following a focused development agenda. They are so far on track to meet or exceed the development objectives laid out in the country’s 2021 and 2071 master plan.

The awe-inspiring Abu Dhabi Grand Mosque

Let the transformative Cass Executive MBA journey begin!

I am on my way to the first day of induction for the Cass Executive MBA (“EMBA”) in Dubai at the Dubai International Financial Centre (DIFC). A bit early, I feel – but it’s better than being one second late.

While driving to the DIFC where the classes for the Cass EMBA are delivered, I think of some of my teachers and professors at school and university in Latvia. I guess they would not believe that I am going back to school again.

Having considered an EMBA for the past two years, I felt that the right moment to get myself out of my comfort zone has finally come. After exploring different programmes at various business schools around the world, my choice unsurprisingly fell on Cass Business School: it’s one of the world’s leading business schools with the longstanding reputation of excellence built on its academic heritage and impressive success stories of alumni.

And – luckily for me – the School has a presence in Dubai! It’s hard to believe that six months after attending a Cass networking event, I am officially a Cass EMBA student, rushing to my first day of induction.

Feeling like a curious child and adult at the same time, I am entering the Cass floor at the Academy. The room fills up quickly.

Having never been forced to go to school or university, today feels special to me: I strongly believe that one can close gaps in skills and professional experience efficiently with academic knowledge, especially if it’s gained through the programme like the world’s class EMBA. After the first personal interactions with other students, I conclude that I am not the only one in the room who thinks this way.

Diverse student cohort

The four days of induction passed in the blink of an eye, so will the following two years, we have been told.

Witnessing the remarkable spirit of enthusiasm among my cohort has been really heart-warming. I wonder again about the incredible times I live in: my cohort consists of 39 ambitious professionals from 16 different nationalities who all share a common goal, which is to achieve success. I really enjoyed getting to know each and every one of my classmates and finding out about their careers and what led them to Cass.

At induction, the Cass faculty went above and beyond to make us feel welcome. Each lecture felt like a magnet of an incredible strength that won our attention and drew great interest in no time.

Journey of self-discovery

Together with my peers, we spent a lot of time discussing the importance of teamwork and collaboration. While these are not foreign concepts to any of us in the cohort, we tend to underestimate and forget about them under the growing pressure of daily routine.

Knowing my strengths is great, but admitting my limitations takes me one step closer to the desired success. I believe that the EMBA at Cass will help me understand the correlation of complex business processes and develop strategic and analytical skills.

I am looking forward to the next visit of the Cass Careers and Professional Development team. Their professional advice will help me shape my long-term career goals, steering me towards the right path of my professional life.

After spending four incredible days at the induction, I now know exactly what I want to achieve at Cass! I want to be “a better version of myself”.

Let the transformative journey begin!

Executive MBA in Dubai (2020)

My extraordinary experience on the Cass MBA South Africa elective

When I signed up for the South Africa study tour, led by Professor Cliff Oswick, my decision was based  on feedback from several alumni who had given me glowing reviews about this elective – I knew then that it was an experience I couldn’t miss out on.

Before donning our student hats, a group of us arrived in Johannesburg from Dubai, two days prior to the tour, to get a flavor of, what is arguably South Africa’s most vibrant city. We spent a terrific day in the Pilanesberg National Park and Sun City, we watched the beautiful sunset on our way back and spent the evening exploring the nightlife scene and experiencing local cuisine.

 The study tour

The programme commenced with a tour of the historic township of Soweto. We visited the Hector Pieterson Museum and Nelson Mandela’s old house, a squat, red-brick dwelling that has now been converted to a museum. Mandela’s house brings history to life; every room and every corner tells a story about his struggles and triumphs and how he sacrificed his freedom for the dignity of his people.

As a Palestinian, the struggles of black Africans resonated with those currently living in my hometown of Palestine.

It was overwhelming to be in the house of my idol leader who changed the history of black Africans and inspired the entire country to move from the unjust system of apartheid into a brighter and more peaceful future.

During the remainder of the week, we paid visits to various businesses and not-for-profit organisations in Joburg and Capetown, from educational institutions such as Harambee and the Gordon Institute of Business Science to large corporations like Pick n Pay.

We also met senior executives and truly inspiring speakers who gave us a better understanding of the history of South Africa, its economy, politics, sustainability, business opportunities and challenges.

Two prominent problems were raised in almost every meeting we attended: the state of the educational system and youth unemployment. I have to admit that the commitment displayed by the leaders to tackle those issues was inspiring. It was amazing to see how these leaders have adopted Mandela’s values and ethics in their businesses.

One of the most impressive organisations we visited was Harambee, which means ‘pull together’. As an accelerator designed to tackle youth unemployment, Harambee offers a range of training programmes to provide young people with the necessary practical skills and knowledge to find work opportunities. As part of our tour of Harambee, we were lucky enough to have the opportunity to interview several students.

With big, bright smiles on their faces, the students shared with us their stories, challenges and hopes for the future. Additionally, they shared their views on leadership and the positive impact they would like to have within their society when they eventually get the right work opportunity. Despite the challenges they face on a daily basis, it was incredible to see how determined they are to create better lives for themselves.

Towards the end of the study tour and after a very busy week, we went on a well-deserved boat cruise to soak up the superb views around Table Mountain Bay in Cape Town – it was a wonderful way to end this memorable trip.

I came back from the tour with profound lessons, great memories and new friends. It’s incredible that a study tour in a foreign country can change you in ways you never imagined possible – this is what made the Cass MBA South Africa elective an extraordinary experience.

 

Reem Awad 
Dubai Executive MBA (2018)

A unforgettable week at the Cass London Symposium

As mentioned by Dr Sionade Robinson during her introductory speech, the Cass London Symposium is a “backstage pass” into the dynamic and culturally diverse city of London. It opens the door on the challenges business now face and how they strive to remain competitive, especially with the rise of new technologies and digital transformation.

The theme of this year was truly relevant, Network Effects. By definition [i], it is a phenomenon whereby a product or service gains additional value as more people use it. It also applies to us as individuals, as the more important and diverse our social network is, the more opportunities we can create and the more value we add to our career. The subject was illustrated throughout the week.

London, a city of diversity

Sir Andrew Parmley, late Lord Mayor presented ‘London and Its Wonders’, showcasing how London is the most complex and advanced financial city in the world with more than 250 foreign banks. He also introduced the topic of cybersecurity as a critical and new opportunity to export skills and expertise from London, globally.

London is one of the most ethnically diverse cities in the world with 300 languages spoken in it, the most in Europe. Conscious that this cultural diversity was a significant advantage, Julie Chapelle told us how London & Partners built an international brand for the city to attract tourists, students and investors so that international business and talent remained, despite Brexit.

For its eight million inhabitants, London has one of the biggest public transport systems in the world. Mike Brown from Transport for London took us through its new strategy: to provide more transport, more security and a comfortable and affordable journey.

During the symposium, we travelled around the city using the tube to attend presentations at some of London’s most prestigious sites: British Museum, Royal Institute and the National Gallery at Trafalgar square and we also enjoyed some fine cuisine 😉

Network Effects in the financial sector

Crypto currency or digital currency using cryptography for security is disrupting the financial sector. Olivier Von Ladsberg-Sadie, CEO and founder of BitcoinBro, talked about crypto currency contagion; how good (and bad ideas) spread fast and evolve faster in a decentralised digital economy. The number of users is constantly rising and continues to draw attention to the bitcoin phenomena, subsequently impacting its value.

With regards to equity funding, in order to build a good network of buyers and sellers it is key to develop the most optimal processes, taking into consideration which buyer missed an acquisition and why, which buyer refused a deal and which deal was not closed. Greg Fincke from Equiteq helped illustrate the Network Effect using mergers and acquisitions examples.

James Chew, Global Head, Regulatory Policy at HSBC and Director of BGF, talked about starting a new investment company from scratch which requires building a strong physical network with branches in strategic locations and connecting with a pool of talent.

How the consultancy sector is adapting to new technology trends

From EY to Accenture, giant consultancy firms are adapting their skill set and portfolio of services in order to be sustainable using new technologies. Tasks that used to require significant man power have seen resource reduced significantly since Block Chain, Augmented Reality, the Internet of Things and Big Data have developed. The focus of a consultancy firm has shifted to help businesses stay competitive in a digital world by making use of smart data.

Media and telecommunication transformation

The way people consume TV has changed. According to a recent survey in the UK, most people now watch in their bedrooms, on tablets and in alternative – albeit illegal – ways; apparently the most watched TV episodes are pirated downloads of Game of Thrones.

On our visit to Sky – a leading broadcaster and service provider in the UK – we were shown around by Director of Data Engineering, Oliver Tweedie. He emphasised that to stay relevant in the field, content is the new oil. It has to be innovative and in line with customers’ needs.

Top screening company Netflix understood the game and are developing their own content. They use big data to understand customer preferences and expectations in order to create new programming.

Partnerships are key.  For example, Sky teamed up with Google for their data analytics tools. Other than cyber security, this is an opportune way to learn more about consumer behaviour in order to make more proactive decisions.

Collaboration is key for great leadership

Business and Leadership speaker, Rene Carayol, summarised the essence of the week perfectly with his moving presentation on collaboration. Authentic leaders care about people as well as results and performance. A combination of both is what makes us stronger.

The Cass London Symposium was a magical week. It ended with a closing party at The Ivy Soho Brasserie. This elective is a rare occasion to meet with a number of your London professors and classmates but also to meet new people from MBA teams from partner business schools in Europe and South Africa. We built unforgettable connections and had a lot of fun. The Cass London Symposium is a “must-do” elective which I highly recommended as there is so much to learn and experience.

Joanne Ebata
Dubai Executive MBA (2018)

[i] Wikipedia

Reflections on the Dubai Symposium

The Dubai Symposium, led by the charismatic Professor Roy Batchelor, offered a special experience for Dubai based students to have intimate access to key companies in Dubai and Abu Dhabi.

For London students, the awe of simply being in Dubai was evident, however for someone who has been living and working in the UAE for a number of years, the real attraction was reserved for attending the presentations and discussions. It was a great opportunity to get a better understanding from senior personnel of the dynamics of their operations, from some of the most renowned and diverse companies in the region ranging from real estate giants Nakheel and MAF, to advertising titans J. Walter Thompson to name but a few.

Having worked over the past 10 years for local and regional companies, at the time of the symposium I was preparing to begin a new role at a global corporation. While full of excitement for the new opportunity, I was looking forward to the symposium and the opportunity it presented to visit public and private sector companies, to gauge their responses to key UAE issues such as changing demographics, cultural influences, business targets for the coming year and the impact of the newly implemented VAT as of January 2018.

Some of the public sector companies included Dubai Tourism and Masdar City in Abu Dhabi, a sustainable city which offered us the amazing experience to ride the first automated electric-powered vehicles in the region. During ‘Culture Day’ in Abu Dhabi, we visited the Louvre, with the bonus of a guided tour, to put it simply the art and civilisation museum was simply breathtaking and an educational journey full of history and intrigue.

Another great feature of the visits, was the opportunity to meet Executive MBA alumni who had graduated in Dubai and were experiencing successful careers in companies such as Nakheel, the Dubai Islamic Economy Department and International Humanitarian City.

On the final day we had presentations and were given advice from a number of successful Cass graduate entrepreneurs such as Julian Callanan of Sinterex and Khaled Boudemagh of the Golden Age Institute. They spoke about how the learning experience and network opportunities offered on a Cass MBA helped them in their respective entrepreneurial journeys.

The elective began after our final block core module examinations and despite our sleep deprived states, we were privy to a special experience. For one thing, the range of company visits gave new insights into different sectors. The presentations and Q&A sessions offered the opportunity to establish a real understanding of the mission and values of these organisations and how they do business in Dubai.

I would highly recommend the Dubai Symposium to prospective students considering their elective choices, regardless of where you are based, the elective has a lot to offer.

Adel Ellab
Executive MBA in Dubai (2018)

Exploring emotional intelligence

In business emotional intelligence (EQ) is what separates mediocre business executives from exceptional ones. Cass has found innovative ways to help MBA students better understand the importance of EQ and how to develop it.

Back in November, we were offered this rich experience during our continuous development programme. A full day of live workshop that measured our leadership potential and enlightened us on how to use our emotions to make a significant and positive impact on organisations where we work.

In my whole life, I have always trusted my emotions. I have always believed that by touching emotion you get the best people to deal with you, the best clients to inspire you, the best partners and most honest friends. I was always known among my friends and family as an emotional person, and I spent many years of my life digging deeply to find a way to channel these emotions and make them empower me in my work place,  social life and for my self-understanding. I joined the EMBA programme, which is a life transforming time for me, that’s when I am learning that emotions can be intelligent!

As an MBA student now, I have a great belief in the power of emotions in driving success in someone’s life. I know that emotions are not only to help me feel, but also think and act. The recipe I learnt is to use my emotions to inform my thinking and use my thinking to manage my emotions. But why and how?

Why? To be aware of who you are and what trigger you, to understand others and what triggers them, to excuse them, to manage your stress, to relate to others in any situation, to challenge with confidence, to manage your emotions, to manage people’s emotions, to relax, to succeed and most importantly, to accept who you are and be happy!

How? The first step is awareness. be aware of your own strengths and weaknesses. Many people do not know much about their own selves; some are in denial of their weaknesses, others lack the confidence when they are strong in certain areas! When you are self-aware, you will not let your emotions control you. When you are self-aware, you are more honest with yourself and this will help you to work and improve yourself constantly. Get feedback from people you trust; a colleague, a boss, a friend, a partner or a subordinate. Be authentic and it will pay back!

The second step is managing these emotions. Control your emotions, do not allow your impulses to take control. Imagine yourself leaving your body, witnessing the incident before it happens and anticipating the consequences. I do this very frequently and I am better the more I practice. If you know what triggers you, you will recognise the moment of impulse from the very beginning and then, take control! It’s very effective.

The third step is motivation! do not let any result or reaction hold you back. Always look for a long-term success. Have your own drive because, believe me, no one will motivate you more than yourself. Love what you do and do it with love, because LOVE is the most powerful emotion of all, the most positive, the most empowering, and the most effective life-saving drug. When you do things with love, you do them 100 % and that’s the key of motivation!

The fourth step is empathy! Understand people’s needs, feelings, motives, drivers, and points of view. Many people do not show their real feelings and it’s your job to try to unpack how they really feel. The secret is to stop judging people.  I learnt this the hard way and I guarantee you that it brings a lot of peace into your life when you stop judging others, the way you do not want to be judged!

The last step is social skills! Help others to develop and transfer knowledge, support your subordinates, let them shine, let them find the easy way of doing things, focus on them and communicate more. Tremendous amount of energy will fill your soul once you do that. Nothing can make you happier more than helping others; it pays back very fast.

One technique I learnt to manage my stress is breathing and I have taught it to my kids; a very powerful technique that helps you be more grounded when you are frustrated or having any negative surge of feelings. Breathing is the only vital life process that can be conscious and subconscious at the same time. It’s what connects the body with the soul. Scientist discovered that by breathing consciously (deeply and intuitively) you can bring your emotions in control and immediately change your status to a more positive one.

Every emotion is associated with a certain pattern of breathing. For example, when you are under stress, your breathing becomes shallower and faster – you can witness it. Since you can’t press a button and control your emotions, the best way to do that is to change your breathing pattern. So pause and try to change your breathing, make it deep and long and imagine the air flushing your body parts. When you do this, the negative feelings that you had will change immediately, and you will feel much better in just few minutes. Trust me, I always do that.

Scientists have defined stress as the fluctuation of the mind between the past (when there is guilt, pain or sadness) and the future (when there is worry and fear). Breathing brings you to the now – the only time when you will not be under stress, that’s why it’s called the present.

“It is very important to understand that emotional intelligence is not the opposite of intelligence, it is not the triumph of heart over head – it is the unique intersection of both” – David Caruso

Lawra Hasayen
Dubai Executive MBA (2019)

My first module is just exciting

I have to take a deep breathe as I just started my first module of Accounting & Finance and it has turned out to be beyond my expectations!

We all felt the challenge to deal with numbers and terms that are very new to us but I guess it’s just beyond that.

I really loved the fact that I can now look at the figures in these financial statements from different perspectives. A perspective that is wide and intuitive. Something I found so beneficial and new is being able to understand the soul of a business and link it to it’s strategy.

The workshop was interactive and the approach of Professor Danielle Lyssimachou was just right. I really appreciate the flow of the information and the sequence of going from the basic intuition to the high level goal of the module.

What I need to do now is go ahead and reflect this in my own work and business and to see how I can elevate the performance of the business support division that reports to me. I feel I can adjust many things now; the reports that I generate to management and shareholders will be prepared in a different way that addresses these kinds of stakeholders. Also, I grasped enough knowledge to decide on things or support my boss in providing relevant data to help them make more appropriate decisions.

Moreover, the cohort is so amazing and diverse. We share this experience, we learn how things are happening in different industries and this experience has widened our horizons dramatically from just the first week of work and a single module. This has built up my excitement going forwards.

Another challenge is to work as a team to prepare for the assignment. It’s  not only about the product that we will submit, but more importantly, the way we have to work together and the way to interact as a team. Being a leader or a follower is another behavior that we will learn throughout.  I am learning how to reap the benefits of this opportunity; to build different expertise and skills in different areas, splitting the work in a very efficient way to ultimately arrive at the final best product is something vital for all of us and will add to our experience through the programme.

I’m feeling very positive and confident we will all have a great experience and look forward to enjoying the course ahead.

Lawra Hasayen
Dubai Executive MBA (2019)

 

Getting Disruptive post MBA

Mahmood Jessa started his own business, NgageU whilst studying for his Executive MBA Programme at Cass Business School, Dubai in January 2015. He graduated from the programme with Distinction in May 2016.

On April 17th 2017, his company launched their third digital platform, Name Your Rent; a disruptive digital service which Mahmood describes as “A revolutionary way for renters to find their new home and a powerful platform for Real Estate Agents to serve their clients, smarter.”

The Dubai based business is a story teller & concept builder in the digital and mobile app space with a primary focus on creating customer convenience solutions as well as developing propriety and client commissioned B2B & B2B2C platforms. Mahmood and his co-founder established the business after collaborating on various projects where they realised they held a shared vision of building digital solutions.

Mahmood credits his family’s deep roots in trading, his extensive commercial experience both in the UK & UAE along with the Cass Business School, Dubai’s Executive MBA as a factor in successful launch of Name Your Rent.

 

How would you describe your overall experience of the Cass Executive MBA?

Many people have asked me about the Cass Executive MBA saying that they really want to sign up but don’t have the time. The old adage of we have to make time is so true when you are trying to juggle full time work, a young family, a ‘side hustle’ and an EMBA. The EMBA not only makes you appreciate that time management is a crucial life skill but it also moulds you into a sharper individual and motivates you to achieve your goals. Nothing is more challenging than waking up at 5am to get some background reading done to only have your toddler waddle over, 30 minutes later, to give you a hug and want to play with your laptop!

 

What made the Cass Executive MBA the right choice for you?

Like for many people currently contemplating the Cass Executive MBA there were mixed feelings at the beginning, however, I felt that going back to university, after such a long gap, though daunting would be an exciting & bold challenge. When I originally signed up for the EMBA I had just finished a role as Operations Director and had started new role as Chief Intelligence Officer in the Digital Media business of Dubai Duty Free. It was during my MBA interview that I received my first piece of sterling MBA advice. Having built up a professional network from 12 years of working to suddenly drop off the radar would not be a sensible move and hence I signed up for the executive programme. A decision I certainly don’t regret!

Are there any life lessons you have taken from the experience?

I was in the fortunate position of undertaking 6 electives after completing 12 compulsory core modules and it was a journey which took me across the world, from Dubai to China to London to Chile. The hunger to learn as much as possible brought me in contact with so many different people and ways of doing business, that the EMBA experience is something I recommend on a weekly basis to anyone wanting to achieve anything they have their mind set on. However gruelling it may seem today, taking the bold steps in life pays off handsomely in the future.

Do you still keep in contact with members of your class and what do you think is the value in maintaining those relationships?

I never look at my cohort as a network, they are more than friends, they are my extended family. Many of whom I meet with on a regular basis and am continually doing business with. During the launch of Name Your Rent many of my cohort attended and were my most ardent cheerleaders, a deeply emotionally charged feeling, which I will always cherish.

 

 

 What was the most rewarding aspect of the Cass Executive MBA for you?

Though my original goal had been to pivot my career into the Management Consultancy field given that I had worked in myriad of industries believing that the programme would enable to fill some of the gaps in my business knowledge, the Executive MBA ended up rewarding me in three significant ways:

Firstly; when you’re self-funded you may doubt your ability, however, after being awarded the Entrepreneurship scholarship, that thought was squashed instantly.

Secondly; being given the opportunity to adopt and implement what you have been taught during a class the very next day was an extremely motivating experience. The satisfaction of knowing that you were instantly benefiting from the programme gave me the drive to work harder and see the truly practical side of this education programme.  Learning before was about just passing the exam, whilst the EMBA really helped to shape me.

Thirdly; after all the hard work over the 2 years, attaining a distinction gave me the gusto to believe I can achieve anything if I set my mind to it.

What advice would you give to someone considering to do an Executive MBA at Cass Business School?

When we are at school it is all about our personal results.  When we decide to enter into further education as a mature student and embark on a qualification as challenging and practical the results are not the be all and end all, as the journey is as important if not more so then merely finishing it.

Here are my 3 tips:

Enjoy it – some children today believe that school is boring and they don’t learn anything. Definitely none of us would have reached the places we have if we hadn’t learnt anything.  You’ll meet some amazing people who you are always bouncing ideas off or are able to give you some insight you never thought you would get access to.  You will hear great stories and build a new family. Don’t think of the MBA programme as a networking exercise because then you’ll be bored and tired of the programme by the second weekend!

Share it – the most satisfying aspect of being part of the EMBA programme is your ability to share what you’ve observed and learnt from the Professors, immediately. My kids always say sharing is caring and it’s something I believe whole heartedly especially in respect of education or attained knowledge. Without sharing the knowledge, it is purely information; it is through the sharing that we grow and help others to do so too.

Live it – to really enjoy anything in life you need to have a passion for it and the EMBA is definitely something you must develop a passion for. Don’t read the text book because the Professors said you needed to, read snippets and see how you can empower yourself to better your performance. The EMBA is not just about improving your work life but all aspects of your life. Once you realise that, then you’ll be drawn back into reading the whole text as it will hold deeper meaning for you.

© 2019 The Cass MBA Blog

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑

Skip to toolbar