LibKey Nomad, a useful tool for research

Searching for articles? LibKey Nomad is what you need!

LibKey Nomad is the Chrome browser extension from Browzine that will help you find copies of either Open Access articles or articles that City subscribes to.

 

You can download the LibKey Nomad extension from the Chrome Store.

You just need to select your institution (City, University of London) then it will pop up with a link in the bottom left corner of your browser when it finds a copy of an article.

 

To get further details about how to use LibKey, take a look at this online guide, and get set for article adventures!

Reduced hours

Library Services is 100% committed to supporting both the study needs and wellbeing of all of our students, staff and library users.

With this in mind, we’re making a number of changes to how we do things in order to make sure your access to resources and services continues with as minimal disruption as possible throughout the coming weeks:

Library closure, increased online services

From 5pm Friday 20th March the Northampton Square Library will be closed until further notice  – all opening times can be found on our website.

  • We have extended our Online Chat hours to 09:00-17:00, Monday to Friday.

 

 

Print resources

All physical items borrowed since 9th March have had the loan period extended and now won’t be due back until 1st June.

Library themed word cloud.Online resources

Library Services subscribe to a wide range of online resources and e-books and we’ve spent the last couple of weeks increasing our e-book availability as much as we can; we’re also working closely with publishers to try gain extra access to titles and publications too.

If an item you need is not available online, please contact us via library@city.ac.uk or on 020 7040 8191 to discuss what options might be available.

Subject, service and resource specific Library Guides are also available online as well as our Ask Us section, and these are constantly monitored and updated.

CityLibrary News and Social Media

We will also do our best to keep you up to date with what’s happening via CityLibrary News and social media including Twitter (@CityUniLibrary).

Copyright and Online Teaching

The following information about copyright has been compiled by Library Services to assist academic staff in preparing online material for students.

Copyright Guide: City has a Copyright Guide. There is a section about Copyright and Lecturing; a lot of the information there is also applicable to preparing resources for online teaching.

Digital course readings service: Scans of extracts from certain books and journals can be made available to students via links in Reading Lists Online, using the digital course readings service. Currently the library may be able to help academics make available larger extracts from books and journals than is normally the case, although scans will need to be provided from academics’ copies (as librarians do not have access to the books in the library at the moment). Academics should contact their subject librarian to discuss this. The Digitisation Team can also be contacted about this (digilib@city.ac.uk). More information about this service can be found at this webpage: https://libraryservices.city.ac.uk/resources/digital-course-reading.

Legal exceptions: The law permits staff and students to copy material from published works for research and private study, quotation, and educational purposes, without asking permission from publishers. You may only copy as much as is required, and in total must not copy more than 10% from any published resource.

Assistance with accessing resources: If staff and students are unable to access anything they need from the Library, they should contact us via our online chat service, which is staffed Monday-Friday, 9am – 5pm, or send us an email (library@city.ac.uk) or submit their enquiry through the Ask Us service at any time. Library staff will see if they can find a solution.

Broadcast material: City subscribes to a resource called Box of Broadcasts which has an archive of over two million TV and radio broadcasts that can be used for educational purposes. You can put links to the broadcasts in Moodle, Reading Lists Online, emails, etc. Box of Broadcasts is not normally available outside of the UK; however until the end of July 2020, staff and students who are in the EU will be able to access it.

Copyright Librarian: City’s Copyright Librarian is available to respond to copyright enquiries. He can be contacted on digilib@city.ac.uk, and aims to respond to enquiries within two working days.

Open Access journals and books:

Articles that have been published in Open Access with a Creative Commons licence may be freely shared. Open Access content may be found in the following ways:

  • BASE and CORE allow many Open Access sources around the world to be searched
  • Sherpa Search is a trial search service to search across UK Open Access institutional repositories
  • Google Scholar may indicate if an article is available to view.

For journal articles that you have written, publishers will often allow authors to use these within your institution for educational purposes. Check the publishing agreement if you are not sure.

There is a Directory of Open Access books.

Open Educational Resources: These are resources that can be freely used, and sometimes modified, by educators. They are made available under Creative Commons licences (see the Copyright Guide for further information).

Two sources of such resources are: Where to find OERs from the University of Edinburgh, and OER Commons.

Assessing risk: If you are not sure whether you may infringe copyright law, ask yourself the following questions:

    1. Is it likely that what you are doing infringes copyright?
    2. Is it likely that the copyright holder will discover your activity?
    3. Is it likely that the copyright holder will object to your activity?
    4. What is the impact (both financial and reputational) if the copyright holder was to take action against you or the University?

If the answer to the first three questions is ‘yes’, then it may be advisable to request permission from the publisher. You can also contact the Copyright Librarian (digilib@city.ac.uk) for guidance.

Further information:

The book ‘Copyright & E-learning: A guide for practitioners’ contains much helpful guidance. It is available as an e-book via Library Services.

A blog post on the UK Copyright Literacy website provides some more detail and there is a lot of other useful copyright information available too.

A lot of the above information applies at any time, not just during the current crisis.

Extended loans and longer chats

Library Services has auto-renewed the majority of items which were due back from March 9th onwards until June, and any new items borrowed will also be extended longer than normal. There are a few instances where this hasn’t been possible – if this is the case with any of your items please get in touch and we will manually update your records for you.

Person carrying books with multi-coloured spines.

 

We are also increasing our Online Chat service hours, so you can now speak to a member of Library staff online from 9am to 5pm during weekdays.

These are just some of the steps we are taking to eliminate as much stress and disruption as possible during what is a challenging and overwhelming time.

We are doing everything we can to make sure resources and support remains available to you when you need it, including extending our online services and adding to our collections.

If you have any questions, comments or concerns please do contact us.

Accessing law e-books

Library Services provides all current City students access to a huge range of e-books, on Westlaw, Lexis and other platforms.

What subjects are covered?

These titles cover a lot of different law topics: Company & Commercial, Crime, Employment, EU and International Law, Family, Land and Property, Litigation, Tort Law and many more.

We give you online access to texts such as “The White Book” and “Blackstones on Criminal Practice”, so you can always consult them even when all the library copies are being used.

Shipping books such as Snell’s Equity, Kennedy Rose on the Law of Salvage, and Scrutton on Charter parties are also available online, so you don’t have to wait to get your hands on them!

We also subscribe to many of the Butterworths’ handbooks and practitioner textbooks such as Banks on Sentence or McDonald on Immigration. This means you don’t have to come to the library to access them, they are all available from your computer and you can access it from anywhere.

If you’re already writing your dissertation, you’ll be happy to know that the library is in a great position to support you as a lot of content is accessible remotely.

How do I get a list of all the available books?

Does this sound interesting but you’re unsure which books are in the collection? Come to the Library Help Desk and we’ll show you how to view the full list on Westlaw and LexisLibrary, or send us an email to lawlibrary@city.ac.uk if you cannot find what you’re looking for. We’ve also provided some brief instructions below.

Westlaw – start by searching “Westlaw” in our catalogue (libraryservices.city.ac.uk) and log in using your City username and password.

Select the drop-down menu next to the ‘Westlaw’ logo and select “Books”: you can see all the titles included in our subscription. If you wish, you can also filter the titles by subject area, from the section headed ‘filters’ on the left-hand side.

The Westlaw interface showing the Switch Product menu button where you can choose Westlaw UK, Books or Practical Law.

LexisLibrary – search “LexisLibrary” on our catalogue and log in. On the right-hand side of the screen, there is a section headed “My Bookshelf”. Scroll down and select the “View More” link to see all the titles you can read online.

The LexisLibrary interface showing The My Bookshelf section. Listed underneath are titles such as All England Law Reports and Atkin’s Court Forms which can be browsed or searched.

When you open a book on Lexis, we recommend you open the “Table of Contents” on the left-hand side, as this will make it easier for you to browse the book. Do let us know if you have any issues reading a resource.

The table of contents opened within Blackstone’s Criminal Practice. Each part and section within the Table of Contents is expandable.

You can also use the ‘Search’ bar in both databases.

Need further help?

Please contact us at LawLibrary@city.ac.uk or come to the Help Desk if you cannot find a book or need further help!

Not a law student?

We have thousands of e-book titles covering the full range of subjects taught at City

Hold Fast, Sit Sure: City and the Saddlers

One of City’s longest-standing partnerships has been with The Worshipful Company of Saddlers. The livery company has been providing financial support to City from its inception as the Northampton Institute in the 1890s. As the below letter from 1891 shows, they were particularly quick off the mark – the first cheque arrived before the clerk had a bank account in which to deposit it!

A letter from John J Lambert, clerk of the Governing Body of the Northampton Institute, to Charles Dorman, Chair of the Governing Body. Source: Letter book from the archives. The letter reads: "Northampton Institute, 13th February, Re: Henry Kitchin's Charity. Dear Sir, I have received this moring from the Clerk to the Saddlers Company, Trustees of Henry Kitchin's Charity a cheque for £111-5-6 said to be payment of the amount due to the Governing Body from 9th May to 31st Dec. 1891 under the City Polytechnic Scheme and the Scheme for Kitchin's Charity. By this last named Scheme the Governing Body are entitled to 78/101 parts of the residue of the income of the Charity. The amount £111-5-6 will require verifying before a formal receipt is given. The important point is that for the present there is no Banking Account. I am, Sir, Yours faithfully, John J. Lambert"
A letter from John J Lambert, clerk of the Governing Body of the Northampton Institute, to Charles Dorman, Chair of the Governing Body. Source: Letter book from the archives. The letter reads: “Northampton Institute, 13th February, Re: Henry Kitchin’s Charity. Dear Sir, I have received this moring from the Clerk to the Saddlers Company, Trustees of Henry Kitchin’s Charity a cheque for £111-5-6 said to be payment of the amount due to the Governing Body from 9th May to 31st Dec. 1891 under the City Polytechnic Scheme and the Scheme for Kitchin’s Charity. By this last named Scheme the Governing Body are entitled to 78/101 parts of the residue of the income of the Charity. The amount £111-5-6 will require verifying before a formal receipt is given. The important point is that for the present there is no Banking Account. I am, Sir, Yours faithfully, John J. Lambert”

The source of these funds is the charity of Robert Kitchin, a warden of the Company in the 16th century. Upon his death in 1594, Kitchin left a perpetual income from property to be administered by the Company, stating that “every Sunday in the year, before noon, forever,” twelve poor parishioners of St Ethelbridge should be given twelve pence each, and that fifteen shillings and fourpence should be given “every year, yearly, forever” to fund ongoing maintenance of the parish church, St Ethelburga-the-Virgin within Bishopsgate. Though a modest building, the church has a storied history, and some of the 15th-century fabric remains to this day.

The church of St Ethelburga-the-Virgin within Bishopsgate. Source: Oxyman, reused under a CC BY-SA 2.0 license; available at https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/571163
The church of St Ethelburga-the-Virgin within Bishopsgate. Source: Oxyman, reused under a CC BY-SA 2.0 license

Dwindling residential numbers in the three-acre parish meant that, by the 19th century, fulfilling Kitchin’s original directions was no longer tenable. In 1891, the Charity Commission agreed that 78/101sts of the proceeds of the fund should be given to the Northampton Institute, which had a mission to improve the lives of “young men and women belonging to the poorer classes.” The remaining 23/101sts were to be paid to St Ethelburga’s. A modified version of this scheme persists to this day.

In return for their support, and as a mark of the close ties between the two organisations, the Saddlers were granted a seat on the Governing Body of the Institute. The first person appointed to this seat was Lt. Gen. John Wimburn Laurie, Master of the Company. Laurie’s 30-year military career saw him serve in conflicts from the Crimean War (1853-56) to the Serbo-Bulgarian War (1885). After his time in service, he was returned as a conservative MP for the Welsh seat of Pembroke and Haverfordwest in the 1895 and 1900 general elections, and appointed a Companion of the Order of the Bath, making him a prominent figure in Victorian society.

Lt Gen John Wimburn Laurie (seated) with his three sons. Source: Wikimedia (https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:GeneralLaurieandhisThreeSons1901.jpg); public domain
Lt Gen John Wimburn Laurie (seated) with his three sons. Source: Wikimedia; public domain

Since these early days, the Company has continued to make contributions to City via Kitchin’s charity. One of the most prominent was the Saddlers’ Sports Centre, for which the Saddlers gifted £150,000 in 1971 (equivalent to over £2,000,000 today). The state-of-the-art Centre had a flexible layout, with a 900m² main hall that facilitated sports from badminton to archery. The Centre also featured a sauna and outdoor climbing wall, and was the first in Britain to use Uni-Turf flooring, which supported the use of needle-spike shoes for athletics events.

The editor of Quest, City’s magazine, wrote that “in no way more appropriately could [the Company] have helped future generations of students.” This prediction has so far been borne out; the Centre is still in use as the Saddlers Sports Hall.

A view of the main hall in the new Saddlers' Sports Centre, 1976. Source: Quest no. 31 (1976)
A view of the main hall in the new Saddlers’ Sports Centre, 1976. Source: Quest no. 31 (1976)

The Saddlers have also made generous contributions to the Student Union, granting £4,300 towards the redevelopment of the union bar (equivalent to roughly £25,000 today). In honour of this, the Union named the bar after the Company. The Saddlers’ Bar was opened in 1978, with the first pint being pulled by Alan Loader Maffey, 2nd Baron Rugby, who was Master of the Saddlers Company at the time.

Alan Loader Maffey, 2nd Baron Rugby, Master of the Saddlers Company, pulling the first pint in the new Saddlers' Bar, 1978. The pump handles feature horse's heads, in honour of the Saddlers. Source: City News (30 Oct 1978)
Alan Loader Maffey, 2nd Baron Rugby, Master of the Saddlers Company, pulling the first pint in the new Saddlers’ Bar, 1978. The pump handles feature horse’s heads, in honour of the Saddlers. Source: City News (30 Oct 1978)

With the previous Union bar at City being a place “where drinking was more a form of endurance than a pleasurable experience,” the opening of the Saddlers’ Bar was welcomed by many students at City. The Saddlers’ was the ‘prestige bar’ at City (there was also a ‘functions bar,’ also opened in 1978, complete with “full disco facilities”).

An artist's impression of the proposed Saddlers' Bar from 1978. Source: City News (12 Jun 1978)
An artist’s impression of the proposed Saddlers’ Bar from 1978. Source: City News (12 Jun 1978)

The Saddlers’ was styled after a traditional Victorian pub, with buttoned-tufted leather booths, dark wooden furniture, and “real glasses” instead of plastic ones. Despite several renamings and relocations over the years, the bar has been in continuous operation ever since, and is currently known as City Bar.

A group of five students enjoy the new Saddlers' Bar in 1978. Source: City News (30 Oct 1978)
A group of five students enjoy the new Saddlers’ Bar in 1978. Source: City News (30 Oct 1978)

More recent contributions have included funding for the first computer link between the main university computer facilities and City’s two halls of residence, which was completed in 1987, and funding for an alumni database in 1991.

City is hugely grateful for our close relationship with our friends at the Worshipful Company of Saddlers over the last 130 years. Long may it continue.

New books – March 2020

We are adding new books to our collections every month. Use the carousel below to browse a diverse selection of the new titles added between January and March 2020 . Click on any cover to see where the book is located or to place a request.

Want to recommend a book? Tell us what’s missing from our collections via our More Books, Read for Research or Liberating City schemes.