Tag: London

Choosing the Full-time MBA: Follow your gut instinct

Choosing the right business school for you

Selecting a business school can be a very confusing process.

There are hundreds within the UK and thousands globally. The top schools will teach you marketing, accounting, HR, entrepreneurship and offer a range of exciting elective modules. They’re triple accredited and rank highly in the FT rankings. They will all ensure high percentages of post-degree employability and have notable alumni and promising partnerships among globally renowned firms.

This can make selection of a business school very challenging. To make the best choice, I came up with the following criteria: location, quality, size and gut feeling, all which led me to study the Full-time MBA at the Business School (formerly Cass).

I hope that this account of my selection process and experience with the Business School can help to guide anyone making one of the biggest commitments to change of their professional career.

Peter Walls

Location

The first level of selection was done purely on location.

I started my professional career in London. As such, I am fortunate to find much of my professional and personal support network in a city which is home to a number of globally renowned business schools. This proximity to my ‘nearest and dearest’ made it very challenging to look beyond London.

I attended a number of open days and even interviewed outside of London, however when it came to decisions and prioritisation, the location put the London-based schools leagues ahead.

Prestige, quality and investment

A second challenge was to find a balance between three measures: prestige, quality and investment.

When looking at such a significant investment of time, opportunity cost and— let’s be honest— money, the return on investment was a key consideration. Programmes vary in length, generally one to two years for full time programmes and financial investment.

In addition to the quality of the teaching, the name and prestige of the school play a significant role in the cost.

There are a variety of scholarships, bursaries and financial awards available, so finding those which I qualified for and could feasibly be awarded also had an influence.

My priority at this stage was to ensure the highest possible quality of education and prestige while remaining in the realms of the financially viable.

By this stage I had a shortlist that you could count on one hand and a very challenging decision to make. I applied to all the schools on my shortlist, attended networking events, webinars, open days and interviews. I asked them about their unique selling points.

Size

Cohort sizes are generally between 50 at the smallest size, up to three or four hundred students for some of the larger programmes. Research within my connections and network lead me to favour a smaller programme.

Size helped me to narrow down the shortlist to three schools – each of which with extremely impressive teaching faculty and wider teams. They all had small and intimate cohorts, guaranteeing a personal experience whilst still ensuring a high degree of diversity.

Full-time MBA: Class of 2021

Gut instinct

In the end, the final decision came down to gut instinct and the quality of candidate experience. The Business School team were helpful, supportive, challenging and genuine. They were always quick to respond to queries and offered flexibility in the application timeline.

The open day was remarkably fun, especially the sample lecture which was delivered by the charismatic programme director. Dr Paolo Aversa’s introduction was entertaining, engaging and down to earth. He described the Business School’s Full-time MBA programme as “the Vodka Redbull of MBAs” and one with teamwork and cooperation at its heart, rather than competition, which greatly appealed to me.

The interview process was informed and caring. My final interview was with a senior faculty member, where other schools had me speaking with another member of recruitment. The interviewing Professor offered me invaluable advice on how to choose a school and his inquisitive nature and passion for his subject and education were highly infectious.

The whole application process made me feel highly valued— a person rather than an applicant, and a true asset to the future cohort. All things considered, when waiting for my final offers, during the agonising days of refreshing my email every thirty seconds, I knew that the offer I was truly excited to receive was the offer from the Business School.

Questions to ask yourself

My advice to business school and MBA applicants would be to ask yourself the following questions:

  1. Think about your personal balance of investment, prestige and quality when looking at the schools. Do any of them offer a specialty that resonates with you and your future career goals?
  2. Find potential locations: cities and countries. What about them appeals to you?
  3. Do you want a big, competitive cohort of 300+ or a smaller, collaborative one?
  4. Go with your gut. How do you feel about the interview process? Which school’s email are you waiting for? At this stage, you’ve got to do what feels right to you. 

Welcome!

Peter Walls, Full-time MBA (2021)

Induction Week: Joining the Cass Modular Executive MBA

The induction weekend was a great way to break us into the Modular Executive MBA programme. The study skills session taught us the key principles required for overall success, including speed-reading, mind-mapping and improving memory. We were also granted the opportunity to meet our lecturers through a series of enjoyable interactive induction lectures. There was a clear focus on teamwork and group activities where debriefing and discussing various viewpoints with our cohort was endorsed.

Meeting our cohort was the best part. We have peers from all over the world, with a vast and varied background. Leveraging each other’s experiences and understanding was embedded from day one. I look forward to getting to know everyone better and building a lasting network of highly skilled professionals.

After having our photos taken, meeting our cohort and an intensive day of lectures, we headed to our induction dinner to wind down at the Crypt. Here we met with our mentors and better connected with our teams.

During my application process, I was honoured to be awarded the “Cass Rising Stars Under 30” scholarship. This scholarship was open to candidates exhibiting an outstanding early stage professional track record, showing potential for future success. Being identified as a “Rising Star” is a prestigious award, further motivating me to be the best that I can be.

In these unprecedented times, in the midst of the Covid-19 pandemic, Cass have been quick to meet the learning needs of its students. With additional software and web-based library services being made available, lecturers and support staff are doing their upmost to ensure a smooth transition. Our MBA Course Office Coordinator, Lorraine has been absolutely great, thank you all!

Our first session of web-based learning starts next weekend, wish us luck!

Soroosh Keshtgar, Modular Executive MBA (2022)

Top 5 Reasons I Chose the Cass Global MBA

Joining an MBA was not a snap decision.

I’ve been thinking about it for a number of years.  Obviously, I wanted to be associated with a programme that stood out in terms of quality and reputation, and that’s how Cass came into my life. But there’s more, of course! Here are the top reasons why I joined the Cass Global MBA.

1. Delivery

I currently work at Shangri-La Hotels and Resorts, as the Content Management Manager based in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.  I knew I wanted to further my studies and I knew I didn’t want to give up my job, because I have bills to pay!

The blended delivery was really an attractive option because it allows me to juggle between my studies and work.  Another aspect of the programme that I find interesting is the international electives in which students travel to different destinations around the world and get hands-on experience from those unique destinations.

Plus, when I am in the city for the on-campus sessions I can utilise my staff benefit and stay at our London property!

2. Location! Location! Location!

London City

The view from Shangri-La Hotel, At The Shard, London

It’s London! Based in one of the world’s leading financial cities, Cass is perfectly positioned both physically and strategically to provide a top-notch business education. However, it’s not just all work and no play for me. London as a city has given me so many wonderful memories.

I attended my very first concert here at the 02 Brixton Academy to see Amy Winehouse play. I also met my idol Stan Lee here! Now, as I pursue my postgraduate studies, the city continues to provide me with unforgettable experiences which I am sure this programme will do as well.

3. Support

So far, the support has been phenomenal! The academic staff as well as the support team have been receptive to the cohort’s feedback. When I encounter an issue, they are just an email away and will check up on me to ensure I am getting the assistance that I need.

4. Rankings

As mentioned earlier on, I chose Cass because of its reputation. I am officially two months into the programme and I am loving every moment of it! I am learning so much but more importantly, I am able to apply it while at work, which I believe is this programme’s greatest advantage.

5. It’s my birthday!

Birthday

Celebrating my 34th birthday

I wanted to do something significant this year, both personally and professionally, and this felt like it was the best choice. Coincidentally, the first on-campus session fell on the same day as my birthday!

Danny Lau, Global MBA (2022)

Breaking the Social Class Barrier

Holding an Economics degree from City, my interests have always been skewed toward quantitative subjects. I was anxious to start my EMBA core modules on topics such as Organisational Behaviour. Little did I know that I would learn the mathematical formula that I now use to explain my ambitions during these lessons. In a simplified form, Vroom’s Expectancy Theory of Motivation states that an individual’s drive to pursue a goal is a function of two variables: 1) the strength of her or his desire to fulfil that goal, and 2) the probability that it will actually happen. It looks like this:

Another subject that wasn’t previously on my radar was our module on Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), but my interest in the topic has flourished. For our CSR coursework, we were asked to analyse BlackRock Chairman and CEO Larry Fink’s annual letter to S&P 500 CEOs. In his 2018 letter, Mr Fink called on companies to take a more active role in addressing societal issues and also emphasised the importance of a diverse board.

This prompted me to browse the C-suite composition of the largest banking institutions in the world. I found that banks continue to make progress on diversity of gender, ethnicity, industry experience, and country of origin. When taking a closer look at the early life and education of randomly picked board members, a pattern emerged. Despite the characteristics that make them unique as individuals, most appeared to have privileged backgrounds that led them to receive similar education. How could they possibly not surrender to group think if they attended the same handful of universities and grew up within the same networks?

The reality is that social class is the ultimate barrier to break and that has nothing to do with gender or nationality. The probability component of Vroom’s formula is important in determining people’s motivation to pursue certain careers. Wealthy people with good contacts will have a greater probability to be successful, hence they tend to be highly motivated individuals.

Natalia Lopez

I cannot remember my childhood friends and I dreaming of going to university let alone becoming a chairperson, or a CEO. That is because, just like thousands of teenagers today in Britain, we had zero perceived probability to achieve these goals. Sadly, society labelled us as lazy but we were just a demotivated bunch of youngsters.

With an extraordinary influence on our global economic and political system, financial institutions are increasingly becoming a dominant force directing the world. How can they take decisions that are in the best interest of people if their boardrooms understanding of society’s struggles comes from an economics textbook?

In my opinion, a truly diverse team is one that is made of different social classes and this is something most corporations are getting wrong. Luckily, the desire component of my Vroom’s formula is bigger than a mountain for which I am highly motivated to achieve my goals. We need to show people like my younger self that it is possible to make their dreams come true. This is not just because equal opportunity is a hardly debatable subject but because, without them, the world is missing out.

Natalia Lopez, Executive MBA 2020

A unforgettable week at the Cass London Symposium

As mentioned by Dr Sionade Robinson during her introductory speech, the Cass London Symposium is a “backstage pass” into the dynamic and culturally diverse city of London. It opens the door on the challenges business now face and how they strive to remain competitive, especially with the rise of new technologies and digital transformation.

The theme of this year was truly relevant, Network Effects. By definition [i], it is a phenomenon whereby a product or service gains additional value as more people use it. It also applies to us as individuals, as the more important and diverse our social network is, the more opportunities we can create and the more value we add to our career. The subject was illustrated throughout the week.

London, a city of diversity

Sir Andrew Parmley, late Lord Mayor presented ‘London and Its Wonders’, showcasing how London is the most complex and advanced financial city in the world with more than 250 foreign banks. He also introduced the topic of cybersecurity as a critical and new opportunity to export skills and expertise from London, globally.

London is one of the most ethnically diverse cities in the world with 300 languages spoken in it, the most in Europe. Conscious that this cultural diversity was a significant advantage, Julie Chapelle told us how London & Partners built an international brand for the city to attract tourists, students and investors so that international business and talent remained, despite Brexit.

For its eight million inhabitants, London has one of the biggest public transport systems in the world. Mike Brown from Transport for London took us through its new strategy: to provide more transport, more security and a comfortable and affordable journey.

During the symposium, we travelled around the city using the tube to attend presentations at some of London’s most prestigious sites: British Museum, Royal Institute and the National Gallery at Trafalgar square and we also enjoyed some fine cuisine 😉

Network Effects in the financial sector

Crypto currency or digital currency using cryptography for security is disrupting the financial sector. Olivier Von Ladsberg-Sadie, CEO and founder of BitcoinBro, talked about crypto currency contagion; how good (and bad ideas) spread fast and evolve faster in a decentralised digital economy. The number of users is constantly rising and continues to draw attention to the bitcoin phenomena, subsequently impacting its value.

With regards to equity funding, in order to build a good network of buyers and sellers it is key to develop the most optimal processes, taking into consideration which buyer missed an acquisition and why, which buyer refused a deal and which deal was not closed. Greg Fincke from Equiteq helped illustrate the Network Effect using mergers and acquisitions examples.

James Chew, Global Head, Regulatory Policy at HSBC and Director of BGF, talked about starting a new investment company from scratch which requires building a strong physical network with branches in strategic locations and connecting with a pool of talent.

How the consultancy sector is adapting to new technology trends

From EY to Accenture, giant consultancy firms are adapting their skill set and portfolio of services in order to be sustainable using new technologies. Tasks that used to require significant man power have seen resource reduced significantly since Block Chain, Augmented Reality, the Internet of Things and Big Data have developed. The focus of a consultancy firm has shifted to help businesses stay competitive in a digital world by making use of smart data.

Media and telecommunication transformation

The way people consume TV has changed. According to a recent survey in the UK, most people now watch in their bedrooms, on tablets and in alternative – albeit illegal – ways; apparently the most watched TV episodes are pirated downloads of Game of Thrones.

On our visit to Sky – a leading broadcaster and service provider in the UK – we were shown around by Director of Data Engineering, Oliver Tweedie. He emphasised that to stay relevant in the field, content is the new oil. It has to be innovative and in line with customers’ needs.

Top screening company Netflix understood the game and are developing their own content. They use big data to understand customer preferences and expectations in order to create new programming.

Partnerships are key.  For example, Sky teamed up with Google for their data analytics tools. Other than cyber security, this is an opportune way to learn more about consumer behaviour in order to make more proactive decisions.

Collaboration is key for great leadership

Business and Leadership speaker, Rene Carayol, summarised the essence of the week perfectly with his moving presentation on collaboration. Authentic leaders care about people as well as results and performance. A combination of both is what makes us stronger.

The Cass London Symposium was a magical week. It ended with a closing party at The Ivy Soho Brasserie. This elective is a rare occasion to meet with a number of your London professors and classmates but also to meet new people from MBA teams from partner business schools in Europe and South Africa. We built unforgettable connections and had a lot of fun. The Cass London Symposium is a “must-do” elective which I highly recommended as there is so much to learn and experience.

Joanne Ebata
Dubai Executive MBA (2018)

[i] Wikipedia

Our guide to improving your MBA scholarship application

We understand that deciding to do an MBA is a huge investment. Not only with your time, but also financially and for many, the dream to pursue an MBA depends upon monetary support. At Cass, we are proud to offer scholarships of 50% for our Full-time and Executive MBA programmes, for strong candidates who demonstrate excellence in their field of work, diversity and a commitment to the MBA.

It is important to note that the scholarship process is an extremely competitive one and to succeed, your application must be carefully planned and thought out. See my expert tips to success below, to ensure your application stands out from the crowd;

 

1. Be an early bird

To be considered for a scholarship at Cass, you must have submitted a full and complete application for the MBA programme of your choice. A completed application includes your references, so it pays to be organised and to leave yourself enough time to plan ahead. If you are applying for the Full-time MBA, you must also have your GMAT score (and IELTS if a Tier 4 visa is required) by the deadline. As scholarship funds are limited and competition is high, being prepared is paramount to your success and submitting your application as early as possible will give you the best chance of securing a scholarship at Cass.

2. Develop your strategy
I really can’t stress this point enough and is something that many will neglect when looking to apply. Having a well thought out plan can be the difference between a successful or unsuccessful scholarship application. While we have a diverse range of scholarships available, you are only able to apply for a maximum of three. It is also important to remember here, that you will only be awarded one of the three scholarships you have applied for. If successful, we will award the scholarship we consider most suited to you.

When choosing the three scholarships you are applying for, look for the ones that best fit your background and expertise. Being strategic with your scholarship application will increase your chance of success.

3. Sell yourself

Sell your experience to us. This is your chance to shine and to show us why you are the best candidate for a scholarship at Cass. Remember that you will be facing competition from people in your industry and with similar backgrounds, so it is imperative to stand out from the crowd. Think about what makes your profile unique, have you excelled academically or professionally? Also, what gives you the competitive edge over someone else? It also helps to do your homework about the programme, to understand what you can bring to Cass and why you would be a good ambassador for us during and after completion of your MBA.

4. Do your research
As a Recruitment Manager for the FTMBA and EMBA programmes, I am here to help you manage the application process and offer advice and guidance. If you haven’t already done so, I would strongly recommend you to arrange a one to one with me or with one of my colleagues before you submit your application. This can be perhaps the most significant, but overlooked step in the process. We are here to guide you in the right direction, so get in touch today and we look forward to steering you towards scholarship success.

 

We are currently accepting scholarship applications for our Full time and Executive MBA programme. Full time MBA Scholarships  will remain open until the 17th April, while scholarship applications for the Executive MBA programme have a deadline of 8th May.


 

Ana Quinas, Full-Time MBA Recruitment Manager
cassmbalondon.com

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