CityLibrary’s online, you’re feeling fine

We want to make sure you’re able to access and use all the online Library resources and services available to you working remotely. There are lots of ways you can get support 24 hours a day, seven days a week, including: Continue reading CityLibrary’s online, you’re feeling fine

CityLibrary online

The buildings might be closed but CityLibrary is most definitely open. Whatever help you need accessing and using Library resources and services, there are lots of ways you can get it, including:

Online Chat

We have extended our Online Chat service so you can now speak to a member of Library staff online from 9am to 5pm during weekdays. You can find the Online Chat box via the Library homepage.

Ask Us

When Online Chat isn’t available, you can still ask questions and find answers using our Ask Us service. If you can’t find an answer to your question straight away, simply submit a new question and we’ll get back to you with an answer as soon as possible.

Appointments with a Subject Librarian

Our Subject Librarians are available for appointments via Teams or telephone. Book an appointment online or contact your Subject Librarian to arrange a suitable date/time.

Research support

If you need help with your PhD research project, guidance on Open Access publishing via City Research Online or advice relating to Copyright, you can contact a member of our Research Support Team.

Library Guides

Find advice, guidance, tips and useful links via our Library Guides, including subject-specific pages for each School, and information on the types of services and resources available.

Library Guides Homepage

CityLibrary News and Social media

Keep up-to-date with all things Library related by subscribing to CityLibrary News or following us on Twitter, Instagram or Facebook.

Finally, as ever, you can email library@city.ac.uk with your questions, comments and suggestions and use our online feedback form too.

 

Keep taking care of yourselves, and each other.

Copyright and Online Teaching

The following information about copyright has been compiled by Library Services to assist academic staff in preparing online material for students.

Copyright Guide: City has a Copyright Guide. There is a section about Copyright and Lecturing; a lot of the information there is also applicable to preparing resources for online teaching.

Digital course readings service: Scans of extracts from certain books and journals can be made available to students via links in Reading Lists Online, using the digital course readings service. Currently the library may be able to help academics make available larger extracts from books and journals than is normally the case, although scans will need to be provided from academics’ copies (as librarians do not have access to the books in the library at the moment). Academics should contact their subject librarian to discuss this. The Digitisation Team can also be contacted about this (digilib@city.ac.uk). More information about this service can be found at this webpage: https://libraryservices.city.ac.uk/resources/digital-course-reading.

Legal exceptions: The law permits staff and students to copy material from published works for research and private study, quotation, and educational purposes, without asking permission from publishers. You may only copy as much as is required, and in total must not copy more than 10% from any published resource.

Assistance with accessing resources: If staff and students are unable to access anything they need from the Library, they should contact us via our online chat service, which is staffed Monday-Friday, 9am – 5pm, or send us an email (library@city.ac.uk) or submit their enquiry through the Ask Us service at any time. Library staff will see if they can find a solution.

Broadcast material: City subscribes to a resource called Box of Broadcasts which has an archive of over two million TV and radio broadcasts that can be used for educational purposes. You can put links to the broadcasts in Moodle, Reading Lists Online, emails, etc. Box of Broadcasts is not normally available outside of the UK; however until the end of July 2020, staff and students who are in the EU will be able to access it.

Copyright Librarian: City’s Copyright Librarian is available to respond to copyright enquiries. He can be contacted on digilib@city.ac.uk, and aims to respond to enquiries within two working days.

Open Access journals and books:

Articles that have been published in Open Access with a Creative Commons licence may be freely shared. Open Access content may be found in the following ways:

  • BASE and CORE allow many Open Access sources around the world to be searched
  • Sherpa Search is a trial search service to search across UK Open Access institutional repositories
  • Google Scholar may indicate if an article is available to view.

For journal articles that you have written, publishers will often allow authors to use these within your institution for educational purposes. Check the publishing agreement if you are not sure.

There is a Directory of Open Access books.

Open Educational Resources: These are resources that can be freely used, and sometimes modified, by educators. They are made available under Creative Commons licences (see the Copyright Guide for further information).

Two sources of such resources are: Where to find OERs from the University of Edinburgh, and OER Commons.

Assessing risk: If you are not sure whether you may infringe copyright law, ask yourself the following questions:

    1. Is it likely that what you are doing infringes copyright?
    2. Is it likely that the copyright holder will discover your activity?
    3. Is it likely that the copyright holder will object to your activity?
    4. What is the impact (both financial and reputational) if the copyright holder was to take action against you or the University?

If the answer to the first three questions is ‘yes’, then it may be advisable to request permission from the publisher. You can also contact the Copyright Librarian (digilib@city.ac.uk) for guidance.

Further information:

The book ‘Copyright & E-learning: A guide for practitioners’ contains much helpful guidance. It is available as an e-book via Library Services.

A blog post on the UK Copyright Literacy website provides some more detail and there is a lot of other useful copyright information available too.

A lot of the above information applies at any time, not just during the current crisis.

Developing your research skills

Library Services offers workshops, appointments and subject specific Library Guides in order to help you develop your research skills.

Whether you are a brand new student just starting out, returning to study after a gap and looking to refresh your skills, or a postgraduate aiming to publish your work for the first time, there are lots of ways in which we can provide support, guidance and advice at a time and a place when you need it.

Dedicated Subject and Research Librarians along with Copyright specialists and our Digital Repository team are available to assist on an individual basis, or by providing embedded information literacy workshops tailored to individual course content and module requirements.

We also provide a range of opportunities for you to access help including: Help Desks staffed 7 days a week, Online Chat, and our Ask Us service: and we’re proud to have recently been awarded Customer Service Excellence accreditation.

All of our online services and resources can be accessed via the Library website, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, as long as you have an internet connection and a smartphone, tablet, laptop, PC or other connected device.

And we’re always looking to improve our services and support too, so please do contact us with your feedback, comments and suggestions.

Copyright Licensing Agency Data Collection Exercise

16th September – 25th October

Between 16th September and 25th October the Copyright Licensing Agency (CLA) will be conducting a royalties data collection exercise.  The CLA will set up collection points at selected MFDs in departments across the University. Continue reading Copyright Licensing Agency Data Collection Exercise

Copyright training with a difference!

This session, on 2 November, 12-1.30pm, in AG08 (College Building) provides guidance in an innovative, interactive and fun way, to becoming more confident about copyright, and copying and re-using resources in the context of teaching. It is a team game which has been widely played at universities all over the world (including recently in Uruguay), and it has been known to get very competitive!

The game will cover what sort of material is covered by copyright law, what copyright protects and what use can be made of copyright material, copyright exceptions (what the law allows to be copied for specific purposes), and the role of licences (such as the CLA licence) in making content available to students.

It will be presented by Stephen Penton, who is responsible for copyright at City, and copyright expert and one of the developers of the game, Jane Secker.Copyright Card Game cards

 

If you would like to experience copyright in a totally new light, please come along! We need enough people for at least two teams.

  • Presented by: Stephen Penton (Copyright Librarian, Library Services), Jane Secker (Senior Lecturer, LEaD)
  • Time: 12-1.30pm, 2 November. Please bring your own lunch!
  • Room: AG08, College Building
  • Booking: https://libcal.city.ac.uk/event/3353358

If you are unable to come to this session, please do let Stephen Penton know (Stephen.penton@city.ac.uk) – he is the Copyright Librarian at City and will be happy to arrange further sessions and maintain a waiting list.

Copyright training with a difference!

Copyright: the Card Game

This session provides guidance in an innovative, interactive and fun way, to becoming more confident about copyright, and copying and re-using resources in the context of teaching. It is a team game which has been widely played at universities all over the world (most recently, to my knowledge, in Uruguay), and it has been known to get very competitive!

The game will cover what sort of material is covered by copyright law, what copyright protects and what use can be made of copyright material, copyright exceptions (what the law allows to be copied for specific purposes), and the role of licences (such as the CLA licence) in making content available to students.

It will be presented by Stephen Penton, who is responsible for copyright at City, and copyright expert and one of the developers of the game, Jane Secker.

If you would like to experience copyright in a totally new light, please come along! We need enough people for at least two teams.

  • Presented by: Stephen Penton (Copyright Librarian, Library Services), Jane Secker (Senior Lecturer, LEaD)
  • Time: 12-1.30pm Please bring your own lunch!
  • Room: AG08, College Building
  • Booking: https://libcal.city.ac.uk/event/3341247

If you are unable to come to this session, please do let Stephen Penton know (Stephen.penton@city.ac.uk) – he is the Copyright Librarian at City and will be happy to arrange further sessions and maintain a waiting list.

4 things researchers at City should know about Library Services

Are you busy writing your PhD? Finishing off a paper for publication? Or, just thinking about starting a project?

Well, the good news is Library Services can help you. And the even better news is that we can help you help yourself too. Here are 4 things you need to know:

  1. We have experts dedicated to you: Research Librarians, a Copyright Librarian, the Publications Team- we have a host of talented and dedicated staff members ready to answer your questions, support your enquiries and help solve your problems; all to make sure you know everything you need to know about all the things you need to know about
  2. Our specialist Library guide is special: so special in fact that it covers literally everything, from starting a literature search to ordering an Inter-Library Loan. And when we say everything, we mean everything: including those things you didn’t even know that you didn’t know about…
  3. You can tell us to buy things for you: Read for Research is set up so you can ask us to purchase books needed for your research. You’re just an online form away from ordering all sorts of goodies to be added to our collection- and the best bit? You get to borrow the item first, freshly processed, still glistening with newness
  4. City Research Online has gone global: our institutional repository reaches a worldwide audience, meaning your research really will have an international impact. Plus, you can keep up to date with all the latest output from schools and departments across the University via Twitter: articles, PhD theses, book chapters and more.

4 things, one outcome: your research success.