More Books: You choose, we’re all ears

We're all ears

Since 2013, CityLibrary has given students the chance to help choose the books we have through the More Books scheme.  So far, just over 2000 books have been bought.   You can find a selection of these on display on Levels 4 and 5 of the Northampton Square Library, as well as below in our virtual display.

Books on all kinds of subjects have been bought covering many courses taught at City.  From health sciences to law to engineering, psychology, history, English, maths, computing and beyond, there is something for everyone.

You can get in on the act by filling out the More Books form online (or the Read for Research one if you are a research student) here.  Tell us what’s missing from the collections, whether it’s a classic text you think every library should have, or a title that just never seems to be on the shelf when you need it.

The scheme was set up in response to student’s wanting to have more control over books that were bought for the library.  To see what else Library Services have done to improve the student experience, check out the Student Survey section on the Student Hub.

Thomson Reuters Room at Cass Library, Bunhill Row, closed between 1st and 8th of April

The Thomson Reuters Room (R1010) is going to be closed for a week from 1st April. The room is being refurnished, so when it opens up again on 8th April, you’ll have new and better furniture to make using the room more comfortable. Eikon PCs in the room will be unavailable during this period. You can find 5 more Eikon PCs in Cass Library, which you can book online for up to two hours at a time, and 2 at our Northampton Square campus, which you can also book.

You can find locations of alternative PCs for general use around Cass on IT Services’ website.

Room 1010, Bunhill Row

Return of 24/7 opening

The Northampton Square and Cass libraries will open for 24 hours a day, 7 days a week during City’s main exam and assessment period.

Open 24 hours graphic, red text on black background.

Cass Learning Resource Centre:

Monday 25th March – Friday 3rd May

Northampton Square Library:

Tuesday 23rd April – Friday 31st May

Bookable study spaces will be available at both sites to reserve a seat in advance. At Northampton Square our Occupancy Chart will be back on Level 2 so you’ll know which floors are currently busier than others, plus each library will have additional security staff working through the night.

We’ll also be running our #TakeABreak campaign throughout 24/7 offering tips, advice, puzzles, colour-me-calm sheets and a weekly prize draw, all to encourage you to pause, refresh and recharge in between.

Image of puzzles and sudokus
Pick up a puzzle

Thanks to everyone in advance for showing consideration to local residents when entering and exiting university buildings through the night, this goes a long way to helping ensure we can stay open for longer at this busy time of year.

Detailed opening times can be found on the Library website.

Good luck everyone.

Behind the scenes of The Story of City: The Financial Ledger

One of the more challenging objects in City’s 125th anniversary exhibition was a mysterious ledger found in the archives. The leather-bound book, simply labelled ‘Private’, was fastened with a brass lock, for which the key has long been lost.

Keen to discover the ledger’s secrets, we contacted several locksmiths and book conservators. They identified a number of issues with opening the lock – given the tiny size of the key, reproducing it would be very fine and detailed work. The brass construction of the lock also posed problems for conventional lock-picking, as there was a risk of damaging the fairly soft metal.

Ultimately, our conservator recommended a locksmith who specialises in historical locks. The book was taken off-site, and a new key was produced. Unfortunately, due to the age of the item, the reproduction key became jammed in the lock. The ledger was ultimately opened, although with some damage to the locking mechanism; this is sometimes an unavoidable consequence of working with fragile and complex archival objects.

What we found inside the ledger justified the unfortunate damage to the object. Dating back to 1891, the financial records cover almost every aspect of the first years of City, from its conception, to its building, and through to the early activities of the first Principal, Dr Robert Mullineux Walmsley. Our conservator felt the pages were in such good condition, it was likely that the ledger had not been opened for at least a hundred years.

Financial records like this often contain information that is otherwise lost to history. For example, while we knew that the Great Hall was used for public ‘entertainments’, we had very few records of what these involved. From the pages below, we can see that the Hall was used for boxing and gymnastics competitions, band performances, and public lectures. Of course, sometimes these records prompt more questions than they answer – what were the ‘police entertainments’ mentioned in 1903? Who were Miss White and Miss James?

Despite these mysteries, these records form an invaluable link to City’s past. They provide avenues for further investigation in other archives around London, as well as adding colour and richness to City’s story. Bringing these records together in our exhibition illustrates our history as a place of learning, a social enterprise, and a proud contributor to our vibrant Islington community. You can browse selected pages from the ledger below – what will you discover?

  • Financial ledger cover brown tooled suede with brass clasp.
    Financial ledger cover

 

You can see this ledger, along with many other treasures from City’s archive, in our exhibition The Story of City: life, learning and legacy. The first part is in the Pavilion until the end of June 2019; a second part of the exhibition will follow in July, and run until the end of the year.

The Annual Register: a record of world events

The Annual Register is a year-by-year record of British and world events, published annually since 1758.

From 1758 to 1789, Edmund Burke was the editor and main contributor to this publication.  The Annual Register, as well as being a record of events, used to include reviews of important books, reproduction of state papers, historical sketches, poetry and observations on natural history.

After 1775, the history section of the Annual Register increased significantly and became the main focus of the publication.  In the 1920s, the content of the Annual Register changed to the format that it is still used today, opening with the history of Britain, followed by a section on foreign history, then chronicles of events, a brief retrospective of the year’s cultural and economic developments, and obituaries of esteemed people who died in the year.

City, University of London Library provides access to the online version of the Annual Register, which includes each volume published since 1758.

Screenshot of Annual Register published in 1946

 

The Annual Register is a valuable source of information for History, International Politics and Journalism students.

You can browse the different volumes of the publication, check the table of content and open the PDF of the relevant chapter.  Alternatively enter your keywords to retrieve all the documents, included in the Annual Register, that focus on the topic of your research.

Annual Register - basic search page

 

 

Email reminders

Last night’s upgrade to our system prevented our email reminders from being sent out.  Our suppliers are working to resolve this and we will send them out later today.  In the mean time, you can log in to your Library Account to view the due dates of your items and renew them if necessary.

Library system downtime: March 11th-12th

We are upgrading our library systems overnight Monday 11th – Tuesday 12th March.  As a result you may experience intermittent periods of downtime during which you will be unable to:

  • login to online resources
  • see book availability through CityLibrary Search
  • request items, or
  • login to your CityLibrary Account to renew items.

Please plan ahead to conduct research and manage your account ahead of this time.

CEPR Discussion Papers

The Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR) is an independent, non-profit organisation, that was founded in 1983 “to enhance the quality of economic policy-making within Europe and beyond, by fostering high quality, policy-relevant economic research, and disseminating it widely to decision-makers in the public and private sectors.”

The CEPR’s network of Research Fellows and Affiliates includes more than 1,300 economists doing research on issues affecting the European economy.  The results of their research are disseminated via the CEPR Discussion Papers series.

The Centre produces more than 800 Discussion Papers each year.  These papers can be browsed either by year or by programme areas, which include: Labour Economics; Public Economics; Financial Economics; Development Economics; Monetary Economics and Macroeconomics.

Our suscription gives you full-text access to the latest CEPR Discussion Papers.  You will also be able to browse the CEPR’s archive of over 12,000 Discussion Papers from 1984 to present and download the documents in PDF format.

Screenshot of CEPR Discussion Papers