New books – March 2020

We are adding new books to our collections every month. Use the carousel below to browse a diverse selection of the new titles added between January and March 2020 . Click on any cover to see where the book is located or to place a request.

Want to recommend a book? Tell us what’s missing from our collections via our More Books, Read for Research or Liberating City schemes. 

 

Liberating CityLibrary

This month we’re excited to launch our new initiative ‘Liberating CityLibrary’ where we’re asking students and staff to recommend books to help us improve the diversity of our collections.

We want to increase the range of books in the library written by people from a BAME (Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic) background, books by and about LGBTQI+ people and titles which recognise overlapping identities and experiences such as gender, class, sexuality and disability.

Liberating CityLibrary will work in a similar way to the already established book suggestion schemes ‘More Books‘ and ‘Read for Research’. To get involved all you need to do is complete our online form and if the requested book costs less than £60 and there are no copies in stock, your order will be placed within five working days.

We look forward to receiving your suggestions and will be sharing monthly highlights via CityLibrary News and social media.

If you have any questions about Liberating CityLibrary please email library@city.ac.uk.

Sage Research Methods Video

Are you starting a research project? Do you need to refresh your knowledge of research methods?

SAGE Research Methods Video is a streaming video collection created to support every stage of the research process. Sage Research Methods Video is suitable for both undergraduate students undertaking research for the first time and more experienced researchers.  Key areas such as writing a research proposal, planning and designing a research project and securing ethical approval are all covered.

 

A few examples of the different types of videos on offer:

The videos are fully integrated with our existing SAGE Research Methods subscription which includes books, handbooks and encyclopaedias and the well-known little green books (quantitative methods series) and little blue books (qualitative methods series).

Accessing Sage Research Methods Video

You can access Sage Research Methods Video via CityLibrary Search or Databases A-Z List.

If you have any questions about this resource you can contact library@city.ac.uk.

Stay up-to-date with The FT.com and The Economist

Do want to keep up with the news but don’t know where to start? Are you interested in politics, business or international relations? Then City Library can help you! You can access the best in international news, analysis and comment from our subscriptions to the Financial Times (FT) and The Economist.

The FT.com

Every student at City gets their very own FT account, which gives access to the entire site, including apps for phones and tablets, up-to-date news and information and all the FT’s articles. All you need to do is register. Don’t worry if you’re not interested in finance – the FT also includes commentary on politics, economics and the arts.

Financial Times

Registering for the FT.com:

Step 1: Go to www.ft.com and select Sign In

Step 2: Enter your City email address and select Next

Step 3: Select SSO Sign in and enter City username and password e.g. abcd123

Step 4: Complete the registration form. Make sure you use your City email address. Accept the terms and conditions and select continue.

Step 5: You will receive an email at your City account from the FT. To complete setting up your account, you need to set up a password. Follow the prompt in the email to do this.

 

The Economist

The Economist’s primary focus is world events, politics and business, but it also runs regular sections on science and technology, as well as books and the arts.  City Library’s subscription to The Economist.com includes access to the current print edition online and previous editions going back to 1997.

The Economist

Access The Economist.com via the Databases A-Z list. Once on the webpage ignore any links asking you to log in or subscribe – you have access to the full site courtesy of City Library!

If you have any questions about either the FT or The Economist you can contact library@city.ac.uk.

 

 

 

From the Archives: City and the local community

Since its inception City has been committed to improving the lives of students, businesses and the local community. When the Northampton Institute was founded in 1894 it was done so with the intention of providing education in technological and trade subjects for the local community in the Clerkenwell district and the aim of promoting the “industrial skill, general knowledge, health and well-being of young men and women belonging to the poorer classes”.

The first courses taught at the Institute covered a wide range of vocational subjects, including trades that are still associated with the local Clerkenwell area, such as horology and goldsmithing. Courses were also offered to women, including ‘Domestic Economy’ and ‘Women’s Trades’ which enabled women to learn skilled jobs such as tailor cutting and millinery.

The Institute was keen to ensure that opportunities were available to everyone and for roughly the first 50 years, courses were primarily taught to evening students, with only around 5-10% of students attending courses during the day. Fees were to be ‘what may be reasonably expected to be paid by persons belonging to the poorer classes between the ages of 16 and 25, but admission thereto shall not be limited to persons between those ages” demonstrating the commitment the Institute had to widening educational opportunities as much as it could.

In the early days of the Institute, it was important, as it is now, to encourage the development of the whole person. This holistic approach meant that all members were to have access to recreational opportunities as well as educational ones. This ethos was influenced by the ‘People’s Palace’ in Mile End, which sought to ‘raise the moral tone and life style of poor workers of East London’. This motivation is explored in the City125 Exhibition.

Entertainments and recreations were provided by the Institute for students and members of the local community, who could join the Institute for a fee. Some activities, such as concerts, were open to the wider public.

The swimming baths are also worth a mention here. Described in a 1913 pamphlet as being ‘large and commodious’, it was the first swimming pool in Islington when it opened in. In 1908, it was used as a training pool for the London Olympics. The Great Hall was the venue for Boxing in the same games.

 

City may now be an institution with a global outlook, but it has never forgotten its original ethos to expand and widen educational opportunities for Londoners.  The Department of Music continues to offer concerts, and the University still offers public lectures. In addition to this, members of City can still get involved in volunteering opportunities in the local community.

In July the second part of the exhibition ‘The Story of City: life, learning and legacy’ will be unveiled to the public. The exhibition focuses on student life at City and the role the Institute played in community life.

The exhibition is located at the foot of the Grand Staircase, on the ground floor of the Pavilion, University Building. Step-free access is available from the main entrance, on Northampton Square. Admission is free and you can visit whenever the University reception is open.

You can also view photographs and information from the exhibition on the City125 microsite. If you have any questions about the exhibition, you can contact the CityLibrary Archives team.

 

Changes to Literature Online

Literature Online (LION) has moved to the Proquest platform and is now cross-searchable with ProQuest journals, newspapers, and other relevant content.  The new Literature Online site will be available in parallel with the legacy Literature Online site until August 1, 2019. The new site will be accessible via A-Z Database List and Subject Guides but records in CityLibrary Search will continue to link to the legacy platform until July 2019.

Our other Proquest collections include The Guardian and Observer Archive, The New York Times Archive, Vogue (US) Archive, British Periodicals I and II, Music Periodicals Database and The Annual Register of World Events. To cross-search LION with these databases login to LION then select ‘Change Databases’  and choose the databases you would like to search.

LION Homepage

If you have questions about this or any of our other resources please email alexandra.asman.1@city.ac.uk

 

 

New Books – February 2019

We are regularly addding new books to our collection. Use the carousel below to browse a diverse selection of the new titles added over the last few months. Click on any cover to see where the book is located or to place a request.

Want to recommend a book? Tell us what’s missing from our collections via our More Books Scheme.

British Periodicals I and II

British Periodicals I and II offers facsimile page images and searchable full text for periodicals published from the seventeenth century through to the twentieth century. Topics covered include literature, music, philosophy, history, science, the fine arts, and the social sciences. You can browse the full list of over 300 periodicals here. You can also create an account to save searches and documents. 

 

Using the Advanced Search and you can filter results by article type, document feature or place of publication. Once you find an article you need you can download it as a PDF or email/print it.

A SUFFRAGETTE IN THE MAKING Williams, Ailsie Hamilton The Idler ; an illustrated monthly magazine; Jan 1909; 34, 76; British Periodicals

How do I access British Periodicals?

Access British Periodicals I and II via the Databases A-Z list or CityLibrary Search.

You can cross-search British Periodicals I and II content with our other Proquest subscriptions, these include The Guardian and Observer Archive, The New York Times Archive and The British Library Newspapers.

If you have any questions or feedback regarding British Peroidicals I and II please contact alexandra.asman.1@city.ac.uk 

Book History Online

Book History Online (BHO) is an international bibliography in the field of book and library history. Included are references to monographs, articles and reviews dealing with the history of the printed book.  

It contains bibliographic information on topics such as papermaking, bookbinding, book illustration, type design, typefounding, bibliophily, book collecting, libraries and individuals. It is the online continuation of the Annual Bibliography of the History of the Printed Book and Libraries (ABHB).

Book History Screenshot

 

Book History Online will be of particular interest to those studying or researching Publishing, Library and Information Science and English.

You can access Book History Online  via City Library Search or the A-Z Database List.

Resource of the month: British Library Newspapers

The British Library Newspapers collection contains full runs newspapers specially BL Newspaper searchselected by the British Library to best represent nineteenth century Britain.

The collection includes national and regional newspapers with special attention paid to include newspapers that helped lead particular political or social movements such as Reform, Chartism, and Home Rule. The penny papers aimed at the working and clerical classes are also present in the collection.

Newspaper images can be magnified for easier reading or reduced for on screen navigation. You can save and print article images, create persistent links and email them to others.

What can I search for?

  • News Articles – read about national events, as well as issues of local and regional importance. 

    Essex Newspaper
    “Another Horrible Murder in Whitechapel.” Essex Newsman, Tuesday, July 23, 1889, Issue 5150, p.3
  • Family Notices – search for birth, marriage and death notices.
  • Letters – read letters to the editor written by the newspaper’s readers, including illuminating contemporary debates, aspirations and anxieties.
  • Obituaries – view a wealth of contemporary information on the lives of notable individuals.
  • Advertisements – these include classifieds, shipping notices and appointments.
  • Illustrations – see photographs, engravings, graphics, maps and editorial cartoons.

How do I access British Library Newspapers?

Access British Library Newspapers via the Databases A-Z list or the Newspapers Library Guide

You can also access British Library Newspaper content via Gale Primary Sources. Gale Primary Sources allows you to cross-search many of the digitised newspaper collections City subscribes to, including The Times, Sunday Times and the Daily Mail.

Newspaper Clipping
“Grand Opening of the Great Exhibition.” Chelmsford Chronicle, 2 May 1851, p. 4.

If you have any questions about British Library Newspapers please contact Alex Asman (Alexandra.Asman.1@city.ac.uk)