Want help with your citing and referencing?

Are you confused about Harvard citing and referencing, or do you need a refresher on the basics?

Good citing and referencing can help:

  • Structure your written work
  • Follow good academic practice
  • Give your written work credibility
  • Avoid plagiarism by crediting other people’s work.

If you want some help with your citing and referencing, then the library can help.

CityLibrary is running workshops throughout the term at both Northampton Square and Cass Business School on the basics of Harvard citing and referencing. These sessions will help you learn how to include citations in your work, how to reference different types of materials (e.g. book and articles), and how to create a reference list at the end of your written work.

Workshops at Northampton Square Library are running on:

Workshops at Cass Business School are running on:

  • Monday 11th February, 2.10pm – 3pm Book here
  • Tuesday 26th February, 2.10pm – 3pm Book here

Anyone can sign up for these sessions at either Northampton Square or Cass. If you can’t attend, there is also a guide on Harvard citing and referencing here.

5 ways to take a break: Library-style

It could be because it’s exam season. There could be a coursework deadline looming. Either way, you’ve decided to camp out in the Library: you’ve remembered your water, cold snacks, laptop, and those fluffy slippers to keep your feet comfortably cosy. You’re ready-to-go with an all-night revision-a-thon. Your referencing is going to show Harvard who’s boss. It’s on, people.

But you also know that having a break is ESSENTIAL to successful exam survival and coursework preparation. Rest is important. Burning yourself out will not help anyone.

So, with this in mind, here are 5 things you can do in the Library that will help you take your mind off things:

  1. Look out of the window. From a glorious sunrise, to a spectacular sunset, looking out of the window can be awe inspiring; and inspiration is key to good studying. On a bright sunny day gaze at beautiful blue skies and puffy clouds. On grey rainy days, watch as other people get drenched. Bliss.

    Sunset from Level 6
  2. Go for a walk. We have 5 floors, stairs, lifts, doors to open and close- plenty of promenading possibilities. Plus, you never know who you might bump into
  3. Browse. Seriously, not only does it add a whole new exciting dimension to promenading (see: 2, above) but browsing can be serendipitous for the soul. We’ve got loads of things you can browse, books (pick up a floor guide at the desk, choose a section, off you go…) journals, newspapers. And once you’ve found something which sparks your imagination, grab a comfy purple chair, sit back and expand your mind.
  4. Hang out with BoB. BoB could be your new best friend. BoB will listen to what you want and try to give you what you want, when you want it. BoB’s great like that.
  5. Talk to a librarian. Twitter, Facebook, Instagram or even the good old fashioned way, in person, at the Service Desk. Topics we’re good at include: library essentials, resources, referencing, knitting, board games, TV and cake.

And remember: you will get there in the end- just make sure you look after yourself on the way.

Library Staff Love #6: BoB

When you think of Bob, do you think of:

https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/
Bob the Builder (Bob the Builder Balloon by Brian & Jaclyn Drum)

Or:

Bob Marley
Bob Marley (via Google Image Search)

Maybe even:

By Anna_Wintour_&_Alexa_Chung.jpg: LGEPR, Cropped by Daniel Case, 2010-06-10 derivative work: Daniel Case (Anna_Wintour_&_Alexa_Chung.jpg) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
Anna Wintour’s Hair Cut (photo by Daniel Case)

???

Well, it’s time to think again people.

Because when we talk about Bob, we’re really talking about BoB:

Blackadder II
Blackadder II on Box of Broadcasts

Box of Broadcasts (or BoB) is a fantastic archive of material recorded off-air allowing you to watch programmes, schedule to record shows and compile playlists of your TV and Radio favourites. You can even create clips to be included in your presentations or teaching sessions, as well as reference clips in your assignments and literature reviews.

As an educational resource only made available to UK higher and further education institutions, BoB opens up a tremendous avenue for research, especially as its scope extends beyond the UK and into several foreign language channels.

BoB features in our collection alongside a range of other brilliant a/v resources, more details of which can found via CityLibrary Search or our marvellous Library Guides.

Alex from our Acquisitions Team is a fan of BoB and wanted to recommend it as a favourite Library resource:

“When I’ve missed something on TV, and it’s too late for iPlayer/catch up, I check to see if it’s on BoB… I was annoyed when I just missed the new series of Happy Valley recently, and then saw that it was on BoB. Great! And I could revisit the first series too if I wanted…”

Obviously, Alex was using BoB as part of his commitment to continual professional development, keeping up to date with key Library resources.

Totes.

Resource of the month: Cite Them Right Online.

What is it?download

Your go-to resource for proper citing and referencing. 

It covers how to cite and reference resources in your work using Harvard, the standard style for City, as well as APA, MLA, MHRA, OSCOLA and Vancouver referencing styles.Content includes step-by-step instructions for citing and referencing anything you use in your work including:

  • Book chapters
  • Journal articles 
  • Company reports
  • Websites 
  • Newspaper articles
  • YouTube videos
  • Legal cases
  • Government documents

Cite Them Right also has added content including videos, tips and tricks and guidelines for avoiding plagiarism.

How can I use it? Search for the type of resource you want to reference (e.g. ‘magazine article’) or browse using the categories at the top and choose your preferred style. Use the box next to the reference example to fill in your reference without having to switch between your browser and document.

Where can I find it? Search for ‘Cite Them Right’ in CityLibrary Search.