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2016 Research Round-Up

Cass Business School News, City News, Health Sciences News, Law News, Mathematics, Computer Science & Engineering News.

City, University of London produces high quality research on an incredibly broad range of topics. We have put together a quick overview of some of the top research stories from the Insitution in 2016. For all the latest news please go to the Research homepage.

Inspired by Airbnb

airbnb sign

We all know when a new business comes along and disrupts the status quo, but how do they do it? Cass PhD student Tatiana Mikhalkina and Professor Laure Cabantous have had their research “How do innovative business models become the exemplars for a new category of firm?” published in Business Model Innovation: How Iconic Business Models Emerge. This explores how a new company emerges and the power of iconic business models. Read article.

More excuses to keep playing video games

ps3 controller

Stop feeling guilty about how much time you spend with your PS4 or Xbox. Dr Irene Scopelliti from Cass Business School has published research on decision-making bias and the use of video games. The paper, published in Policy Insights in the Behavioral and Brain Sciences, explored ways to improve upon traditional methods of training designed to reduce bias and improve people’s decision-making ability. The research team developed two interactive computer games to test whether they might substantially reduce game players’ susceptibility to cognitive biases. Full text.

Online dating in The Independent

man with smartphone

The saying goes “there’s plenty of fish in the sea” – but what if the fish send you unwanted explicit messages? Laura Thompson, a PhD student from the Centre for Law, Justice and Journalism, tackles just that and has had her research published in The Independent. The feature explores the issue of why some people choose to send graphic images to other website users without consent and looks at how different genders interact on dating websites and how this links to offensive or insulting behaviour. More details.

A better measure of obesity?

waist measuring

If you’ve ever worried about your BMI, it’s time to give that up and measure your waist-to-height (WHtR) instead. Dr Margaret Ashwell, Senior Visiting Fellow at Cass Business School and her colleague Sigrid Gibson, have proposed this new measure in BMJ Open. The research found that 35% of adults judged to be OK using the current measure were found to have higher levels of some cardio metabolic risk factors when using the waist-to-height ratio (WHtR). These risk factors can be early indicators of health problems including diabetes, heart disease or stroke. Full information

Cancer costs keep adding up even after a decade

operating theatre

The cost of cancer treatment on the NHS is a hot topic, and new research from Dr Mauro Laudicella and Dr Brendan Walsh at City, University of London shows that even a decade on, cancer survivors cost the NHS in England five times more than someone without the disease. This study was commissioned by Macmillan Cancer Support and published in the British Journal of Cancer and it reveals that hospital care for the average patient diagnosed with the four most common cancers (breast, colorectal, prostate or lung cancer) costs the NHS in England £10,000 in their first year of diagnosis – but nine years on is still costing £2,000 a year. Academics from Imperial College London also contributed to the report. Continue reading.

UK creativity on the up

coloured lights

If you’re looking to get in to the creative industries, the UK outperforms the US and Canada. Professor Andy Pratt, Director of the Centre for Culture and the Creative Industries at City, University of London, was part of the team behind a report for the charity Nesta titled “Creative Economy Employment in the US, Canada and the UK”. The research showed that employment in the UK creative economy grew at 4.7 per cent per annum on average, between 2011 and 2013 – faster than the US (3.1 per cent). Read on.

High praise for gender balance research

panel

Leading figures from the BBC, Sky, Channel 4, ITV and Channel 5 joined politicians in praising City research into gender imbalance on the country’s top news programmes. Professor Lis Howell is running an ongoing study of the proportion of women experts, reporters and presenters in news programmes. This issue was discussed at the Women on Air conference, which highlighted the lack of women on television and the radio. More here.

Augmented reality

computer simulated augmented reality

Augmented reality can now help you choose wine by overlaying information on the bottle, and is opening the door for brand new ways to enhance online shopping. Professor Ko de Ruyter, Professor of Marketing at Cass Business School, said, “Companies such as IKEA, L’Oreal, and BMW have already added AR applications to their frontline service delivery.” The team’s research shows that adding AR into retail systems could reverse deep-rooted consumer dynamics and helps the customer to make choices that are more consistent with their personal goals. Fast-forward to the future.

Taking your phone to bed causes harmless blindness

man in bed with phone

Have you experienced that temporary blindness from spending too much time using smartphones in bed? A new study by academics from City University London, Moorfields Eye Hospital, King’s College London, and the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, seeks to raise awareness for physicians and reduce costly investigations, while also reassuring patients. Although ‘temporary blindness’ sounds alarming, the experience is completely harmless, and not confined to smartphone use, but due to the wide use of smartphones in bed, has been most commonly observed in connection with them. Read on.

Malnutrition and obesity on the rise

apple with world map

The 2016 Global Nutrition Report was Co-Chaired by Professor Corinna Hawkes of the Centre for Food Policy at City, University of London, and it reveals insufficient progress in the fight against all forms of malnutrition. Forty Four per cent of countries with data available (57 out of 129 countries) now experience very serious levels of undernutrition as well as overweight and obese adults. Despite good progress in some countries, the world is off track to reduce and reverse this trend. Professor Hawkes said “One in 12 people globally have diabetes now, and nearly two billion people are obese or overweight. We must stem the tide.” Find out more.

Gender stereotypes strong in infants

boy with car

What have you got for the little kids in your life this Christmas? Something ‘gender appropriate’, or something that breaks those stereotypes? A new study from academics at City University London and UCL found that children as young as 9 months-old prefer to play with toys specific to their own gender, according to the research in Infant and Child Development. The paper found that in a familiar nursery environment significant sex differences were evident at an earlier age than gendered identity is usually demonstrated. It continues that boys and girls follow different developmental patterns with respect to selection of gender-typed toys due to both biological and developmental-environmental differences. Continue reading.

How easily can you spot an online lie?

lies

Spotting an online lie is now easier than ever thanks to a team of academics who have designed an algorithm that can detect lies in emails. The research team from Cass, Westminster Business School and Catholic University of Louvain developed the algorithm by identifying linguistic cues of deception found within online communications such as emails. The full paper, ‘Untangling a Web of Lies: Exploring Automated Detection of Deception in Computer-Mediated Communication’ is published in the Journal of Management Information Systems. Read further.

Men still dominate sports journalism

sports

Despite some high-profile female sports presenters arriving on our screens in the past decade, the story is not the same throughout sports journalism. Professor Suzanne Franks, Head of the Department of Journalism, highlights why the number of women working on the sports desks of UK national newspapers has not improved over recent decades. The study, by academics at City, University of London and the University of Huddersfield, asked journalists why there were not enough women in the field and found aspects of the modern media climate could be hindering progress. The findings were published in the US journal Media Report to Women and built on their previous study which was conducted after the 2012 Olympic Games. Find out more.

Worldwide attention for City economist

mutual funds headline

The Wall Street Journal cited a research paper co-authored by a City economist which showed a link between national monetary policy changes and decisions by investors to withdraw their money from investment funds. Professor Gabriel Montes-Rojas is one of three academics behind a study that found that sudden actions by central banks, such as the US Federal Reserve, can have significant effects on the behaviour of investors and this can result in financial instability in bond and equity markets. Continue this article.

Virtual reality world helps stroke recovery

screenshot of programme

Impaired speech and language following a stroke has profound consequences for quality of life. The effects on personal and social relationships are particularly devastating, with loss of friends commonly reported. New research shows a virtual reality world called EVA Park can help, according to a paper published in PLOS ONE by academics at City, University of London. It shows the potential for technology to play an important role in improving the everyday lives of people with aphasia, which is a language disorder affecting about one third of stroke survivors. Further details.

Men 25% more likely to get a payrise

money v gender

The gender pay gap has been big news in 2016, and this report from Cass Business School, the University of Warwick and the University of Wisconsin is helping to shed light on why it persists. The paper confronts the previous theories, which have all been based on reasons why women might be reluctant to ask for an increase in their pay packet. Co-author Dr Amanda Goodall at Cass Business School said “Ours is the first proper test of the reticent-female theory, and the evidence doesn’t stand up.” In fact, their report shows that females do ask for payrises, but are less likely to get them than men. Keep reading.

Cass leads the call for financial reform

number crunching exec

A Cass Business School report for New City Agenda says that Britain’s financial regulators must change to avoid sleepwalking into another financial crisis that will have a devastating effect on our economy and political system, and that crucial changes made following the 2008 economic crash are already being watered down. Get the details here.

Boko Haram’s media strategies studied

map showing Nigeria

Reserach from Dr Abdullahi Tasiu Abubakar shows how the changing media strategy of Boko Haram reflects their change from a peaceful movement in 2002 into a violent insurgency of 15,000 fighters. Published in a chapter of Africa’s Media Image in the 21st Century and based on interviews with individuals who have had first-hand dealings with Boko Haram, the research found that the organisation rose to notoriety through their long-standing commitment to self-promotion, barbaric activities, effective communication with journalists and the western media’s “obsession” with jihad-related stories. More information.

Chinese M&A in the UK

handshake with UK and China flags

Cass has published innovative research into Chinese M&A market, focussing on acquisitions from China to the UK from 2012 to mid-2016. During this time Chinese companies began making frequent acquisitions in the UK. With the growth of Chinese outbound M&A activities and their foreign direct investment (FDI) becoming increasingly important to the world’s economy, the research is both timely and useful in examining whether these investments create value to shareholders of the acquiring firms and which factors will drive performance. Continue reading this arcticle.

Meet the Principal

Alumni Stories, Health Sciences News.

 michael-blog-photoAn Adult Nursing graduate, Mike Sonny is now at the helm of London Waterloo Academy. We asked the former health professional what life is like in the Principal’s Office.

Can you tell me about your time at City?

I graduated in 2004 with a PG Diploma in Adult Nursing. The lectures were informative, interactive, well-structured, challenging and fun at the same time. We had plenty of opportunities to practice in clinical placements thanks to the faculty. I loved the engagement of academic literature, research and the science of nursing.

All in all, this course was an amazing experience, particularly having to attend lectures in various locations around the city. Not easy at times but it was like an adventure locating the various sites.

What happened after you graduated?

I went into clinical practice and a turn of events took me into teaching in Further Education and Higher Education (FE/HE) colleges – I was actually headhunted! Whilst at City, I had always had this feeling that I would end up in the teaching, research and training UK workforce.

From lecturing, I became Director of Studies for several years. In 2007, I was appointed Principal of London College of Management. I had also obtained an MSc in Public Service Management from the London South Bank University, and so the desire to combine management and leadership was irresistible for me.

During that year I was also invited to Bangladesh by the UK awarding body OTHM, to launch their flagship qualification (Level 4-7 QCF). That success led to my being conferred a Fellowship, followed by another whilst Head of Establishment of Scott’s College

In 2009, I held the position of Associate Professor – Marketing Research at Schiller International University, London, before they relocated back to Florida, USA. Since 2010, I have settled down as the Principal / CEO of London Waterloo Academy; providing education and training to the UK workforce in Dental Nursing, Health and Social Care, Management, Airline Cabin Crew, languages and Corporate Training.

What was the transition from teacher to principal like?

I was actually headhunted again for the position of Principal. For me, the transition was challenging but I had to get stuck in because I was already the Director of Studies across the FE/HE College and leading a team of lecturers and other staff members. This involves upholding quality assurance, leading institutional accreditations, maintaining standards, international student recruitment and maintaining Home Office regulatory requirements.

What has been the biggest challenge?

Keeping up with the breath of regulatory changes across the HE/FE sector has to be my biggest challenge e.g. upholding and maintaining institutional accreditation from regulators like (QAA, BAC, ASIC, ISI, Home Office) all of whom continue to have an impact on leading higher education in the UK. Another huge challenge is maintaining student satisfaction, achievements, retention and funding.

What has been the most rewarding experience?

I would say student satisfaction and achievement. I was again privileged to participate in our 2016 Graduation ceremony and I was moved when children of our graduating students came up to me and requested to wear my graduating hat.

Every year, I see the smile and gratitude from students, parents, friends and families as they graduate. That’s rewarding for me. It means that the Academy under my leadership has added value to their lives and that we have enabled them to achieve what they set out to do when they joined the institution. I most also mention the wonderful and fantastic colleagues I work with.

Do you have any advice for anyone looking to follow in your footsteps?

It’s difficult to say. For me, it is to enjoy doing what you love. Be flexible and adaptable to changing times in your skills and training. This is inevitable due to external factors beyond one’s control. Finally, I pray a lot. That’s what has kept me going.

 

Finally, it’s the quick-fire question round!

Favourite place in London:  The view from Waterloo Bridge in either direction
Favourite holiday destination:   Disneyland Paris
Must-check everyday website: Any one my email throws up
Dream travel destination:  Island beach
Cheese or chocolate: Chocolate for me

 

 

Working in the USA

Alumni Notice Board, Arts and Social Sciences News, Careers, Cass Business School News, City Graduate School, Health Sciences News, Law News, Mathematics, Computer Science & Engineering News, Webinars.

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On Thursday 23rd June 2016, we hosted our fourth alumni careers webinar. The topic was “Working in the USA”, and focussed on the next steps you need to take to work and live in the USA.

This webinar was recorded and is now available here. Running Time 50 mins.

Image credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/thomashawk

How to Effectively Use Recruitment Agencies

Alumni Notice Board, Arts and Social Sciences News, Careers, Cass Business School News, City Graduate School, Health Sciences News, Law News, Mathematics, Computer Science & Engineering News, Webinars.

efectively use recruitment

On Thursday 21st April 2016, we hosted our third alumni careers webinar. The topic was “How to Effectively Use Recruitment Agencies”, and focussed on the importance of building a good relationship with a recruiter.

This webinar was recorded and is now available here. Running Time 39 mins.

 

 

Communicating Your Transferable Skills

Arts and Social Sciences News, Careers, Cass Business School News, City News, Health Sciences News, Law News, Mathematics, Computer Science & Engineering News, Webinars.

webinar

On Thursday 17th March 2016, we hosted our second alumni careers webinar. The topic was “Communicating your Transferable Skills”, and focussed on how to best showcase your skills.

This webinar was recorded and is now available here. Running Time 35 mins.

NOTE you may not be able to see the links as mentioned in some of the answers, please find the Prospects job profiles here and the City Careers website here.

This presentation was given by David Gilchrist. For more from him click here.

Enhance Your Professional Digital Brand

Arts and Social Sciences News, Careers, Cass Business School News, City News, Health Sciences News, Law News, Mathematics, Computer Science & Engineering News, Webinars.

webinar

On Thursday 18th February 2016, we hosted our first alumni careers webinar. The topic was “How to Enhance your Professional Digital Brand”, and focussed on tips for LinkedIn.

This webinar was recorded and is now available here. Running Time 54 mins.

Facilitating better Post Operative Care

Health Sciences News.

IMG_8876Introduction

Research undertaken by the Kings Fund has shown that the number of hospital beds has been declining for many years in England. Over the past 26 years the number of available hospital beds in England has more than halved. This decrease is more marked in beds for people with learning disabilities, mental illness and for longer-term care of older people.

The National Audit Office has suggested that hospitals with average bed occupancy levels above 85 per cent can expect to have regular bed shortages, periodic bed crises and increased numbers of health care-acquired infections. Such shortages can compromise patient’s effective recovery and can even put lives at risk. Consequently beds in the NHS are under intense pressure more than ever.

Bed space is further challenged by poor discharge planning but more significantly by patient readmission. Patient readmission is a critical issue for all hospitals and is a major expense to the NHS. With effective management this cost can be reduced if modern systems are made available to help hospitals manage and alleviate this pressure. Such systems would need to offer managers and clinicians the ability to change current practices at scale and pace rather than being incremental and offering marginal change and savings.

For a long time, physicians and nurses have recognised the importance of recovery in a patient’s treatment cycle. By closely monitoring the quality of a patient’s recovery, staff are able to detect any developing unwellness early allowing it to be quickly and effectively handled. Alternatively, if not treated, it could eventually develop into a serious condition thus requiring a longer hospital stay or if not detected, may result in a readmission, each consequence adding further cost and burden to the NHS. Consequently, better patient outcomes allow for reduced length of stay. Decreased length of stay reduces the level of resources a hospital needs to allocate so by allowing it to effectively reduce and manage its costs by attuning its services towards all patients.

Until now, monitoring a patient’s quality of recovery has been poorly measured and evaluated. Data collection can be very haphazard, confusing to patients and staff and limited in scope. Some basic methods currently used in some hospitals are labour intensive and offer limited clinical value due to their lack of depth and range. Consequently a significant opportunity exists to develop the art of postoperative quality of recovery monitoring and evaluation as a clinical tool. This would be achieved by creating a modern patient centric system that harnesses the power of big data whose interface allows for differing language and cultures to be immediately understood. So rather than placing patient’s secondary to IT systems an opportunity exists to develop a flexible web-based solution using evidenced based comparative data to measure, evaluate and improve patient outcomes while helping to develop best clinical practice.

The solution

An international team including researchers at City University London’s School of Health Sciences have been working to address the issue of measuring and evaluating the quality of patient recovery after surgery (post-operative recovery).

Over recent years, an innovative and unique tool has been developed which has the potential to benefit all patients, doctors, hospitals and the NHS. An easy to use web-based system allows doctors, researchers and managers to monitor and evaluate a patient’s recovery from surgery. It is called PostopQRS™. (Postoperative Quality of Recovery Scale).

PostopQRS™ is at an exciting stage of its development with over 50 research clinicians having successfully used the technology in studies. PostopQRS™ currently exists in research trial mode and is not yet optimised for general launch but endorsement received to date from evaluators indicate that it could have a significant impact on monitoring and evaluating post-operative recovery. PostopQRS™ has uniquely received endorsement from two societies related to enhance patient recovery and so this helps validate City University London belief, that with the right type of support, PostopQRS™ has the ability to transform the current clinical service model to benefit both patients and the NHS.

By using a tablet or smart phone, with a minimal amount of training, hospital staff, be it a doctor, nurse or carer can evaluate a patient within 6 minutes, assessing their physical, emotional, pain and cognitive health domains. Due to PostopQRS™ ease of use, simple interface and its ability to quickly process data, readings can be taken repeatedly at predetermined times throughout the period of patient care. It can be done in person or over the phone after a patient has been discharged so offering post discharge support and monitoring.

The data collected can be used to:

  • Objectively assess how a patient recovers from surgery using evidenced based data
  • Analyse trends from groups of patients enabling the manipulation of ‘big data’ to identify best practice, trends and outcomes and comparing hospitals in their delivery of patient treatment interventions.
  • Help improve recovery from surgery for elderly and high risk patients
  • Evaluate a patients physiological, emotional and cognitive health after surgery as well as their medical condition
  • Evaluate techniques and conditions to support doctors as they plan post-operative and discharge care

Benefits of PostopQRS™

PostopQRS™ will have immense benefits to patients:

  • A patient being monitored by PostopQRS™ will know that their care is being regularly monitored on multiple levels, not just the medical outcome of their surgery. The system allows doctors to monitor post-surgery anxiety, sickness, cognition and many other important factors. At the moment these are not monitored in a way that demonstrates if one area impacts on another.
  • They will benefit from an early warning system, if they are not recovering then the system will quickly flag this to their doctor.
  • The patient will know that they are receiving the best intervention, structured in the best way for their particular problem.
  • Allows for a fundamental shift towards care that is co-ordinated around the full range of a patient’s needs (rather than care based around a single disease).

PostopQRS™ will have a considerable impact on the NHS:

  • The system will save doctors time, improve their abilities to monitor their patients and improve care levels. They will be able to review and monitor all their patients remotely and in real time.
  • The system will allow hospitals to know how different doctors are performing against their peers, they will know what interventions work best for which medical condition and help guide resource allocation (for each medical condition) and investment decisions.
  • The system will allow the NHS to compare hospitals with each other, guide their investment decisions based on data and will be able to direct resources for the biggest benefit to patients.
  • It allows for a more integrated care system as the tool fosters a new level of patient centred care and allows for a genuine patient partnership in their recovery.
  • Data collected will help managers decide on how services are commissioned and paid for and will allow them to compare how improvements in care are delivered across hospitals, regions and nationally within the NHS.

PostopQRS™ will provide an outstanding research tool to enable healthcare professionals to make major improvements to the quality of patient care:

  • to identify what can be done to stop patients developing chronic pain after surgery
  • to understand what long term harm may result from anaesthesia, particular following repeated anaesthetics
  • to learn what outcomes should be used to measure the success of anaesthesia and peri-operative care
  • to improve recovery from surgery for elderly and high risk patients
  • to assess for which patients does regional anaesthesia give better outcomes than general anaesthesia
  • to enhance recovery programmes measuring short and long-term outcomes
  • to help improve communication between teams looking after patients throughout their surgical journey

The future of PostopQRS™

With the exception of corporate charitable support from a major healthcare company, this project has been self-funded by the institutions represented by the international team managing the project. More development is required before PostopQRS™ can be fully launched as a self sustainable model. The objective is that it will be run as a self-funded system by clinicians and managers from hospitals, pharmaceutical companies and other bodies paying a subscription to access the tools processing and reporting abilities which will help to guide investment, spending, future research and best practice across the UK and internationally.

There is already considerable interest from NHS hospitals, private healthcare providers and international health systems who would benefit from implementing the technology. As the lead research partner, City University London is keen to launch this system which is very much aligned to the School of Health Sciences Allied Health Care agenda.

Support required

The University aims to secure at least £150,000 for key parts of the project which are currently preventing the team from developing a sustainable, patient focused business. This includes:

  • Funding for the salary of a Project Manager to take this exciting system to the stage where it can be launched as a self-sustaining enterprise
  • Upgrading the features and mobile functionality of the website to be customer friendly so that patients will be encouraged to use the system
  • Formalising and producing the supporting and commercial infrastructure to allow for self-sustaining operations
  • Securing ISO certification, subcontractors and IP to ensure the project can become a viable enterprise

Summary

Measuring and evaluating the quality of patient recovery is the focus of PostopQRS™. The tool can quickly alert clinicians and carers if patient’s recovery is becoming compromised. Rather than providing fragmented information about a patient treatment (or series of patients) PostopQRS™ proactively passes on the full picture of recovery rather than pockets of ad hoc information to carers and clinicians. Accordingly, the system provides a more holistic picture of a patient’s journey through recovery so providing a more integrated doctor/patient care pathway.

We expect that PostopQRS™, as a tool, will make a significant difference for all surgical patients and improve communication between surgical and non-surgical teams looking after patients throughout their surgical journey.

This innovative system is designed to measure and evaluate the outcomes for patients after surgery having the potential to benefit patients from six years old and upwards. Currently there is nothing that can deliver such comprehensive support to patients, doctors, and the NHS and drug providers so completion of the development programme will allow PostopQRS™ to become self-sustainable so it can be promoted to a wider audience.

For more information please contact David Street by email on David.Street.1@city.ac.uk or call on 0207 040 5556.

Image credit © Flickr user daveynin

City University London and Cass Business School Alumni – Where Are They Now?

Arts and Social Sciences News, Cass Business School News, City News, Health Sciences News, Law News, Mathematics, Computer Science & Engineering News , .

It’s January graduations this week, and to celebrate we’ve been having a look at our alumni all over the world. And we mean all over the world! We wanted to find out where they are, and what they are doing – and here are the results for everyone we have up-to-date details for.

Where are City alumni?

where in the world_city

What jobs are City alumni doing?

city degree

Where are Cass alumni?

where in the world_cass

What jobs are Cass alumni doing?

cass degree

You can contact the local alumni network in your country on our Alumni Ambassador pages. We have separate pages for City and Cass but the alumni work together.

See your future in health care? Start here

Health Sciences News, New Courses and Scholarships.

HealthCity’s School of Health Sciences offers a range of Postgraduate Diploma (PG Dip) degree courses for alumni who have a first degree from a subject non-related to healthcare, but wish to work in the healthcare sector.

Our PG Dip courses are funded by the NHS for home students and on successful graduation students gain registration with the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC), providing an internationally recognised professional qualification, allowing them to work in the healthcare sector in the UK and overseas.

Find out more about our courses:

Postgraduate Diploma Nursing / Adult

Postgraduate Diploma Nursing / Child

Postgraduate Diploma Nursing / Mental Health

Apply Now

We have limited places available to study on our PG Dip courses this September, so if this sounds like the next step for you, check out our course pages and apply through UCAS undergraduate today.

For further information on all our courses please contact our Admissions Team via phone 020 7040 5000 or email health@city.ac.uk.

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City, University of London is an independent member institution of the University of London. Established by Royal Charter in 1836, the University of London consists of 18 independent member institutions with outstanding global reputations and several prestigious central academic bodies and activities.

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