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Queen’s Birthday Honours List 2018

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Congratulations to the following alumni and staff who have all been named in the Queen’s Birthday Honours List 2018

Mr Huw Thomas
Auditor General For Wales, Wales Audit Office
Administrative Sciences MBA, 1971
Commanders of the Order of the British Empire
For services to Public Audit and Accountability in Wales.

Mr James Law
Professor of Speech & Language Sciences, Newcastle University
PhD Clinical Communication Studies, 1993
Order of the British Empire
For services to Speech and Language Therapy.

Professor Jane Marshall
Divisional Lead – LCS, City, University of London
PhD Speech and Language Science
Order of the British Empire
For services to Education in Health Sciences.

Dame Janet Vitmayer
Former Chief Executive Officer, Horniman Museum & Gardens
MA Museums and Gallery Administration, 1990
Dames Commander of the Order of the British Empire
For services to Museums and diversity.

Professor Jennifer Temkin
Professor, The City Law School, City, University of London
Commanders of the Order of the British Empire
For services to Criminal Justice.

Dr Kathryn Adie
Presenter (former chief correspondent for BBC News), BBC Radio 4
Honorary Doctor of Letters, 1989
Commanders of the Order of the British Empire
For services to Media.

Professor Kenneth Grattan
Dean of Graduate School, City, University of London
Order of the British Empire
For services to the Science.

Ms Mary Morley
Director of Therapies, South West London and St George’s Mental Health Trust
MHM Health Management, 1998
Order of the British Empire
For services to Occupational Therapy.

Dr Ruth Caleb
Chair, Mental Wellbeing in Higher Education
MA Psychotherapy and Counselling, 1996
Member of the British Empire
For services to Higher Education.

Mr Thomas Ilube
CEO/Founder, Crossword Cybersecurity
Finance MBA, 1988
Commanders of the Order of the British Empire
For services to Technology and Philanthropy.

Professor Tong Sun
Senior Lecturer, SEMS, City, University of London
BEng Electrical & Electronic Engineering, 1999
Order of the British Empire
For services to Engineering.

Image credit: royalcorrespondent.com

I am DIA

Alumni Stories, Uncategorized.

Dia Poster ST - 8TH JULY CHANGEDia Thanki – aka DIA – studied BSc Management and Systems, and went on to be a project manager and then founded her own record label. She will be playing her first solo concert on 24th September. We had a chat about this exciting change of direction!

Tell me about your time at Cass

I did my undergraduate degree at Cass – I studied a BSc (Hons) Management and Systems and I did well – I got a 2:1 and really enjoyed the experience. I met great people from all around the world, and I still keep in touch with some of the lecturers. It was a really inspiring time.

What did you get up to next?

I got a studentship to do a Masters in Management Information Systems at Cranfield University. This was a one year course and when I finished I couldn’t find the role I wanted, so I joined a Motown group called “Mission Blue” for a short time as a backing singer and dancer and we performed nationally. We performed covers of all the classic Motown hits, but I left because I realised I prefer to be a solo artist, performing my own songs.

I eventually got hired at Lehman Brothers having taken a gap year as a teenager to work at PricewaterhouseCoopers in their Corporate & International Tax division. I then moved to Turner & Townsend, a construction project management firm where I worked as an Information Systems Manager. Following this, I fell in to project management with the likes of British Telecom, Bupa and many more private and public sector clients as a freelance Consultant, advising on operational and strategic planning.

Though I was successful at my work, I realised that this wasn’t fulfilling, so I decided to go to LA. I joined a vocal camp in the summer, and was coached by Seth Riggs who has coached the likes of Beyonce and Michael Jackson. I went there for a few weeks and learned important concepts like vocal technique, stage presence, production and song writing – and it spurred me on to start following through with my dream to be a singer.

When did you start being interested in music?

When I was 5 years old I had a keyboard my aunty bought me and I just started playing it intuitively – so that was really the first sign that I had a propensity towards music. I properly fell into music around age 13. I participated in a song contest in London and I was a finalist alongside a few others in the same age category, and we performed in front of 500 people. I also then chose to do GCSE music.

Also my aunty ran a community group called Holly Hall Music, so I went along and met lots of other teens with different talents and we performed every year at different venues like Islington Town Hall and various theatres. I had a very active extra-curricular life with playing the keyboard, singing, choreography and dancing during my teenage years. Patrick Jean-Paul Denis was my vocal coach and gave me the support I needed to develop my voice.

So, your first solo show?

I finally set up my own record label about two and half years ago. I decided I want to write songs, manage and co-produce the set. I’ve had ups and downs in the industry so it’s nice to have that control. My first solo concert will be on 24th September.

I’m the headliner and I’ve got producers from Paris (Audible Art) and the Netherlands (Roman & Ravy) working on the music production. It’s going to be more of a dance production rather than a live band; I’ve got Del Mak on board. He is one of the UK’s top choreographers and often gets invited to be a judge at hip-hop competitions. My concert on the 24th September is at the Watermans Theatre in Brentford near Chiswick, West London.

What has been your main challenge along the way?

Being ethnically Indian (I was actually born in Kenya and I grew up in London), people in the industry have always wanted me to fuse Bollywood and pop music and I didn’t really want to do that as it’s not really my style. I love urban music – hip hop, dancehall and house music. There are some world influences in some of my songs but I’m trying to break free from this box they often try to put artists in and I just want to produce pioneering, great quality work to attract a diverse demographic regardless or gender, ethnicity or age.

Do you have any advice for anyone following in your footsteps?

I’m still at the early stages of my music career but I would say that I don’t have any regrets regarding my late start into music. My project management background has certainly helped me run my own label, especially with the multitasking and delegating – there are lots of transferable skills so if anyone is considering a career transition, I think they should maximise their past experiences and apply their skills into their new career. Nothing is ever wasted and it’s all part of the journey.

Having said that, there are moments where I wished I had followed my passion earlier, however, I guess everything happens for a reason. If you have a passion for something, you should definitely follow it, even if it’s part-time to begin with.

Finally, it’s the quick fire question round!

Favourite place in London: Erm.. The Shard GONG bar – it has a fantastic view of London and I always feel so grateful to be living in one of the best cities in the world!
Favourite holiday destination: Bali without a doubt!
Must check every day website: www.iamdia.com 🙂
Dream travel destination: Hawaii
Cheese or chocolate: Cheese (when I’m not going through my vegan phase!) – I’ve not got much of a sweet tooth!

Follow DIA on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter via @iamdiauk. To buy tickets for DIA’s concert visit the booking website or call Chilli Tickets directly on 020 3474 0674.

An Address Book for the Digital Age

Alumni Stories, Cass Business School News, Uncategorized , .

Tassos Papantoniou studied Shipping, Trade and Finance from 2006 – 2007 and has been juggling his day job as a yacht broker with his new venture, an app called ConnectID. He came to Cass to have a chat about this new direction.

Tell me about your time at Cass!

I did Shipping Trade & Finance, and to be honest, I wasn’t as focused as I should have been but I passed all my exams in August 2007. It was quite a change from my first degree, History & Philosophy, which I studied in the USA. This has remained of great interest to me, perhaps more so than Finance, as it turns out I am more of a creative person.

The course at Cass was a year long and I lived in central London. I didn’t tend to meet up with many people from my course, but I’ve found a few of them on LinkedIn since, and I regularly see some of them through my other business that is a yacht brokerage.

What did you do next?

After I graduated I started working for Torrance, a boutique yacht brokerage. They made me a partner, and I’m still working there today. We have had a good run with selling a 120 meter project now called MARAYA, the rebuild, charter and resale of Christina O and a healthy list of other very notable sales as well as chartering super-yachts.

How did you get the idea for ConnectID?

I had the idea for ConnectID about two years ago, and about a year ago, the idea finally solidified into the form it’s in today.

It came from going to boat shows, where I would give out so many business cards, and get around two or three hundred in return – by the end of the event you can’t remember anyone and you are left with a pile of cards to administer to a digital form if they are to be of use in the future! Once I started developing the idea, it became evident from our focus groups and chatting to people that people really want to be able to keep their address book up to date, and get rid of all that clutter, like having people’s old telephone numbers. Also with all the social networks we have today, we end up having the same person in 4-5 different places (emails, mobile, Whatsaap, Facebook, LinkedIn) so the idea is to have everything in one place with ConnectiD contacts. Basically, the idea was to tidy up everyone’s address books and create the first meta network that will keep everyone up to date as details change.

So, what does the app do?

The app can tidy up your personal contacts and ensure it stays updated as well as offering a service to organisations to keep their information up to date. It’s an app for everyday users to exchange details quickly and when you have some contact information that’s changed, everyone gets updated details based on what they already hold for you. It’s quick to use, you ask for one piece of information i.e mobile or email and you can exchange all or a subset of your contact details quickly – great for use in social or business situations, rather than having to, for example, give a phone number, swap email addresses, get their personal email and then find them on Facebook etc.

It gets even more interesting once you’re attached to an organisation that uses ConnectiD, you can then also see what information they hold on you, and update it, plus you can connect and collaborate with others members of the organisation to exchange a full set of details.

You can be attached to just one organisation, or to multiple organisations, and the same way you update everyone at once from your contacts, you update the organisations on the info they have for you at the same time, so next time you move house or change your number its just one simple update and everyone you share your details with will be updated without lifting a finger.

What have the challenges been?

There were a lot! I had never done anything technical before! I started this project so its been a challenging but equally rewarding journey. I partner with a company in Greece who had developed something similar in the past, and they have been invaluable in dealing with the nuances of contacts management since they took over the development. The app is much smarter now.

The whole idea is about one place that you can update everyone and everything. One or two years from now, I envisage that when you change your address, there will be no need to call, for example, Sky, EDF etc. The dream is that this app would be capable of updating them all at once. I want to organise the worlds contact information, be the number one source for updated information with users permission and be a go to hub for all other communications – it’s not a new social network you have the original social network in the contacts in your phone already, but ConnectiD will be the first true meta-network.

If you could start again from the beginning what advice would you give yourself?

I’m not sure I’d do anything differently if I went back to the start. I would still need to work with a strong technical team. I’d make sure they were someone who had prior experience of what I wanted to do and would iteratively build something of value for customers so I could test it in the market early.

It‘s important that whatever you do, you do it at the lowest cost possible, and you get your product out as soon as possible to get some learning and feedback from customers on it. As soon as you have a viable product, get it out there with good analytics in place and go from there. This process has taken over a year for me!

We’re in a healthy place now, but there have been a lot of ups and downs along the way. One month everything will be fantastic, the next it’s all scary looking. Believe in what you are doing and build a team that really believes in the idea, and together you’ll get there!

Finally, it’s the quick fire question round!

Favourite place in London: Cruising down the Thames
Favourite holiday destination: Caribbean
Must-visit every day website: Reuters News, or BBC news on the TV
Dream travel destination: I’ve been to everywhere I want to go!
Cheese or chocolate: Chocolate!

Download the ConnectID app for up to date contacts always, available on IOS or Android.

Alumnus Creates App For Smarter Networking

Cass Business School News, Uncategorized , .

GrahamBlogPic2Graham Evans studied for a BSc in Banking & International Finance from 1986 – 1989, a period of time which included Black Monday. He has since gone on to forge a 20-year career as an Independent Financial Advisor and has now branched out into the start-up world. We sat down for a chat.

Tell me about your Cass experience!

I studied Banking & International Finance, starting in 1986. Back then, we all lived in the halls of residence on Bunhill Row called Northampton Hall (which is the tall building on left in this image). It was a huge building with 17 or 18 floors. I was at Cass for the crash in 1987, it was very interesting being in Moorgate with all the privatisations. Students were taking their loans and investing them in the privatisation until BP failed!

The Business School was in the Barbican then – Frobisher Crescent. I was partly based up in Angel, and partly at the Barbican, which made for an eclectic mix.

I’m still in contact with around half a dozen people from my course and university in general, and they are starting to retire! I’m just starting to start-up!

Do you attend many alumni events?

Until recently, I’ve only really seen fellow alumni on a social basis – I meet pretty regularly with my City and Cass group. I recently re-engaged with the school itself through the Alumni Office. I was invited to an event to give feedback on my alumni experience, and realised the power of the alumni network.

What did you do after graduating?

I went to Lloyds Bank, but I soon got bored with being office based every day. I then decided to set myself up as an Independent Financial Advisor and I have been doing that as my day job for the past 20 years. I tend to deal primarily with high net worth clients on tax.

How did the idea for Linccup come about?

When my wife gave birth to our twins, around seven and a half years ago, I thought that my income was ok, but I could do with some capital. So I put down my golf clubs and started looking for what’s missing in the world! For example, I’m soon to launch a new website offering free will writing after finding out that 70% of UK citizens don’t have a will. It’s being launched in conjunction with solicitors, who will sort out the probate at the back end.

Then, in between travelling to Bermuda, New York and Hong Kong for business, I sat there in my New York hotel lobby looking at all the other business travellers sat around on their phones. I thought that there must be a way for people to link up and find commonality. When you travel a lot on business, you get bored with room service very quickly, and I thought how much nicer it would be to meet people. I think most people don’t want to go out to a bar by themselves to find a bit of company. On LinkedIn you have your contacts list, but you can’t see where the person is – they may have gone to the UK and you’re in New York for the week, for example.

So I saw a big opportunity to take networking from 2D on the page, and take it out in to the real world, in 3D. Attitudes to privacy and data have changed enormously over the past few years, and we have so many notifications and followers etc. it’s hard to separate the useful information.

What is Linccup exactly?

It’s a location-based networking app with a business focus. For example, if you’re in New York for the week, you could search for nearby users in your industry who are happy to meet up for a drink, or for nearby users that are Cass alumni who are happy to meet for dinner. There are lots of ways you can search for nearby people, so that you get the most out of your time. You can also set alerts to tell you when contacts are nearby so you never miss another of those fortuitous coincidental meetings.

What’s been the biggest challenge?

Initially, you have the idea, but the biggest challenge is that then you need to work out what to do with it! Finding the right people to work with is key. This was my first start-up, so we went down the consultation route but if I did this again I wouldn’t use this service again. You have to believe in yourself!

If you’ve got contacts, if you’ve been to university, if you’ve worked for a couple of years, you can do it on your own and you don’t need expensive hand holding! There are always people offering to help with a business plan but you usually end up having to re-do it yourself anyway.

Then you need to get out and use your contacts. I’ve worked on this with Rob Gandee, our CEO, and I must say his help has been invaluable. I’m also very excited about the power of the alumni group, and also the other support that Cass offers alumni in their entrepreneurial endeavours.

What has been the most rewarding?

I have to say, seeing the app on the app store – taking it to that level of actuality. Success or failure then is partly down to how well we’ve done, but also down to the whims of life. It’s validating to know that I’ve had an idea and people are interested in backing it.

And finally, it’s the quick fire question round!
Favourite place in London: Camden
Favourite holiday destination: Lake Maggiore
Must check everyday website: liverpool-rumours.co.uk/
Dream travel destination: Tokyo
Cheese or chocolate: How about chocolate cheesecake? Best of both worlds!

Download the Linccup app from the Apple App Store – Linccup is coming soon to Android.

New Year’s Honours – Congratulations!

Uncategorized.

Paul-Curran-4L5A9930

Knighted

Paul Curran: Vice-Chancellor, City University London
Knighthood for services to Higher Education

Harvey McGrath: Honorary Graduate 2007
Knighthood for services to Economic Growth and Public Life

Alan Yarrow: Former Chancellor and Lord Mayor of London
Knighthood for services to International Business, Inclusion and the City of London

DBE

Heather Rabbatts: Honorary Graduate 1999
Dames Commander of the Order of the British Empire for public service and services to Football and Equality

OBE

Maree Barnett, Head of Emerging Infections, Department of Health: BSc Nursing and Midwifery 1996
OBE for services to Public Health

Pim (Pamela) Baxter, Deputy Director, National Portrait Gallery: MA Arts Administration 1990
OBE for services to the Arts

Prof Helen Odell-Miller, Professor of Music Therapy and Director,Music Therapy Research Centre, Anglia Ruskin University: MPhil Music Therapy 1989
OBE for services to Music Therapy

Cedric Wake, Chief Executive, The Nautical Institute: MSc Shipping, Trade and Finance 1989
OBE for services to the Maritime Industry

MBE

Bradley Hemmings, Artistic Director, Greenwich and Docklands International Festival: MA Arts Administration 1987
MBE for services to Culture and Disability Arts particularly in London

David Hong, Optometrist: MSC Clinical Optometry 1998
MBE for services to Optometry particularly voluntary service to Optometry Abroad

Janet Leach, Head of Disabled Children’s Services, London Borough of Enfield: Currently doing her MSc Voluntary Sector Management (Conversion)
MBE for services to Children with Special Educational Needs

Elizabeth Lees, Deputy Director, Nursing and Patient Experience, East and North Hertfordshire NHS Trust: SONM Undergraduate Occasional 2007
MBE for services to Nursing

Helen Marriage, Founder, Artichoke: Dip Arts Administration 1987
MBE for services to the Arts and Outdoor Performance

Carmel McConnell, Founder, Magic Breakfast charity: MBA 1993
MBE for services to School Food

Jaz Rabadia, Senior Manager of Energy and Initiatives, Starbucks and STEM Ambassador: MSc Energy and Environmental Technology and Economics 2010
MBE for services to Sustainability in the Energy Management Sector and Diversity in the STEM Sectors

Congratulations to you all!

From EMBA to New Interactions With Things

Cass Business School News, Uncategorized , .

2015-09-05 20.24.56EMBA alumnus (2014) Patrick Beraud talks about doing an Executive MBA, life after Cass and the fast-paced world of tech start-ups. He is set to launch his first platform, Bemoir, at the end of this month. Patrick is based in Melbourne.

Tell me about your time at Cass!

I studied the Executive MBA, and what I remember most are the two initiation workshops in a fire service school, which was really immersive, and the international electives in South Africa and Vietnam. Those were eyes opening and really transformed me.

What advice would you give someone who is thinking about doing the Executive MBA or has just started?

I would say enjoy it while you are at it, because sometimes I look back and feel like, I wish I could re-experience some of those moments again. Although none of those moments I dream of are about submitting an assignment :=)

You’re based in Melbourne now – do you attend many Cass events?

Yes I am in where they call down-under, Melbourne, Australia. I travelled to the Monaco Alumni event in September. For me, it was an opportunity to reconnect with what an MBA has to offer. I really enjoyed meeting up with former classmates or new ones, hearing where they are now, what are they doing and how their stories have changed since they completed the MBA.

What did you go on to do after graduating from Cass?

Well, it was a roller coaster and it still is. I had a business idea well researched, so I started working on it part-time, putting the team together to launch the venture while in parallel I was working in a corporate environment. Then this year in January I moved to full time on my own venture and since then the roller coaster has been much more than anything I expected – I think the right words are, anything I could have ever imagined.

This new venture, it’s called Bemoir – what’s it all about?

Bemoir is an internet-based product using technologies such as NFC, Thinfilm and RFID to give unique digital life to physical objects. Our customers can use the platform to attach videos, photos, and audio to their prized possessions such as one-of-a-kind artwork or collectibles. By attaching thoughts and emotions to their items, our customers can increase the saleability of their products and perpetuate the product’s value.

Bemoir is a fully rich media digital platform with associated iOS and Android mobile applications. To use on a painting, for example, simply wave your smart phone over the painting that has Bemoir tag attached to it, you can reveal the story of the item, providing you a rich enhanced experience through the artist’s eye. Simply imagine walking around every artwork you come across, you can wave your phone at to discover more about it, or at a museum, or at your own family heirlooms.

Our beta platform is live and we are on track to officially launch Bemoir on Thursday 3rd December.

What’s your top tip for anyone looking to start their own business?

Settle in for the long haul, and expect everything to go wrong. But if you want to walk away from the 95%, as Jim Rohn once said, then that should be enough reason for you to start.

What’s next for you?

I have no idea – welcome to the tech startup world! But of course I will make Bemoir a success, so I still have three to five years ahead of me. We’ve given ourselves a big challenge, and that is to give everyone the power or the tools to express their individuality and uniqueness. And that is what Bemoir is for. It is to “be” and it is “moi”. So as you can see, what is next for me is to fulfil that vision. Remember we are just starting.

Finally, it’s the quick-fire question round!
Favourite place in London: East Dulwich Park
Favourite holiday destination: Portugal, from the south to the north
Dream travel destination: Croatia
Must-visit everyday website: I must visit all four at the same time, I don’t know why! They are time.com, guardian.co.uk, ft.com and bbc.co.uk, oh and sputnik news haha!
Cheese or chocolate: Cheese anytime!

EMBA Alumnus now PR Entrepreneur

Cass Business School News, Uncategorized , .

Simon Barker Barker CommunicationsSimon Barker (EMBA, 2008) has just embarked upon the entrepreneurial life and started his own PR business, Barker Communications, based in London Bridge. We sat down to talk about going back to studying, PR and the unexpected.

Tell me about your time at Cass

First of all, I was introduced to you through Rav Roberts, who was my MBA mentor and did a great job. We’ve met up regularly since then and he’s become a good friend.

Cass was many things, including being hugely enjoyable. I’d been out of a formal learning environment since graduating from Leeds in 1992 – so it was 14 years later that I embarked on my second degree! It wasn’t difficult to get back into studying though, and it was exciting to be in a classroom environment and learning new stuff. It was great to interact with the school’s faculty and to be part of a really engaged group of colleagues, and we generated plenty of good discussions. But being back in an exam room was a bit of a shock!

It was a full-on couple of years and there was a lot of cramming-in of work. I had a very busy role at a PR firm at the time and I was working on the MBA Monday – Saturday, including bashing the books on my one-hour commute each way into the City, but I made sure to have Sundays off (for the most part). When I finished I was sorely tempted to carry on learning – I still might pick up some of my free electives. My third child was born three months after I started the EMBA, and for at least six months after I finished two-day weekends felt like a luxury.

The location of Cass is a great asset, right in the City. It’s a brilliant calling card. When I was there the school was in the FT’s top 10 global ranking for EMBAs. Everyone felt pretty chuffed about that and the school was pleased to give us mugs to show off the achievement.

What about the EMBA trips away?

The very first weekend at the military base in Portsmouth was excellent. It was a case of being thrown in with your new colleagues who came from all across the world and just getting on with it. We went to St Petersburg in the first year, and most of us to Shanghai in the second year. Both places were fascinating and I stayed on for extra time in China.

I studied with a great bunch of people and have made some good friends from the group. Many went through difficult times during their time at Cass, with around a quarter of them losing their job due to the recession.

What was the best thing about your EMBA?

It’s hard to pull out a single best but I really felt that one of the advantages of doing an EMBA rather than a full time MBA was that most people on the course had at least 10 years’ business experience to bring to the party. I think the youngest person in my cohort was 29 when we started.

In the first year all the modules were compulsory, but it was great to be able to focus on your areas of choice in the second year. Most of my year two modules were around finance and strategy and I did my dissertation under Professor Laura Empson on branding elite tier professional services firms – and was delighted to get a distinction.

Do you attend many alumni events?

I used to go to quite a lot, but I’ve been so busy lately I’ve not managed to get to as many. I’ll definitely be making more of an effort in the future because they are a good opportunity to meet people and often learn new things.

How is your current venture going?

Doing the EMBA cemented in my mind that I wanted to do my own thing. I had been thinking about it for some time and the stars aligned making this year the right time to launch Barker Communications.

One of the reasons I enjoy PR is because it’s so influential. If you’re not knowledgeable about something yourself, or know someone well who is, then everything you know comes from what you read, hear and see, so the power of PR and editorial endorsement in particular can have a huge impact on building a client’s business and brand. It’s very rewarding to develop a portfolio of media outputs for clients, knowing that those articles will be read by many people in the client’s target audience; then reviewed online as part of the due diligence process for people or organisations looking to engage with them.

My first business trip since starting up was to Warsaw to meet a financial services company, which is now a client. I’d worked in Warsaw for a few weeks in 1998, and it’s changed hugely since then, following sustained growth through most of that time and managing to avoid recession post Lehman. Other clients include a legal services firm and Silicon Roundabout company, and I’m seeing opportunities across other areas such as consulting, energy and human capital.

My resourcing model is to use a network of highly experienced practitioners, so the pitch is that senior people do the work as well as advise, with clients receiving a better and faster outcome (and experience getting there).

What has been the most unexpected challenge in launching your own business?

To look at it another way, I always knew that it would be important to expect the unexpected and be prepared for that as much as possible. All sorts of people have been in touch and I couldn’t have predicted that I’d be doing some of the things I’m doing. It’s about keeping an open mind to opportunities, being flexible and building that into your business strategy. I never expected my first overseas trip to be to Warsaw, for example.

What’s your top tip for the communications industry?

If you want to get into this industry, be hugely interested in the media, how it works and its various channels. Clearly, social media is evolving quickly, but there is still an enormous role for traditional media because the journalists writing it are trained, experienced and masters of their craft and the demand for these people will always be there. My key places to go for information are the FT, The Economist, The Sunday Times and the Today Programme. And it might seem obvious, but in any service-based business you’ve got to be able to relate to people honestly, helpfully and directly.

What’s next?

Fundamentally, it’s about growing the business and doing great work for clients. The two are very closely linked as doing great work builds personal reputation and referral.

Finally, it’s the Quick Fire Round!

Favourite place in London: The British Museum
Favourite holiday destination: China
Must-check every day website: FT.com, the Economist Espresso app (and The Today Programme)
Dream travel destination: Pakistan
Cheese or chocolate? [long pause] Cheese

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