Brush up on your academic skills this autumn

Do you ever feel overwhelmed when you’re assigned to write an essay? Do you struggle to manage your time effectively? Do you want to get better at sitting exams?

Our colleagues in the Academic Skills Team are hosting a series of Study Skills webinars that address these common challenges and more.

These webinars are designed to support you when learning remotely and will begin on the 16th of October, running through to 8th of December. They include: Continue reading Brush up on your academic skills this autumn

COVID-19 in America: Response, Issues, and Law

COVID-19 in America: Response, Issues, and Law is a brand new database available via HeinOnline focusing on issues related to the ongoing global pandemic from a U.S. perspective. Continue reading COVID-19 in America: Response, Issues, and Law

Services and Resources Status Updates

Have you ever wondered why a library resource is not working or wanted to check if there is any upcoming system maintenance? You can now quickly do so, by checking our Current status of library services and resources page!

We knew that having a centralised place to check would make your life easier, so we worked hard to produce a tool that would clearly show you the status of Library Services’ core systems and services. So now, in one place, we are able to highlight to you known issues and periods of service disruption, and provide you with information on alternatives where necessary.

On that page you will be able to check the status of our online resources, services and spaces. Specific major issues are highlighted at the top, but you can click on each category to get more details on what is happening (an alert shows next to a category when there is an issue related to it), and learn about other potential issues:

  • In Online resources are listed current issues with library resources and news items about upcoming maintenance, as well as workarounds for known issues. If you have found an issue with a resource, this page may tell you why. If not, you can report the issue to e-access@city.ac.uk
  • By checking the status of our Services, you will know if any of them is disrupted – did you know that all but one are available at the moment?
  • Currently all our physical Spaces are closed, of course, but this will be a useful page to remember checking when we reopen.  

Give it a quick try at https://libanswers.city.ac.uk/systems –  see what’s happening and what will be happening soon!

LibKey Nomad, a useful tool for research

Searching for articles? LibKey Nomad is what you need!

LibKey Nomad is the Chrome browser extension from Browzine that will help you find copies of either Open Access articles or articles that City subscribes to.

 

You can download the LibKey Nomad extension from the Chrome Store.

You just need to select your institution (City, University of London) then it will pop up with a link in the bottom left corner of your browser when it finds a copy of an article.

 

To get further details about how to use LibKey, take a look at this online guide, and get set for article adventures!

Copyright and Online Teaching

The following information about copyright has been compiled by Library Services to assist academic staff in preparing online material for students.

Copyright Guide: City has a Copyright Guide. There is a section about Copyright and Lecturing; a lot of the information there is also applicable to preparing resources for online teaching.

Digital course readings service: Scans of extracts from certain books and journals can be made available to students via links in Reading Lists Online, using the digital course readings service. Currently the library may be able to help academics make available larger extracts from books and journals than is normally the case, although scans will need to be provided from academics’ copies (as librarians do not have access to the books in the library at the moment). Academics should contact their subject librarian to discuss this. The Digitisation Team can also be contacted about this (digilib@city.ac.uk). More information about this service can be found at this webpage: https://libraryservices.city.ac.uk/resources/digital-course-reading.

Legal exceptions: The law permits staff and students to copy material from published works for research and private study, quotation, and educational purposes, without asking permission from publishers. You may only copy as much as is required, and in total must not copy more than 10% from any published resource.

Assistance with accessing resources: If staff and students are unable to access anything they need from the Library, they should contact us via our online chat service, which is staffed Monday-Friday, 9am – 5pm, or send us an email (library@city.ac.uk) or submit their enquiry through the Ask Us service at any time. Library staff will see if they can find a solution.

Broadcast material: City subscribes to a resource called Box of Broadcasts which has an archive of over two million TV and radio broadcasts that can be used for educational purposes. You can put links to the broadcasts in Moodle, Reading Lists Online, emails, etc. Box of Broadcasts is not normally available outside of the UK; however until the end of July 2020, staff and students who are in the EU will be able to access it.

Copyright Librarian: City’s Copyright Librarian is available to respond to copyright enquiries. He can be contacted on digilib@city.ac.uk, and aims to respond to enquiries within two working days.

Open Access journals and books:

Articles that have been published in Open Access with a Creative Commons licence may be freely shared. Open Access content may be found in the following ways:

  • BASE and CORE allow many Open Access sources around the world to be searched
  • Sherpa Search is a trial search service to search across UK Open Access institutional repositories
  • Google Scholar may indicate if an article is available to view.

For journal articles that you have written, publishers will often allow authors to use these within your institution for educational purposes. Check the publishing agreement if you are not sure.

There is a Directory of Open Access books.

Open Educational Resources: These are resources that can be freely used, and sometimes modified, by educators. They are made available under Creative Commons licences (see the Copyright Guide for further information).

Two sources of such resources are: Where to find OERs from the University of Edinburgh, and OER Commons.

Assessing risk: If you are not sure whether you may infringe copyright law, ask yourself the following questions:

    1. Is it likely that what you are doing infringes copyright?
    2. Is it likely that the copyright holder will discover your activity?
    3. Is it likely that the copyright holder will object to your activity?
    4. What is the impact (both financial and reputational) if the copyright holder was to take action against you or the University?

If the answer to the first three questions is ‘yes’, then it may be advisable to request permission from the publisher. You can also contact the Copyright Librarian (digilib@city.ac.uk) for guidance.

Further information:

The book ‘Copyright & E-learning: A guide for practitioners’ contains much helpful guidance. It is available as an e-book via Library Services.

A blog post on the UK Copyright Literacy website provides some more detail and there is a lot of other useful copyright information available too.

A lot of the above information applies at any time, not just during the current crisis.

Accessing law e-books

Library Services provides all current City students access to a huge range of e-books, on Westlaw, Lexis and other platforms.

What subjects are covered?

These titles cover a lot of different law topics: Company & Commercial, Crime, Employment, EU and International Law, Family, Land and Property, Litigation, Tort Law and many more.

We give you online access to texts such as “The White Book” and “Blackstones on Criminal Practice”, so you can always consult them even when all the library copies are being used.

Shipping books such as Snell’s Equity, Kennedy Rose on the Law of Salvage, and Scrutton on Charter parties are also available online, so you don’t have to wait to get your hands on them!

We also subscribe to many of the Butterworths’ handbooks and practitioner textbooks such as Banks on Sentence or McDonald on Immigration. This means you don’t have to come to the library to access them, they are all available from your computer and you can access it from anywhere.

If you’re already writing your dissertation, you’ll be happy to know that the library is in a great position to support you as a lot of content is accessible remotely.

How do I get a list of all the available books?

Does this sound interesting but you’re unsure which books are in the collection? Come to the Library Help Desk and we’ll show you how to view the full list on Westlaw and LexisLibrary, or send us an email to lawlibrary@city.ac.uk if you cannot find what you’re looking for. We’ve also provided some brief instructions below.

Westlaw – start by searching “Westlaw” in our catalogue (libraryservices.city.ac.uk) and log in using your City username and password.

Select the drop-down menu next to the ‘Westlaw’ logo and select “Books”: you can see all the titles included in our subscription. If you wish, you can also filter the titles by subject area, from the section headed ‘filters’ on the left-hand side.

The Westlaw interface showing the Switch Product menu button where you can choose Westlaw UK, Books or Practical Law.

LexisLibrary – search “LexisLibrary” on our catalogue and log in. On the right-hand side of the screen, there is a section headed “My Bookshelf”. Scroll down and select the “View More” link to see all the titles you can read online.

The LexisLibrary interface showing The My Bookshelf section. Listed underneath are titles such as All England Law Reports and Atkin’s Court Forms which can be browsed or searched.

When you open a book on Lexis, we recommend you open the “Table of Contents” on the left-hand side, as this will make it easier for you to browse the book. Do let us know if you have any issues reading a resource.

The table of contents opened within Blackstone’s Criminal Practice. Each part and section within the Table of Contents is expandable.

You can also use the ‘Search’ bar in both databases.

Need further help?

Please contact us at LawLibrary@city.ac.uk or come to the Help Desk if you cannot find a book or need further help!

Not a law student?

We have thousands of e-book titles covering the full range of subjects taught at City

New books – March 2020

We are adding new books to our collections every month. Use the carousel below to browse a diverse selection of the new titles added between January and March 2020 . Click on any cover to see where the book is located or to place a request.

Want to recommend a book? Tell us what’s missing from our collections via our More Books, Read for Research or Liberating City schemes. 

 

Liberating CityLibrary

This month we’re excited to launch our new initiative ‘Liberating CityLibrary’ where we’re asking students and staff to recommend books to help us improve the diversity of our collections.

We want to increase the range of books in the library written by people from a BAME (Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic) background, books by and about LGBTQI+ people and titles which recognise overlapping identities and experiences such as gender, class, sexuality and disability.

Liberating CityLibrary will work in a similar way to the already established book suggestion schemes ‘More Books‘ and ‘Read for Research’. To get involved all you need to do is complete our online form and if the requested book costs less than £60 and there are no copies in stock, your order will be placed within five working days.

We look forward to receiving your suggestions and will be sharing monthly highlights via CityLibrary News and social media.

If you have any questions about Liberating CityLibrary please email library@city.ac.uk.

CityLibrary gains Customer Service Excellence Standard

City’s Library Services Team has been awarded the Customer Service Excellence (CSE) Standard.  The standard assesses a huge number of elements and criteria, including feedback from library users, to determine the highest quality service.

This is something we could not have achieved if it was not for the help of our wonderful customers, both students and staff, who assisted in talking with the CSE assessors and who help us run a successful service in different ways.

Social Media

Our assessors picked up on several factors relating to our relationship with our students. Our social media game was praised as being beyond the standard and, without your interaction with our tweets and posts on CityLibrary News, Instagram, Twitter and Facebook, these efforts would be wasted – so thank you so much for interacting with us online as well as in person.

Continous Improvement

We were also commended on our commitment to continuous improvement where, really, it is you who drive this, you who make us a success. Without your engagement with our Feedback pop-ups, for example, we would not know how we do better – because it is what You Say that We Do. We are currently looking at the feedback we received last month but you can let us know at any time what we are doing well and what are not doing well at our Help Desks where you can talk to our staff or fill out a form.

So thank you for making us a Customer Service Excellence success!

Extended loan periods

To help you prepare for your exams, Library Services is giving you extended loan periods over the Christmas and New Year break.

 

Seven day loans

If you borrow or renew a seven day loan on Friday 6th December you won’t have to bring it back until Friday the 3rd of January.

24 hour loans

Pop in on Friday 13th December or anytime up to closing time on Monday the 23rd of December, and you will be able to keep 24 hour loans until 10am on Friday 3rd January.

You can renew seven day loans and long loans online from your Library account.

If you would like to return books, and the library happens to be closed, you can put book returns into the library book return drop. They can be found in the following locations:

  • At Northampton Square, in the University Building Walkway at bottom of the stairs up to the library
  • At Cass just outside the Learning Resource Centre
  • In the College Building, just outside the cafe near the St John’s Street entrance 
  • At Gray’s Inn Place, just outside the entrance to the Library.

Don’t forget you can stay up to date with our opening times over the Christmas and New Year period on the Library Services website and see updates on the Library social media pages on TwitterFacebook and Instagram.