Take a closer look at e-books

You’ve probably noticed that many of the items on your reading lists come as e-books. E-books are great in several ways:

    • They’re available 24/7
    • They can be accessed on and off campus
    • They’re often great for readers using assistive software
    • You won’t ever have to worry about forgetting to renew them on time
    • You can search within the text of an e-book to find the thing you want really quickly.

You’ve probably also noticed that different e-books look and function differently.

That’s because we purchase titles from different publishers and providers and so the rules about access and use can vary.

To help answer questions you might have about using e-books, we have created an online guide which you can access via the Library website. As well as some general information about using e-books, the guide has detailed sections on each of our main suppliers, offering tips on the different features available, troubleshooting advice, plus links to more information if you need it.

All of our e-books can be accessed via CityLibrary Search – just click on the ‘Full Text Online’ link when it appears in the search results.

Screenshot of CityLibrary search results screen showing titles with an e-book available.
Example search for a title with an e-book available.

We have thousands of titles available online and we’re acquiring new ones all the time (for example, the clickable images scrolling above) so whatever your research or personal interests, there should always be something for you, available when you need it.

CityLibrary makes History

On Tuesday, November 27th, CityLibrary will take part in History Day for the first time.

History Day is an annual event at Senate House bringing together libraries, archives and associated organisations to create a programme of drop-in talks and a fair designed to inspire and support researchers.

Poster featuring a woman reading and writing, advertising History Day 2018
History Day 2018

CityLibrary staff will have a stall in the main History Fair displaying items from the City, University of London Archive and Special Collections. The theme of this year’s event is ‘Women in History’ and so our display will focus on the significant impact and achievement of women at City, as well as showcasing some other notable items from our collections.

Since our founding as the Northampton Institute in 1894, City has had a strong association with STEM subjects and our History Day stall will highlight the contributions of alumni such as Shirley Wallis (the first woman to be awarded a Diploma in Technology) and Marjorie Bell (the first female student on the Northampton Institute’s Electronic Engineering course). We’ll also emphasise the crucial role women workers played during World War I and their connection to the Institute. More information on some of City’s Extraordinary Women can be found on the City website.

Notable women feature prominently in The Athenaeum, the forerunner of The New Statesman and we are the proud custodians of a special ‘Editor’s copy’ which features crucial clues as to who wrote many of the anonymous articles published between 1828-1921. We’ve selected several contributions from the likes of Millicent Fawcett and Elizabeth Barrett Browning to feature, plus the early reviews of several novels by the Brontë sisters writing under their pseudonyms: these reviews were featured (uncredited) in a recent BBC documentary series on the family (which is available to watch via BoB).

Staff will also present a range of other fascinating items and ephemera from our Rare Books collections, plus we’ll have some exciting freebies to giveaway too.

Image of postcards and a bookmark including images from the Archive of the College Building and some taken from the Walter Fincham optics collection
Archive freebies featuring images from the Archive and the Walter Fincham optics collection.

 

History Day is free to attend although the organisers recommend registering in advance. We look forwards to seeing you there and participating in what should be an interesting and engaging event.

 

Resource of the month: British Library Newspapers

The British Library Newspapers collection contains full runs newspapers specially BL Newspaper searchselected by the British Library to best represent nineteenth century Britain.

The collection includes national and regional newspapers with special attention paid to include newspapers that helped lead particular political or social movements such as Reform, Chartism, and Home Rule. The penny papers aimed at the working and clerical classes are also present in the collection.

Newspaper images can be magnified for easier reading or reduced for on screen navigation. You can save and print article images, create persistent links and email them to others.

What can I search for?

  • News Articles – read about national events, as well as issues of local and regional importance. 

    Essex Newspaper
    “Another Horrible Murder in Whitechapel.” Essex Newsman, Tuesday, July 23, 1889, Issue 5150, p.3
  • Family Notices – search for birth, marriage and death notices.
  • Letters – read letters to the editor written by the newspaper’s readers, including illuminating contemporary debates, aspirations and anxieties.
  • Obituaries – view a wealth of contemporary information on the lives of notable individuals.
  • Advertisements – these include classifieds, shipping notices and appointments.
  • Illustrations – see photographs, engravings, graphics, maps and editorial cartoons.

How do I access British Library Newspapers?

Access British Library Newspapers via the Databases A-Z list or the Newspapers Library Guide

You can also access British Library Newspaper content via Gale Primary Sources. Gale Primary Sources allows you to cross-search many of the digitised newspaper collections City subscribes to, including The Times, Sunday Times and the Daily Mail.

Newspaper Clipping
“Grand Opening of the Great Exhibition.” Chelmsford Chronicle, 2 May 1851, p. 4.

If you have any questions about British Library Newspapers please contact Alex Asman (Alexandra.Asman.1@city.ac.uk)

Unlocking the knowledge contained in doctoral theses

In most cases, it takes anywhere between three and five years to write a doctoral thesis and a lot of the content is original research. But until recently, once finished, bound, and the degree has been awarded, the doctoral theses would end up inaccessible to most potential readers.

Theses4

So where are all the theses?

At City, the theses would be catalogued and then taken to the library store. The theses would be locked away in this store, which is in the university’s basement, and it would be necessary for them to be requested in advance and brought up to the library by  library staff in order for them to be read. Obviously, the potential readers would have to make a trip to the library.

But then, in 2011, with the launch of City Research Online, our institutional repository, things changed. The bound theses are still stored in the basement, but electronic copies of the theses are made available through City Research Online.

Has it made any difference?

A quick scan of the available data shows that in the past 10 years, the most popular print thesis was requested 37 times. This is in stark contrast to the most popular electronic thesis, which was downloaded over 7000 times in just over 5 year period. Our theses have been downloaded by readers across the globe, and I am doubtful that a reader from Estonia or Zimbabwe would take a trip to City to access the print copy.

printthesesgraph

ethesesgraph

The figures also show that only 48% of our print theses have been requested to be read, whereas all our electronic theses have been downloaded at least once. Even if we assume that those downloaded once only were viewed by a librarian, this figure is still below 2% of all City theses available online.

To browse theses in City Research Online, by school or by year, click on the theses icon and discover the amazing knowledge they contain.

Theses button in CRO

 

Lenka Shipton

ccby

Creative Commons licenses made easy

CC licencses banner

Creative Commons licenses enable sharing of, and access to, creative works, such as images, scholarly literature or music.

Creative Commons in numbers

  • The American non-profit organisation providing Creative Commons licenses was founded in 2001
  • 1.4 billion works were available under a Creative Commons license in 2017
  • 56% of all works available under a Creative Commons license in 2014 didn’t restrict commercial use or adaptation

Where can you find works shared using a Creative Commons license?

flickr logo    Youtube logo   vikipedia logo  doaj logoplos logo

Creative Commons symbols, what they mean and what they allow or restrict

CC License infographic

 

New Library resource: London Review of Books

We’re pleased to announce that Library Services now subscribes to the online edition of the London Review of Books. 

Published twice a month, the London Review of Books describes itself as ‘Europe’s leading magazine of culture and ideas’. It features essays by academics, writers, and journalists on a variety of topics, as well as reviews, poetry, and letters.

Our subscription includes access to every piece ever published via the digital archive and to the blogpodcasts and short documentaries available on the website. 

Browse the archive by issue/category or search via keyword. Once you find the article you need you’ll see options to print, cite and email content at the top of each page. 

A selection of articles to get you started:

Acess the London Review of Books via CityLibrary Search or our Databases A-Z.

If you have any questions about the London Review of Books please contact alexandra.asman.1@city.ac.uk 

Copyright training with a difference!

Copyright: the Card Game

This session provides guidance in an innovative, interactive and fun way, to becoming more confident about copyright, and copying and re-using resources in the context of teaching. It is a team game which has been widely played at universities all over the world (most recently, to my knowledge, in Uruguay), and it has been known to get very competitive!

The game will cover what sort of material is covered by copyright law, what copyright protects and what use can be made of copyright material, copyright exceptions (what the law allows to be copied for specific purposes), and the role of licences (such as the CLA licence) in making content available to students.

It will be presented by Stephen Penton, who is responsible for copyright at City, and copyright expert and one of the developers of the game, Jane Secker.

If you would like to experience copyright in a totally new light, please come along! We need enough people for at least two teams.

  • Presented by: Stephen Penton (Copyright Librarian, Library Services), Jane Secker (Senior Lecturer, LEaD)
  • Time: 12-1.30pm Please bring your own lunch!
  • Room: AG08, College Building
  • Booking: https://libcal.city.ac.uk/event/3341247

If you are unable to come to this session, please do let Stephen Penton know (Stephen.penton@city.ac.uk) – he is the Copyright Librarian at City and will be happy to arrange further sessions and maintain a waiting list.

City’s institutional repository receives a makeover

This week, City Library is excited to unveil the new and improved City Research Online (CRO), the open access repository showcasing research by City staff and research students.

Learn more about the changes on our citylibresearchers blog.

 

City Research Online (CRO) to be closed for maintenance

City Research Online (CRO) will be unavailable between 2am and 8am on Tuesday 31st July 2018 due to scheduled system maintenance.

CRO is expected to be back online at the scheduled time, however, the period of unavailablility could potentially extend until 12pm.

For more information please contact publications@city.ac.uk.

The library apologises for any inconvenience caused.

ACT on ACCEPTANCE: make the REF 2021

What is Act on Acceptance?

From 1st April 2018, changes to UKRI’s open access policy (formerly HEFCE) require researchers to submit their work to City Research Online within 3 months of acceptance to be eligible for the next REF.

As soon as you know your research will be published in a peer-reviewed journal, or conference proceedings, Act on Acceptance and make your research open access.

What do you have to do?

  • Upload your publications to your Publications profile as soon as possible after they have been accepted for publication.
  • Make sure it’s the accepted manuscript and not the published version: the accepted version is peer-reviewed but not typeset for publication.

What happens next?

The Publications Team will check your deposits to make sure they are compliant with the HEFCE policy, and the publishers’ terms and conditions regarding copyright and embargo periods. Once these checks are complete, they will make them available in the City Research Online repository.

What if you need help?

If you need help with depositing papers, or have questions about the open access policy, you can consult the City Research Online and Publications library guides.

Alternatively, you can contact the Publications Team who will:

  • Answer enquiries by telephone and email.
  • Meet with you in one to one appointments.
  • Help you understand the HEFCE open access policy.
  • Help you upload your papers to your publications profile.