CityLIS Events 19/20

This page shows key dates and events for the academic year 19/20, in the Department of Library & Information Science, CityLIS, at City, University of London.

The listing includes the popular CityLIS ‘After Hours’ seminar series. These events are open to all, and free to attend. After Hours events normally run from around 18.00 – 19.30, on Mondays, during term time.

CityLIS academic term dates can be confirmed via the main City University site: https://www.city.ac.uk/about/city-information/academic-year

If you need any further information, please contact Joseph Dunne-Howrie [joseph.dunne-howrie@city.ac.uk].

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2020

21st July: CityLIS Online Event

Interested in finding out more about City, University of London’s courses but unable to visit the campus? Take part in one of our online events.

City’s online events are designed to provide you with all the information you need to help you make the right decision, accessible from the comfort of your own home. By attending our sessions, you will have the opportunity to:

  • Participate in live Q&As with programme leaders, admissions staff and current City students
  • Find out more about the student experience and what it’s like to be a student at City
  • Learn about student services and support available at City (including finance, accommodation, visa advice, etc.)

Register via the link above!

Time: 16:30-17:30 (GMT)
Room: Online

21st April: CityLIS Online Event

Interested in finding out more about City, University of London’s courses but unable to visit the campus? Take part in one of our online events.

City’s online events are designed to provide you with all the information you need to help you make the right decision, accessible from the comfort of your own home. By attending our sessions, you will have the opportunity to:

  • Participate in live Q&As with programme leaders, admissions staff and current City students
  • Find out more about the student experience and what it’s like to be a student at City
  • Learn about student services and support available at City (including finance, accommodation, visa advice, etc.)

Register via the link above!

Time: 16:30-17:30 (GMT)
Room: Online

9th April: CityLIS Research Symposium “Building bridges: exploring interdisciplinary intersections between fandom, fan studies and library and information science“.

This event is free to attend and open to all. Anyone interested in LIS and Fan Studies is welcome. All participants must Register.

Time: 10.00 – 18.00
Room: A109, A110, AG04

30 March: After Hours “Working with Collections Data: Two Projects at LSE (2017-2019)” Kevin Wilson

***THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELLED DUE TO THE ONGOING SITUATION WITH THE CORONAVIRUS. WE HOPE TO RE-SCHEDULE FOR THE AUTUMN TERM***

 LSE Library’s collections are recognised for their outstanding national and international importance and have been awarded Designation status by the Arts Council. The Library’s collections cover the breadth of the social sciences and are designed to reflect the teaching, learning and research needs of LSE. In the last two years, Kevin has undertaken two extensive projects looking at LSE Library’s collections. The first was to test how our collections truly reflected teaching, learning and research as part of a wider collection evaluation project. This involved combining catalogue (ALMA), online reading list (Talis Aspire) and institutional repository data and looking at this from a Library of Congress classmark level. More recently, Kevin is working on updating LSE Library’s collection development policies through an EDI (Equity, Diversity and Inclusion) lens, and has reviewed the diversity of the LSE Library’s collections and reading lists through a combination of ALMA and Talis Aspire data. This work contributes to the decolonisation discussions occurring at LSE and will have benefits for academic staff wishing to decolonise their teaching.

Bio: Kevin has worked in academic libraries for over fifteen years and has been the Academic Liaison and Collection Development Manager at LSE since July 2017. He leads LSE Library’s liaison activity with over twenty departments and many more research centres, managing a team of 3.4 Academic Support Librarians. He also leads on the development, management and promotion of the Library’s collections, with particular focus on aligning them with LSE’s teaching and research interests and needs. He participates in various committees both within the Library and at LSE more widely and is also a member of the steering group for the Relationship Management in HE Libraries group. Prior to joining LSE, Kevin worked at Goldsmiths, University of London and City, University of London in different roles.

Twitter: @liaisonkevin

Time:18:00-19:30
Room: A109

23 March: After Hours “Audience-Generated Content: Waste or Trace?” Zeta Kolokythopoulou

***THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELLED DUE TO THE ONGOING SITUATION WITH THE CORONAVIRUS. WE HOPE TO RE-SCHEDULE FOR THE AUTUMN TERM***

This talk will focus on the documentation value of audience-generated content that is produced during and as part of live performance works. Recent studies describe audience-generated content as a form of documentation that is equal to other types of performance documents. In so doing, they recommend researching archival strategies that can facilitate the preservation of and access to such records. Despite this, the presence of audience-generated content – particularly computational data –  in performance archives is scarce. Taking as its case study the piece Karen (2015) by Blast Theory this talk will explore how practitioners and performance archivists consider audience-generated content in the aftermath of a performance work. In so doing, it will tap into practical and organisational issues that might affect archiving strategies and will discuss what conceptual implications they might have in the field of performance documentation.

Bio: Zeta Kolokythopoulou is an early career researcher and interdisciplinary artist. Her current work focuses on audience-generated content as an organic and active trace of live performance. Zeta is more broadly interested in cyber culture and the possibilities of data in relation to themes of identity, participation, and net-neutrality.

Time:18:00-19:30
Room: A109

16 March: After Hours “Making the National Archive’s Born-Digital Collection Accessible” Leontine Talboom and Ian Henderson

***THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELLED DUE TO THE ONGOING SITUATION WITH THE CORONAVIRUS. WE HOPE TO RE-SCHEDULE FOR THE AUTUMN TERM***

The Derbyshire collection dates back to the 1990s and contains a wide variety of file and format types (WRL and CAD models, videos, documents, data and web based content), the born-digital material of this collection is accessible through the online catalogue of the National Archives, however the collection is difficult to navigate and in some instances, the data is not available. This presentation will demonstrate a number of models by which to show how the collection material could be more optimally presented online, and to give an end user a clearer understanding of the subject in context. The presentation will also focus on the wider issues surrounding access to born-digital material in archives.

Bios: Ian Henderson works within the Research Team of the Digital Archiving Department at the National Archives, and specialises in digital Audio-Visual preservation and access.

Leontine Talboom is a collaborative PhD student at University College London and The National Archives. Her project is focusing on the constraints that digital preservation practitioners are facing when making born-digital material accessible.

Twitter:@makethecatwise

Time:18:00-19:30
Room: A109

9 March: After Hours “Emerging Formats in Libraries” Giulia Carla Rossi

How does the emergence of new types of digital publications affect libraries’ collecting practices? As technology evolves, libraries must respond to the changing ways in which publishers create and make available their works. The British Library Emerging Formats Project looks at innovative forms of storytelling and the challenges they present to long-term preservation, in order to help libraries successfully manage these new complex digital objects.

Bio: Giulia Carla Rossi is Curator for Digital Publications at the British Library. With a background in eBook production and digital publishing, her current work focuses on emerging media in the UK and how new forms of storytelling are challenging existing practices in collecting institutions.

Twitter: @giugimonogatari

Time: 18:00-19:30
Room: A109

2 March: After Hours “Health Library & Knowledge services: present and future” Natasha Howard and Sue Lacey Bryant

Natasha and Sue will talk about working in NHS libraries and how they make a difference to healthcare staff and services today. Sue will draw on the findings from the Topol Review, looking to the future of healthcare and exciting opportunities for LKS staff.

Bios: Natasha Howard

As Library Manager at NELFT Natasha has developed outreach services and resources to meet the needs of a growing organisation that currently comprises over 6000 people based at 200 sites across London, Essex and Kent. She also initiated income generating contracts to provide evidence and knowledge support services to local authority public health teams. Natasha is passionate about staff development, a Chartership mentor and currently working towards Fellowship. Prior to NELFT she worked for a start-up in the City and at a healthcare charity. 

Twitter: @nhhoward 

Sue Lacey Bryant

As the National Lead for NHS Library and Knowledge Services, HEE, Sue is passionate about improving the quality of healthcare and bringing knowledge to bear on decision-making.  She draws on wide-ranging experience which spans innovative roles in knowledge management and quality improvement in primary care. Sue enjoys working across a portfolio. As Review Programme Manager Sue was immersed in the work of the Topol Review. Sue is also an executive coach. Winner of the CILIP Knowledge & Information Management Walford Award 2018, she serves on: Editorial Advisory Board, Health Information and Libraries Journal and is a CILIP Trustee

Twitter:@SueLaceyBryant

Time:18:00
Room: A109

27th February: CityLIS MPhil to PhD Transfer Seminar for Jerald Cavanagh

“Can Contribution Analysis (a Theory Based approach to evaluation) be used to evaluate, the long-term impact of EU Erasmus+ projects effectively?”

“This research aims to investigate ways in which the impact of EU and similarly funded project can be evaluated beyond the immediate conclusion of the project work. The research will be based on a sample evaluation of two projects carried out in the Western Balkans, within the field of Library Development and Information Literacy. The research will focus on the use of Contribution Analysis to prepare a Theory of Change (ToC) which will then be used to determine whether or not, or to what extend the project may be considered impactful. The potential of this approach to be used for evaluation of other projects will then be assessed.

This research may have implications for other EU projects beyond the Library and Information Literacy field and beyond the Western Balkans regions. The ability to demonstrate the impact of these Western Balkans EU funded projects may have a far reaching effect on other projects and other regions. The research will suggest methods to improve the monitoring and assessment of projects and to demonstrate the impact of projects in a more translucent way. The research may also influence the way the EU and EACEA monitor, evaluate and measure the impact of the Erasmus+ projects generally.

Openness and Transparency are key communication principles used by the EU to communicate with its citizens and stakeholders. Demonstrating the Impact of Tempus and Erasmus+ projects will help strengthen relationships with EU member states, by demonstrating accountability to the citizens, the taxpayer of the Europe Union and country partners of how money is spent on their behalf. The expenditure on Tempus and Erasmus+ projects from 2011 to 2018 is in the region of eight hundred million euro, demonstrating value for money and a social return for this investment is important.

I have been involved in Erasmus+ projects for over ten years. I have been Project Leader on three occasions and have been a project partner on five other occasions, the projects span geographically across the Western Balkans into, Eastern Europe, Russia, Central Asia and China . I have a lot of experience working on these projects and while I have seen many positive aspects to these projects, I have also identified shortcomings. These shortcomings centre on the evaluation methodology’s used to evaluate projects and the mechanisms used to demonstrate the impact that projects had.”

All welcome! Twitter: @jeraldcavanagh

Time: 12.00-13.00
Room: AG04

24th February: CityLIS One Day Practical Cataloguing Workshop 2020 led by Dr Deborah Lee

We are delighted that Debbie will lead another of her highly popular cataloguing workshops. Attendance is free but you need to book: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/citylis-cataloguing-workshop-2020-tickets-87558837841

CityLIS students only.

19th February: CityLIS Open Evening

The perfect opportunity to find out more about studying Library or Information Science at CityLIS. Our course prepares you for entry to, or progression within, the Library and Information sector.

Presentation from 17.30-18.30, followed by networking Q+A. Come and meet the CityLIS Team, and talk to current students and alumni. Book your place via the link above!

Time: 17.30-19.30
Room: AG03

17 February: After Hours Documenting the Ephemeral: an insight into the National Theatre Archive” Erin Lee

‘Performance’s only life is in the present’ (Phelan, 1993)(1)

Working in a producing theatre alongside costume and props makers, stage managers and set designers, what role can an archive have in preserving their work for future generations? This talk will look at the work of the National Theatre Archive, what it holds and how it makes it accessible to a global audience. It will consider the position of the archive within the theatre and the opportunities and challenges that this brings. The session will cover the role of an active archivist and tackle the issues of ephemerality, memory and absence touching on the field of performance studies.

(1)Peggy Phelan, Unmarked: The Politics of Performance, New York and London 1993, p.146.

Bio:Erin is Head of Archive at the National Theatre where she has worked for over 7 years. She completed her MS in Library and Information Science at Syracuse University, NY in 2012 and is currently a PhD candidate at Royal Central School of Speech and Drama exploring how performance and process can be documented.

Twitter: @wee_bookworm

Time: 18:00-19:30
Room: A109

10 February:  After Hours Curating the curator: revamping the V&A Prints and Drawings departmental library” Irene Tortorella

The talk will focus on topics such as writing a library project proposal, understanding deaccessioning policies and compiling an information needs survey.

Bio: Irene is currently Assistant Librarian, Framing and Retrieval Manager at the V&A. She has a broad range of experiences, from UK National Museums and Libraries to SaaS (Software as a Service) and PropTech (Real Estate Technology) startups, always applying and combining her interest in technology with her passion for supporting people’s information needs.

Twitter: @irenetortorell4

Time: 18:00-19:30
Room: A109

3 February: After Hours “UK Premiere of Change the Subject! Documentary” at UCL

This important documentary, sponsored by several LIS education providers,  will be hosted by our colleagues at UCL. We hope everyone studying LIS within and around London will consider attending.

This documentary (60m) tells the story of a group of students at Dartmouth College, whose singular effort at confronting anti-immigrant sentiment in their library catalog took them all the way from Baker-Berry Library to the halls of Congress.  “Change the Subject” shows how an instance of campus activism entered the national spotlight, and how a cataloging term became a flashpoint in the immigration debate on Capitol Hill.  Following the screening, there will be a short panel (Eve Lacey, Newham College, Cambridge; Ludi Price, SOAS; Tom Meehan, UCL ) that will discuss the documentary as well as related issues.

Time: Doors open at 5.30pm, screening starts at 6pm
Location: Gustave Tuck Lecture Theatre, Wilkins Building, University College, London (UCL) https://www.ucl.ac.uk/maps/gustave-tuck-lt

Attendance is free, but you must register via EventBrite: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/change-the-subject-documentary-showing-and-panel-tickets-81342859683

27th January: Screening of “Our Hobby is Depeche Mode” and Q&A with director Nick Abrahams

Time: 18.00-19.30
Room: ELG02

20th January: First day of teaching for term 2

14th January: CityLIS Online Event

Interested in finding out more about City, University of London’s courses but unable to visit the campus? Take part in one of our online events.

City’s online events are designed to provide you with all the information you need to help you make the right decision, accessible from the comfort of your own home. By attending our sessions, you will have the opportunity to:

  • Participate in live Q&As with programme leaders, admissions staff and current City students
  • Find out more about the student experience and what it’s like to be a student at City
  • Learn about student services and support available at City (including finance, accommodation, visa advice, etc.)

Register via the link above!

Time: 16:30-17:30 (GMT)
Room: Online

2019

6th December: Last day of teaching for term 1

2nd December: CityLIS Christmas Bash

Invitation only.

Time: 17.00-19.30
Room: The Pavilion

25th November: After Hours “Information in the Networked World: Futures, Facts, and Useful Fictions”  Matt Finch 

***WE REGRET THAT THIS EVENT IS NOW CANCELLED. WE WILL HOLD IT AT A LATER DATE IN TERM 2***

How do we create and maintain value in a networked world?

What happens to truth and trust in an age of competing authorities and digital disinformation?

Who will draw the new boundaries between journalism, business, and the information professions – and how?

This participatory session with guest presenter Dr Matt Finch will bring together City’s business, journalism, and information science students to explore the future of information: how we generate and acquire it, how we manage it, and how we use it to make the best possible decisions in turbulent times.

From “fake news”, long-term organisational change, and business intelligence to the biggest political debates of our day, this session will challenge assumptions, encourage fresh thinking, and build connections among students in three of the most important fields of the coming era.

Students will try their hands at generating possible future scenarios and find connections between information science, journalism, and business which will strengthen their own learning and future careers.

Bio: Matt Finch is a consultant to sectors including health, higher education, local government, and the media, and a facilitator on the Scenarios Programme at Oxford University’s Saïd Business School. He has extensive experience helping organisations to innovate and explore future challenges. Find out more at his site www.mechanicaldolphin.com

Time: 18:00-19:30
Room: A110

18th November: After Hours “The shifts and lens required of an academic librarian to work for and with the Decolonisation Movement – a UAL librarian’s story” Monica Sajeva

Our everyday practice and experience tends to be governed both by reflection-in-action and our profession’s ethics and values. However, engaging with the Decolonising the Arts Curriculum movement at UAL has placed those of us involved within a ‘critical space and place’.  This session will explore the effects of this shift on the everyday approach, response and position, while referencing a small scale PgCert study that investigates the pedagogical lens of UAL librarians within the decolonisation movement.

Bio: Monica-carmela Sajeva is an Assistant Academic Support librarian / Special Collections librarian / Design School librarian at London College of Communication library. She studied Library and Information studies at UCL and has worked at University of the Arts London (UAL) for 11 years.

Time: 18:00-19:30
Room: A109

13th November: CityLIS Open Evening

The perfect opportunity to find out more about studying Library or Information Science at CityLIS. Our course prepares you for entry to, or progression within, the Library and Information sector.

Presentation from 17.20-18.30, followed by networking Q+A. Book your place via the link above!

Time: 17.30-19.30
Room AG03

11th November: BL Labs Symposium (all day event)

All CityLIS students attending classes on Mondays will participate in this highly successful event. Please note there is no need for students to register individually, places have been reserved for you.

4th November: After Hours “Scholarly Communication, Software and Data in Research” Sarah Stewart

This session will look at digital scholarship, the impacts of big data on open research, open science and the ways open access transforms knowledge and communication.

Bio: Sarah is a data services specialist at the British Library and is a DPhil student at the Oxford Internet Institute at at Oxford University. She is also a CityLIS alumna.

Twitter: @BioStew

Time: 18:00-19:30
Room: A109

1st November: CityLIS Visit to Linklaters

28th October – 1st November Reading Week – No Scheduled Classes

21st October: After Hours “Approaching Libraries and Information Philosophically’” Dominic Dixon

The debate over whether philosophy can provide a foundation for library and information science has been ongoing since at least 1934 when James Danton published his Plea for a Philosophy of Librarianship. Since then, the debate has been mainly between social epistemology, as originally but forward by Jess Shera and Margaret Egan, and philosophy of information, which Luciano Floridi has suggested can provide the most appropriate foundation for LIS. Independent of this debate, it is important to understand the practical implications of a philosophical approach to library and information science more broadly. Therefore, this session will explore what it means to approach something philosophically, looking in particular at philosophical issues as they arise in relation to libraries and information. We will look at some different ways of conceiving of philosophy, as well as what sort of tools philosophy can provide to address these issues.

Bio: Dominic Dixon is a Research Librarian at the University of Cambridge as well as carrying out doctoral research in the Department of Library and Information Science here at City, looking at the relationship between philosophy and LIS.

Twitter: @subtractthesky

Time: 18:00-19:30
Room: A109

15th October: CityLIS Visit to Senate House Library

14th October: After Hours “Collecting the Intangible and Future Histories” Melanie Lenz

Melanie will give an overview of the V&A’s digital art collection and discuss the challenges of documenting the materiality of the immaterial. She will also consider the implications of advancements in digital tools and methods, like machine learning, on the role and responsibilities of the curator who, like librarians and archivists, are traditionally thought of as institutional gatekeepers of stories.

Bio: Melanie Lenz is a curator in the department of Digital Art, Word and Image at the V&A Museum.

Time: 18:00-19:30
Room: A109

7th October: After Hours “Plotting Paths Through Digital Minefields”  Dominic Pates

This workshop looks at the information society through a critical lens, and considers some of the ethical issues that confront us in our increasingly digitized environments. Participants will hear more about the upcoming intelligent campus, and will get to unpick some conundrums of their own.

Bio: Dominic is a Senior Educational Technologist at City’s Learning Enhancement and Development department, with a Relationship Lead responsibility with Cass, City Law School and SMCSE. He specialises in innovations in learning spaces, and has contributed to the design of key recent space developments at City, including a flagship lecture theatre and a suite of collaborative PC labs.

Twitter: @dompates

Time: 18:00-19:30
Room: A109

23rd September: First day of teaching for term 1

19th September: CityLIS 19/20 Induction Class

Time: 13.00-15.00
Room: C303 Tait Building

Events 18/19
Events 17/18
Events 16/17
Events 15/16