CityLIS Events 20/21

This page shows key dates and events for the academic year 20/21, in the Department of Library and Information Science, CityLIS, at City, University of London.

CityLIS academic term dates can be confirmed via the main City University site: https://www.city.ac.uk/about/city-information/academic-year

Due to the pandemic, all CityLIS events for the academic year 20/21 will take place online.

This Events listing includes our new “Workplace Forum” seminar series, which puts a spotlight on professional issues and career development.

If you need any further information, or would like to suggest an event, please contact Joseph Dunne-Howrie [joseph.dunne-howrie@city.ac.uk].

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2021

2nd June: CityLIS Open Evening

We look forward to chatting with those of you interested in joining CityLIS for the academic year 21/22. This event is offered as part of the wider City University Postgraduate Open Evening events, so please book your free place via the link above.

Members of the CityLIS team will be online to offer advice and answer questions about our library or information science master’s courses, and the wider view of work as an information professional.

Twitter: @CityLIS

20th May: CityLIS FanLIS Research Symposium  “Building bridges: exploring interdisciplinary intersections between fandom, fan studies and library and information science“.

Our inaurgural FanLIS Symposium was cancelled from 2020, due to the pandemic. We are delighted to have rearranged this event online, and we hope everyone interested in the intersection between LIS and Fan Studies will join us! Registration is free, and will open on 1st March 2021.

Time: 13.00-18.15 BST
Room: Online

1 April: CityLIS Research Seminar “LGBTQ+ History at the Bishopsgate Institute” Stefan Dickers

Bishopsgate Institute’s Special Collections and Archives holds one of the most extensive collections on LGBTQ+ history, politics and culture in the UK. It covers the late nineteenth century onwards. The collections encompass LGBTQ+ history politics and culture, with archives from numerous organisations and individuals. The Institute is also the proud custodian of the Lesbian and Gay Newsmedia Archive (LAGNA), including over 350,000 press cuttings from the straight press regarding LGBTQ+ history from the 1890s to today. We hold a library of around 15,000 LGBTQ+ titles, from academic works, biographies, fiction and poetry to pulp fiction, along with over 700 journal titles from around the world. The LGBTQ+ Pamphlet Collection contains around 3,500 items including programmes for festivals and events, material from campaigning organisations and catalogues. The collection also features extensive ephemera such as club flyers, t-shirts, banners and badges. The Institute’s Special Collections and Archives also hosts the UK Leather and Fetish Archive, a national collection documenting the history and heritage of fetish, kink and BDSM in the UK. These archives contain organisational papers, flyers, journals, pamphlets, books and artefacts. Join Special Collections and Archives Manager Stef Dickers to hear how the collections were gathered, the stories behind many of the collections and adventures of looking after the collections day to day.

Bio: Stefan is the Special Collections and Archives Manager and has been responsible for the development of the Institute’s collections on the history of London, protest and activism and LGBTQ+ Britain. He qualified as an archivist in 2001 and started at Bishopsgate in 2005. Previous to this, Stefan worked in the archives of the London School of Economics and Senate House Library. 

Twitter: @BishopsgateInst & @stefdickers

Time: 16.00-17.00
Room: Online

29 March: CityLIS Workplace Forum “Beyond Cataloguing: Working in a Discovery and Metadata Team in an Academic Library” Emma Booth and Kathryn Sullivan”

In this session you will hear from a Metadata Specialist and a Discovery Manager about the broad variety and scope of metadata and discovery work in academic libraries.

Emma will share her experiences of working in several cataloguing and metadata jobs, creating and managing high quality descriptive metadata for supporting end-user discovery and access to library resources. She will talk about her current role as an E-Resources Metadata Specialist, and how she manages large-scale metadata enrichment projects to improve the discoverability of electronic collections, from e-book and e-journal packages, to multimedia streaming services and Digital Archival Collections.

Kathryn will provide a manager’s perspective of the variety of work undertaken by a Discovery and Metadata Team in a National Research Library, ranging from more traditional cataloguing responsibilities (including rare print and special collections cataloguing), to newer metadata creation and curation activities in areas such as TEI metadata for digital objects in Manchester Digital Collections, and Dublin Core metadata for academic research outputs within a Current Research Information System (CRIS).

The session will include time for participants to ask any questions they might have about working in metadata and discovery within an academic library environment.

Bio: Kathryn has been the Discovery Manager at University of Manchester Library since 2013, and is responsible for leading the Discovery and Metadata team, a significant component of the Collection Strategies Division. Kathryn has previously worked at UCLan, University of Salford, British Council, and Wigan & Leigh College, and has been involved with cataloguing and metadata work for 34 years. Kathryn is co-chair of the Northern Collaboration Special interest groups for Metadata and UX, and is committee secretary for the CILIP Metadata & Discovery Group.

Twitter: @KatSullivan3

Bio: Emma began her library career as a graduate trainee at the National Art Library (V&A Museum) in 2011 and, since completing an MA in Library & Information Studies at UCL, has worked in cataloguing and metadata roles at the Foyle Special Collections Library (Kings College London), the LSE Library, and the University of Manchester Library. Emma is on both the National Acquisitions Group (NAG) exec committee and the CILIP Metadata & Discovery Group committee.

Twitter: @EmmaE_B

Time: 16.00-17.00
Room: Online

26 March: CityLIS Research Seminar “Documenting Fashion” Rachel Cummings

Rachel’s PhD research draws on the work of Paul Otlet, Suzanne Briet and Michael Buckland to consider how objects can be defined as documents in the context of fashion, and the broader need for fashion collections and documents. Since we are now in a digital age, she is exploring online fashion collections, documents, and exhibitions. Rachel will also share her emerging area of investigation into the information behaviour of fashion students.

Bio: Rachel is a PhD candidate at CityLIS. She studied History at Florida Atlantic University and is alumnus of the LIS masters’ programme at City.

Twitter:@rachelannec1

Time: 16.00-17.00
Room: Online

22 March: CityLIS Workplace Forum “This Stand-Up Comedian Walks into an Archive…” Oliver Double

The British Stand-Up Comedy Archive was established at the University of Kent in 2013 to celebrate, preserve, and provide access to the archives and records of British stand-up comedy and comedians. In this talk, Oliver Double will recall how the archive got started, show images of some of the bewildering range of artefacts it contains, and explain what these can tell us about the art and craft of stand-up comedy. He will also discuss the difficulties and challenges of trying to archive stand-up, which is so firmly rooted in the moment of live performance.

Bio: Oliver Double has been at the University of Kent since 1999, teaching and researching comic and popular performance. Before becoming an academic, he worked as a stand-up comedian on the national comedy circuit (‘Delightful’ –The Guardian), and set up the Last Laugh, Sheffield’s longest running comedy club. He continues to perform occasionally, for example in his one-man shows Saint Pancreas (2006) and Break a Leg (2015), and the monthly comedy club Funny Rabbit. He has written a number of books, chapters and articles on stand-up, alternative comedy, variety theatre and popular performance, and helped to establish the British Stand-Up Comedy Archive (BSUCA), based at Kent’s Templeman Library.

Twitter: @Oliver_Double

Time: 16.00-17.00
Room: Online

19 March: CityLIS Research Seminar “LIS and Epistemic Normativity” Dominic Dixon

*** DUE TO UNFORESEEN CIRCUMSTANCES THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELLED. APOLOGIES FOR THE INCONVENIENCE***

Given the social nature of LIS practice and its concern with knowledge, some have argued that social epistemology – which shifts the focus of epistemology from individualistic to social – should serve as its philosophical foundation. This view has been challenged partly on the basis that social epistemology is necessarily normative with respect to knowledge while LIS is not. That is, social epistemology aims to evaluate knowledge-related social practices and make prescriptions about what counts as knowledge, while LIS does and should not. In this seminar, I will look at this debate in detail, examine the nature of normativity in LIS and argue that LIS can and should be epistemically normative. From this, I will show, it follows that any philosophical foundation for LIS must draw on — and contribute to — research in social epistemology.

Bio: Dominic Dixon is a Research Librarian at the University of Cambridge and is carrying out doctoral research at CityLIS, looking at the relationship between philosophy and LIS.

Twitter: @subtractthesky

Time: 16.00-17.00
Room: Online

15 March: CityLIS Workplace Forum “Fair Museum Jobs: Challenging exploitative recruitment practices in the museum sector” Tom Hopkins

The precarity of employment within the GLAM and heritage sectors has formed an environment in which exploitative and exclusory labour and recruitment practices have flourished. Low pay, overly demanding personal specifications for junior-level openings, and credentialism are all too familiar. Fair Museum Jobs is grassroots, collective organisation that was formed in 2018 to openly challenge these and other poor practices whilst championing and calling for positive change. Find out more about how we started, how we campaign, our successes and failures, and what we can all do to transform our sector to be a fairer place.

Bio: After graduating with an MA in Classics, Tom Hopkins began his career as a trainee at Worcester Cathedral Library and Archive. Since then, he has jumped between several short-term and often under-paid contracts across various museums, before being appointed as Curator of Aircraft and Exhibits at the Royal Air Force Museum in 2019. He is one of the co-founders of Fair Museum Jobs.

Twitter: @TMPHopkins1

Time: 16.00-17.00
Room: Online

12 March: CityLIS Research Seminar “Art as Information and Documentation” Tim Gorichanaz

With digital technologies have come new art forms, broadly called information arts. But if information is something we can learn from, something that shapes us, then all art has always been informational. This explains how we can come away from certain works of art feeling that we’ve learned something, even if art doesn’t inform us in the way that Wikipedia articles and the news do. In this seminar, I’ll conceptualize art as information and connect this with document theory, sharing some of my prior research and pointing to inroads for future work.

Bio: Tim Gorichanaz, Ph.D., is Assistant Teaching Professor in Information Science in the College of Computing & Informatics at Drexel University. His research explores information experience and ethics, particularly in the domains of personally meaningful activities. His book Information Experience in Theory and Design (Emerald, 2020) provides a recent statement of his work in this area.

Twitter: @timgorichanaz

Time: 16.00-17.00
Room: Online

8 March: CityLIS Workplace Forum “History of the Bishopsgate Institute” Stefan Dickers

Bishopsgate Institute Special Collections and Archives document the experiences of everyday people, and the extraordinary individuals and organisations who have strived for social, political and cultural change. Since the archive opened to the public in 1895 it has been steadily growing, with unique collections being gifted and loaned. Some are London focused, but the lives they preserve and the issues they explore have national and global resonance. We are now home to internationally consulted special collections and archives on the history of London, protest and activism, women’s and feminist history and the history of LGBTQ+ Britain. The collections offer both breadth and depth. They hold 150,000 books, pamphlets, maps and photographs of London. The Lesbian and Gay Newsmedia Archive (LAGNA) alone holds 350,000 press cuttings. The photographic archives over 500,000 images. They have a growing oral-history archive and the collections contain fascinating ephemera, from banners and badges to club flyers and condoms. Join Special Collections and Archives Manager Stef Dickers to hear how the collections were gathered, the stories behind many of the collections and adventures of looking after the collections day to day.

Bio: Stefan is the Special Collections and Archives Manager and has been responsible for the development of the Institute’s collections on the history of London, protest and activism and LGBTQ+ Britain. He qualified as an archivist in 2001 and started at Bishopsgate in 2005. Previous to this, Stefan worked in the archives of the London School of Economics and Senate House Library.

Twitter: @BishopsgateInst & @stefdickers

Time: 16.00-17.00
Room: Online

5 March: CityLIS Research Seminar “The Internet as a Performance Medium” Joseph Dunne-Howrie

Lockdown has opened up a new frontier for theatre-makers who wish to experiment with expanding the communication space of performance into cyberspace. Shows such as Forced Entertainment’s End Meeting For All frame the grid of screens on Zoom as a collage of encounters between six connected yet distant bodies, each one inhabiting a reality that never fully converges into a communal experience, whilst Dead Centre’s To Be A Machine turns the audience into data subjects by having them present as recorded video footage and as viewers watching the performance as a live stream on Vimeo. Other examples to cite include Gob Squad’s Show Me A Good Time, Nathan Ellis’s work_txt_home, Coney’s Telephone, and Dante Or Die’s USER NOT FOUND. Joseph will reflect on the significance of these theatrical innovations for thinking about the internet as an artistic medium with reference to the DocPerform webinar “Internet Theatre”.

Twitter: @MemoryDetritus

Time: 16.00-17.00
Room: Online

1 March: CityLIS Workplace Forum “Top Ten Research Tips” Petra Killoran

We sometimes miss the simple and dare I say, the obvious little steps, that can help us along the way. As a former student, I will share my practical advice on how to manage and organise yourselves and your stress levels, when researching and writing assignments/dissertations.

Bio: Petra Killoran (She, Her) BA (Hons) Ed Studies from Bath Spa University and City University London Library Science MSc Alumna and current PhD student. A firm believer in aspirations via education and reading for children and young people, she is currently an Academic Liaison Librarian at the University for the Creative Arts, Farnham. Here, she teaches research skills and manages collections for the Schools of Photography, Fine Art and Visual Communications and the School of Craft & Design. Previous positions include, Assistant Academic Librarian at UAL Central St Martins, London, Administrative assistant for Hants Schools Inspectorate and Advisory Service, 28 years as a school librarian, Learning/Speech and Language Support Assistant, HLTA and administrative roles across many UK and military forces schools. Personal philosophy, ‘It is never too late to learn, aspire to improve yourself or chase that dream.’

Twitter: @PetraKilloran

Time: 16.00-17.00
Room: Online

19 February: CityLIS Research Seminar “‘Picture this’: a practical look at using photo-elicitation as part of the research process” Ian Rodwell

Although there is growing interest in how visual research methodologies can provide a richer understanding of organisational life, there are still relatively few published empirical studies. In this seminar, I’ll explain how I used participant-led photography — combined with a recently developed framework called GVPA — to explore the extent to which organisational storytelling is drawn to liminal spaces. I’ll share what attracted me to photography as an approach; the benefits of the process (in terms of the insights generated, the agency of participants and the flow and cadence of the research interview); and the challenges (and practical points to be aware of) when seeking ethics approval and instructing participants. I’ll conclude with my ‘lessons learnt’ and how I aim to enact them in the next stage of my research.

Bio: Ian Rodwell is Head of Client Knowledge and Learning at Linklaters, a global law firm. He provides training and guidance to the firm’s clients – global corporates, banks, governments – on an extensive range of business skills topics. These encompass knowledge exploitation, collaboration, high-performing teams, creativity, the role of trust, motivational leadership, virtual working, negotiation and the business use of stories. Ian has delivered masterclasses globally and advised clients on the design of offsites, away days and overarching learning programmes. He is also an experienced coach with assignments both within Linklaters and externally.Ian is also a research student at City University exploring liminal space and organisational storytelling.

www.liminalnarratives.com
Twitter: @liminalnarrate

Time: 16.00-17.00
Room: Online

17th February: CityLIS Open Evening

We look forward to chatting with those of you interested in joining CityLIS for the academic year 21/22. This event is offered as part of the wider City University Postgraduate Open Evening events, so please book your free place via the link above.

Members of the CityLIS team will be online to offer advice and answer questions about our library or information science master’s courses, and the wider view of work as an information professional.

Twitter: @CityLIS

Time: 17.00-18.30
Room: Online

16 February: CityLIS DocPerform Webinar “Internet Theatre”

Register via Eventbrite

The Covid-19 pandemic has forced theatre-makers to produce work online. In distinction from streaming live and recorded shows, theatre and performance produced for the internet represents a new frontier for artists.

Shows such as Forced Entertainment’s End Meeting For All frame the grid of screens on Zoom as a collage of encounters between six connected yet distant bodies, each one inhabiting a reality that never fully converges into a communal experience, whilst Dead Centre’s To Be A Machine turns the audience into data subjects by having them present as recorded video footage and as viewers watching the performance as a live stream on Vimeo. Other examples of internet theatre include Gob Squad’s Show Me A Good Time, New Diorama and Nathan Ellis’s work_txt_home, Coney’s Telephone, and Dante Or Die’s USER NOT FOUND.

This webinar has been organised to begin developing new discourses of ‘the digital’ beyond questions of liveness and ephemerality to explore how the internet has become a performance medium in its own right. The panel will explore ideas relating to the spectator as a data subject, digital intimacy, and writing plays and devising shows for performance in cyberspace with reference to pieces produced during the lockdown.

DocPerform is an interdisciplinary project based in the Department of Library and Information Science at City, University of London. DocPerform investigates new and emerging documentation technologies used in the performing arts, the performativity of digital information, and concepts of theatricality and unreality as they relate to the contemporary information environment.

Twitter: @DocPerform

Time: 18.30-20.30
Room: Online

15 February: CityLIS Workplace Forum “How do I get a job in the library and information profession?” Lyn Robinson

In this presentation we will take a look at the landscape for employment with the field of library and information science. The session is designed for those with little or no prior experience in the sector, and will consider the knowledge, skills and values regarded as core to our expertise, alongside existing frameworks for skills and professional development, ways to find job advertisements, and some hints and tips for career success.

Bio: Lyn is Head of Library and Information Science (CityLIS), at City, University of London. She is also Programme Director for our master’s courses in Library Science and Information Science.

Twitter: @lynrobinson

Time: 16.00-17.00
Room: Online

12 February: CityLIS Research Seminar “Impact Evaluation of Information Literacy initiatives: Case study of EU Erasmus+ projects in the Western Balkans” Jerald Cavanagh

This research aims to investigate ways in which the impact of EU and similarly funded project can be evaluated beyond the immediate conclusion of the project work. The research is based on a sample evaluation of two projects carried out in the Western Balkans, within the field of Library Development and Information Literacy. The research is focus on the use of Contribution Analysis to prepare a Theory of Change (ToC) which will then be used to determine whether or not, or to what extend the project may be considered impactful. The potential of this approach to be used for evaluation of other projects will then be assessed. This research may have implications for other EU projects beyond the Library and Information Literacy field and beyond the Western Balkans regions. The ability to demonstrate the impact of these Western Balkans EU funded projects may have a far reaching effect on other projects and other regions. The research will suggest methods to improve the monitoring and assessment of projects and to demonstrate the impact of projects in a more translucent way.  Openness and Transparency are key communication principles used by the EU to communicate with its citizens and stakeholders. Demonstrating the Impact of Tempus and Erasmus+ projects will help strengthen report on outcomes and outputs of the projects but will examine how they affected participants, what was gained, what worked and what did not, and did the expectations meet the reality.

Bio: Jerald Cavanagh BSc Econ, MSc, MA is Director of Library Services at Limerick Institute of Technology, Limerick, Ireland. He is a librarian by profession and has qualifications to Master’s Level, including MA in Educational Planning and Management (Honours) from the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) UNESCO, Paris as well as MSc in Learning Technologies (Honours) (2005) from the National College of Ireland (NCI) and a Post graduate qualification in e-Learning. He has a BSc Econ in Information and Library studies for the University of Wales, Aberystwyth. He is project leader of several large-scale European Union funded projects. These include major international projects involving the capacity building and modernisation of libraries and the development of Information Literacy in regions such as the Western Balkans, Eastern Europe, China, Russia, and Central Asia, among others. His interest in impact evaluation and the importance of measuring impact contribution stems from his long association with managing projects.  Jerald has been instrumental in promoting new technologies and service concepts in libraries and is project leader in several project including 3D printing support service for innovative citizens. This project teaches Librarians to take the lead in training the library users in the use of 3D Printing technologies. Another innovative project entitled Introducing Intellectual Property Education for Lifelong Learning and the Knowledge Economy is aimed at introducing education in the field of Intellectual Property, in the curriculum of Technical Universities, through training librarians and teaching support staff in Intellectual property applications and concepts. Jerald has received numerous awards for his work in LIS field, including the European Projects Association award for Distinguished effort in the Development of the European Union through European Projects and for efforts in building a better society.  He won awards at the Irish Education Award for Best International Research Project Collaboration and the Best Library Team in 2018.

Jerald is currently a doctoral research student with CityLIS.

Twitter: @jeraldcavanagh

Time: 16.00-17.00
Room: Online

8 February: CityLIS Workplace Forum “Notes from the field: working as an embedded librarian in a multidisciplinary research group” Dominic Dixon

In this session, I will share my experiences of working as an embedded librarian in a multidisciplinary research group based at the University of Cambridge. I will compare the embedded model of librarianship with the more traditional, discuss the challenges involved, and look at the skills and experience – both academic and professional – that are necessary to succeed in such a role.

Bio: Dominic Dixon is a Research Librarian at the University of Cambridge and is carrying out doctoral research at CityLIS, looking at the relationship between philosophy and LIS.

Time: 16.00-17.00
Room: Online

1 February: CityLIS Workplace Forum “Working in an Academic Library” Tyabba Siddiqui and Ludi Price

What’s it like to work in an academic library? Ludi and Tia share their experiences of working in two academic libraries in very different roles. Learn more about being responsible for managing a patron-facing team on the ground, dealing with specialist information needs as a subject librarian, or handling data and cataloguing tasks. This will be an interactive discussion with lots of room for participants to ask any questions they might have about working in libraries and information roles within an academic environment.

Bios: Ludi is the subject librarian for China & Inner Asia at SOAS, University of London, and was previously Far Eastern Cataloguer there for 6 years. She is also a Visiting Lecturer at CityLIS, City, University of London, where she completed her Ph.D. in the information behaviour of media fans.

Bios: Tia is the Weekend Librarian at London College of Fashion, University of Arts London. She has previously worked in medical libraries, public libraries, and the British Library. She is also a Visiting Lecturer at CityLIS, City, University of London, where she attained her MSc in Information Science

Time: 16.00-17.00
Room: Online

29 January: CityLIS Research Seminar “Section 28, Black History Month and representation in public libraries” Colette Townend

My CityLIS dissertation looked at the evolution of library services for LGBTQ and Black communities since the 1980s. Particularly looking at Section 28 and Black History Month as the result of local government work on equalities at the time. The legacies of this era on library services are felt today, with annual Black History Month and LGBTQ+ History Month celebrations programmed. Whether these events and specific collections celebrate or separate communities is an ongoing discussion and can be a fine balance to get right. Diverse representation in publishing, particularly for children has been a renewed subject of discussion, and this, along with means of supply and library policy in turn affects what ends up on library shelves. Community librarianship, a concept first introduced in the mid 1970s suggested that all in the community should see themselves represented in library services, be that events, collections or any other user needs. But how much do public libraries provide this today? The session will be investigating this history, discussing these issues and more.

Bio: Colette graduated from CityLIS in 2020 and has worked as a librarian at Lambeth Libraries since 2013, before that working at local authority library services across London including Merton, Croydon and Enfield. She was a founder of radical social centre DIY Space For London and is co-organising the Recording It Ourselves conference on DIY cultures, information, archives and histories https://recordingitourselves.wordpress.com/ which takes place 20 March 2021.

Time: 16.00-17.00
Room: Online
Twitter: @Colette_LIS

25 January: CityLIS Workplace Forum “Reading in Rainbow” Isadore Auerbach George

A discussion of Isadore’s work to promote reading by and for LGBTIQ+ people, both in his work as a school librarian, and with the project he started during his time at CityLIS, ‘Book 28 Library’. There will be lots of times for questions and advice.

Bio: Isadore is a recent CityLIS graduate who now works as a school librarian at a secondary school in Haringey. He is passionate about critical librarianship, literacy and linguistics. He is also the director of Book 28 Library, a queer library service housed at the Outside Project LGBTIQ+ Community Centre and Homeless Shelter, down the road from City University.

www.isadoreauerbachgeorge.com/blog
Twitter: @SadoreLi

Time:16.00-17.00
Room: Online

18th January: First day of teaching for term 2

2020

11th December: Last day of teaching for term 1

7th December: CityLIS Workplace Forum “Making the National Archive’s Born-Digital Collection Accessible” Leontien Talboom and Ian Henderson

The Derbyshire collection dates back to the 1990s and contains a wide variety of file and format types (WRL and CAD models, videos, documents, data and web based content), the born-digital material of this collection is accessible through the online catalogue of the National Archives, however the collection is difficult to navigate and in some instances, the data is not available. This presentation will demonstrate a number of models by which to show how the collection material could be more optimally presented online, and to give an end user a clearer understanding of the subject in context. The presentation will also focus on the wider issues surrounding access to born-digital material in archives.

Bios: Ian Henderson works within the Research Team of the Digital Archiving Department at the National Archives, and specialises in digital Audio-Visual preservation and access.

Leontine Talboom is a collaborative PhD student at University College London and The National Archives. Her project is focusing on the constraints that digital preservation practitioners are facing when making born-digital material accessible.

Twitter: @makethecatwise

Time: 16.00-17.00
Room: Online

16th November: CityLIS Workplace Forum “Public Libraries during times of cuts, closures and pandemics or ‘Life During Wartime’ (Apologies to Talking Heads)” Alan Wylie

***THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELLED***

Since 2010 approximately 800 libraries have closed, 10.000 staff have lost their jobs with those remaining being asked to do more with less. How can we as Library Workers debunk the ‘resilience’ narrative, reclaim our ethos and refocus on social justice?

Bio: Alan has worked in public libraries for over thirty years and has been a Librarian in Islington Libraries since 2002. Prior to working for Islington Libraries, Alan worked for Hackney and Waltham Forest Libraries in different roles including as a Reference Librarian and a Cataloguer. Alan sat on the SCOOP committee of CILIP for many years and is currently the Libraries Workforce Rep on the DCMS Libraries Taskforce. In his spare time he is also a Library Campaigner and was a member of Voices for the Library and the Speak up for Libraries national steering committee.

Twitter: @wylie_alan

Time: 16:00-17:00
Room: Online

11th November: CityLIS Online Open Evening

We look forward to chatting with those of you interested in joining CityLIS for the academic year 21/22. This event is offered as part of the wider City University Postgraduate Open Evening events, so please book your free place via the link above.

Members of the CityLIS team will be online to offer advice and answer questions about our library or information science master’s courses, and the wider view of work as an information professional.

Twitter: @CityLIS

Time: 17.00-18.30
Room: Online

9th November: CityLIS Workplace Forum “Working with Collections Data: Two Projects at LSE (2017-2019)” Kevin Wilson

LSE Library’s collections are recognised for their outstanding national and international importance and have been awarded Designation status by the Arts Council. The Library’s collections cover the breadth of the social sciences and are designed to reflect the teaching, learning and research needs of LSE. In the last two years, Kevin has undertaken two extensive projects looking at LSE Library’s collections. The first was to test how our collections truly reflected teaching, learning and research as part of a wider collection evaluation project. This involved combining catalogue (ALMA), online reading list (Talis Aspire) and institutional repository data and looking at this from a Library of Congress classmark level. More recently, Kevin is working on updating LSE Library’s collection development policies through an EDI (Equity, Diversity and Inclusion) lens, and has reviewed the diversity of the LSE Library’s collections and reading lists through a combination of ALMA and Talis Aspire data. This work contributes to the decolonisation discussions occurring at LSE and will have benefits for academic staff wishing to decolonise their teaching.

Bio: Kevin has worked in academic libraries for over fifteen years and has been the Academic Liaison and Collection Development Manager at LSE since July 2017. He leads LSE Library’s liaison activity with over twenty departments and many more research centres, managing a team of 3.4 Academic Support Librarians. He also leads on the development, management and promotion of the Library’s collections, with particular focus on aligning them with LSE’s teaching and research interests and needs. He participates in various committees both within the Library and at LSE more widely and is also a member of the steering group for the Relationship Management in HE Libraries group. Prior to joining LSE, Kevin worked at Goldsmiths, University of London and City, University of London in different roles.

Twitter: @liaisonkevin

Time: 16:00-17:00
Room: Online

September 28th: First day of teaching for term 1

September 24th: CityLIS Induction Class

 


Events 19/20
Events 18/19
Events 17/18
Events 16/17
Events 15/16