0

CAREERS: WHAT NEXT?

First, let’s shatter a few myths.

  1. YOU DO NOT HAVE TO KNOW WHAT YOU WANT TO DO BEFORE YOU VISIT THE CAREERS CENTRE. There – I’ve said it.  Part of our role is to support you in starting from scratch, deciding between several options or even just going away and reflecting on what’s best for you.
  2. We won’t laugh, gasp or throw up our hands in horror if you come up with a careers idea that seems a little off the wall, up in the air or out of left field.  Believe me, we have heard it all before and we can offer practical advice on turning a dream, however elusive, into reality. Anything is possible – although modifications may be needed along the way….
  3. No pressure. You don’t necessarily have to choose a ‘career’, let alone the ‘correct’ career.   You merely need to get the next step in place, with perhaps a Plan B hovering in case it’s needed.   A career is organic, open to modification and transformation, not something that can be selected only once and is either right or wrong.
  4. Apropos the last point, we would reckon that today’s graduates would have at least three separate careers (not just jobs) during their working lives.  That gives you plenty of leeway to explore and experiment. Given the pace of change in the labour market, you might even end up doing a job that doesn’t even exist yet.

Graduation is exciting, but for many it’s also pretty daunting. Not knowing what happens next is alarming at best, intimidating at worst. So how can we, in Careers, help you at this turning point?Once any student graduates, they can use the careers service and its facilities, for free, for up to three years. That includes attending events such as careers fairs and employer presentations as well as obtaining in depth guidance, not to mention the nuts and bolts stuff such as CV checks or advice on applications and interviews.

We are based in the Drysdale Building, Northampton Square in Room E125.  Feel free to book an appointment via Careershub to see a consultant: careershub.city.uk. If you have any difficulty accessing Careershub, you can contact us via email: careers@city.ac.uk  or on 020 7 040 8093.  Yes, we are here throughout the summer, although not at weekends or before 9am /after 5pm.

We’re friendly, we’re knowledgeable and we’re keen to help.  What’s not to like?

We look forward to seeing you and working towards your future together.

Gill Sharp, Freelance Careers Consultant

0

Unitemps of the Year Awards 2018

We would like to say a massive thank you to all those who attended our second Unitemps of the Year Awards at City on Thursday 12th April 2018. We celebrated and rewarded the hard work, dedication and outstanding contributions that temps and hiring managers have made over the past year.

Unitemps (City) are proud of all the individuals that we have placed in roles and of all the managers who go the extra mile to develop their temps.

We would like to congratulate all nominees and winners this year!

Unitemps of the Year Awards 2018 Nominees and Winners

Invigilator Award

Nominees: Bojan Nikolic; Sophen Tew; Paul Richards; Jacqueline Hind

Shortlist: Sophen Tew; Paul Richards

Winner: Sophen Tew

Hiring Manager Award

Nominees: Katharine Knight; Marius Stancu; Jason Barlow; Joe Thuraisamy; Marilyn Parris-Bell; Miles Battye; Ben Copsey; Thalia Anagnostopoulou; Russell Best; Leanne Allen

Shortlist:; Leanne Allen; Ben Copsey; Marilyn Parris-Bell

Joint Winners: Leanne Allen and Ben Copsey

External Temp Award

Nominees: Jack Fargher; Eleanor Gill; Wei Qiang Lim

Shortlist: Wei Qiang Lim; Eleanor Gill

Winner: Eleanor Gill

Student Ambassador Award

Nominees: Bhavik Patel; Anne Marie Schofield; Charlotte Erin Bird; Homaira Rahimi; Menka Shah; Thomas Robert Edward Kell; Tommaso Ciani Sciolla; Maria Chiara De Vito; Godswill Udo; Birsem Tilki; Heena Kapoor; Jasmine Sookprechar; Danisha Mudalige; Rebeca Torres; Tanzyla Khan Tareen; Dillon Thompson; Yi Jiun Tan; Olivia Mante; Syeda Sadia Khatun Choudhury; Haneefa Yousaf; Marie Wemme; Ali Ahdash; Arjun Sarai; Magdalena Farynska; Zonaah Tariq

Honourable mentions: Jasmine Sookprechar; Syeda Sadia Khatun Choudhury; Anne Marie Schofield; Rebeca Torres; Maria Chiara De Vito

Shortlist: Birsem Tilki; Charlotte Erin Bird; Tanzyla Khan Tareen

Winner: Tanzyla Khan Tareen

Unitemp of the Year Award

Nominees: Ana Lanchin; Sathya Mathivanan; Ernestina Palm; Abigail Hardiman; Thomas Alcock; Leanne Allen; Maria Parvez; Saddam Miah; Selin Keskin; Glens Andersons; Carolina Are; Marwa Sharif; Mustapha El Bouabi; Devlin Nangpal; Homaira Rahimi; Chantal Gyamfi

Shortlist: Ernestina Palm; Selin Keskin; Carolina Are

Winner: Ernestina Palm

Thank you so much for giving me the award of Unitemp of the Year 2018. I am so grateful.

I would like to thank Unitemps as my employer and giving me the opportunity to work with them. Not only were Unitemps my employer but also my sponsors; helping me to fund my studies.

I would like to thank everyone that I have ever worked with and everyone I have worked for, as you have all given me great memories and helped me to build my character.

For everyone who has worked through Unitemps, this just goes to show how much hard work is still relevant. Always just give your best and push forward. No matter what you are going through there will always be a light at the end of the tunnel. Keep pushing and your hard work will pave way for you!

– Ernestina Palm, Unitemp of the Year 2018

We look forward to next year’s celebration!

0

How to manage multiple job, placement or internship offers

As career consultants we are often offering guidance on how to stay resilient during your job search. How to handle rejection and how to keep yourself motivated during what can seem like endless months of applications, tests and interviews.

However for some students, there is another challenge, and that is how to handle multiple job offers, how to remain professional when turning down an employer and how to ensure you are not burning any bridges for the future.

Here are our top tips for students in this position.

What do you want?

First things first, you need to decide which job offer you want to accept. You need to consider all the factors that led you to apply in the first place. Think about the role, location, time, salary and where the opportunity might lead, then match these things to your personal skills, circumstances and values.

Some students may want to make a list of pros and cons others will go with their gut feeling for an organisation. This is ultimately your choice, and whilst you may want to sound out other people for their opinions, this is about where you will be working and your career!

Don’t spend too long deciding

Put yourself in the position of the recruiter and other applicants. Whilst you need to make a considered decision, it’s not a good idea to keep the employer hanging on endlessly. When you receive the call or emails offering you the position – thank the employer and let them know when you will respond, provide a set time frame, 24 -48 hours maximum. You can say you need to discuss the offer with your family or academic institution.

How to say no

Within the time frame outlined call the employer or recruiter and politely decline any offers you don’t want to accept. Be professional and honest. There is no need to give too much detail. It is good practise to also decline the offer in writing.

Write to the person who has made you the offer, and as with all communication make sure you use exemplary language and punctuation. This is a formal letter and should be written as such.

An example of suitable text might be:

Thank you for your offer, and the opportunity to work or your company. It has been a very hard decision but I have decided to accept another position as I feel it a closer fit to my skills and career aspirations. I would like to thank you once again for your time and offering me the opportunity.

Can I use multiple job offers to leverage a better deal for myself.

Whilst this may be a tactic used by experienced hires, it is not something we would advocate for undergraduates or recent graduates. You have applied for a position for which the terms and conditions were outlined; the expectation would be that you have entered into the recruitment process knowing this. The sheer competitiveness of internship and graduate roles means negotiation is usually a fruitless task.

What if I have a job offer but I’m still waiting to hear from a company that I really want to work for?

This situation is really difficult. You should follow the advice given earlier on asking the employer offering you a role for time to consider the offer. Then it is worth contacting the other company to find out where they are with their recruitment process and when you can expect to hear from them. It may be worth mentioning that you have an offer in hand and that they are your preferred employer; however this may not speed up or influence the process.

Ultimately you will have to make a decision. You can’t leave the employer who has made the offer hanging on indefinitely nor can you pressure the prospective employer to make a decision any faster than they want to

Consider what you want from the placement or role and decide whether at this stage you can risk giving up the offer in hand.

Once you have decided, let all parties know, the employer whose offer you are rejecting or accepting and if applicable, the employer whose recruitment process you would like to withdraw from.

In Conclusion.

Whilst holding multiple offers is an envious position to be in, it is important that you communicate clearly and effectively throughout the process. You may wish to apply to an employer you reject now in the future or you may cross paths professionally with any of the individuals you have met during the recruitment process. The way in which you approach this process will dictate how you might be viewed in any future professional transactions.

Here at City Careers we would be happy to help you work through this scenario should it arise, book in to see a careers consultant.

0

Unitemps of the Year Awards 2018

Unitemps will be hosting the annual ‘Unitemps of the Year Awards’ on Thursday 12th  April 2018, to thank and reward the hard work, dedication and outstanding contributions that temps and hiring managers have made over the duration of the year.

Nominations

Unitemps (City) are proud of all the individuals that we have placed in roles and of all the managers who go the extra mile to develop their temps.

Have you hired an amazing Ambassador or managed a fantastic full or part time temp?

Have you hired an outstanding Invigilator, Research Assistant or Exam Marker who has impressed you?

Are you a Student Ambassador or Temp with great tales to tell of times your peers have gone above and beyond or your hiring manager has been extremely supportive?

 

Click here to nominate!

Deadline for nominations: Tuesday 27th March 2018

 

Thank you!

The Unitemps Team

0

Guest blog – How to get hired at a startup by Sarah Bourke

Sarah Bourke is Customer Operations Manager at Thriva, the world’s first preventative healthcare service.

Startups are a great option for new grads. Large corporations can’t offer what startups can: the opportunity to make an impact on the whole business with relatively little experience. Plus, you get to wear jeans and play table tennis, so what’s not to love?

I’ve worked in startups for six years across three different industries, and I’ve got some insider tips on how to get hired at one.

Be specific

Generic CVs and cover letters just don’t cut it. While startups are often happy to hire new grads, they also want to make sure you’re really passionate about the company’s mission. Your CV and cover letter should reflect this. Ideally you’ll have some relevant background relating to the company, whether it’s a university society, volunteer experience, or even your own blog. Hiring managers at startups really want to see your passion, so don’t be afraid to sound excited in your cover letter – it’s exactly what we’re looking for. At Thriva, for example, we want to know that you’re passionate about preventative healthcare. And if your cover letter doesn’t even mention the role or company, it’ll probably go straight in the (digital) bin.

Be proactive

Even if you don’t have relevant experience or background in a company’s industry, just showing that you’ve done some research can be enough. If you’re interested in a role, invest time into learning more. Research the company’s background, competitors and recent developments in the industry. Incorporate some of these things into your cover letter, as well as why you’re interested in this company in particular, and you’ll already be halfway to an interview.

Consider another avenue

It’s hard to get your foot in the door for competitive positions at startups like Product Manager or Digital Marketing. Consider applying for positions that may require less direct experience, like an Account Manager or Customer Service Associate, to build up your experience. After proving yourself for six months or a year, you can ask to shadow someone in the position you’re really after, or just do a bit of work for the department. They’ll be more willing to look past your lack of experience if they know you’re a fast learner and willing to put in the effort.

Don’t get discouraged

It’s cliched, but true. The startup job market is competitive, and we get tons of applicants for every job. I recommend having a template of your CV and cover letter so that you can quickly tailor it to each job you’re applying for. If you’ve applied for lots of jobs and aren’t getting anywhere, try switching things up – try a different approach with your cover letter, or find a new CV template to work from. You never know what’s going to make a difference.

If you think you’d like to work in a startup, I’d recommend looking at some job ads to see what roles and companies interest you. WorkInStartups and AngelList are great places to start. There are hundreds of startups in London across tons of industries, so there’s something out there for everyone.

About Thriva
Thriva is the world’s first preventative healthcare service. We’ve taken the cornerstone of any health check – the blood test – and made it incredibly easy and convenient. From two week wait times to results in two days, and from no access to your results to owning your own health data. We work with NHS trained GPs and labs so you know you can trust the results and know what to do about them.

0

Developing your Commercial Awareness – Cass Students

Recently the Cass Placement Team and CityCareers have had feedback from several employers that students need to develop their commercial awareness. This blog aims to set out some key ways you can improve your commercial awareness to help you stand out at application and interview.

What is commercial awareness?

Commercial awareness refers to your knowledge of the industry you are hoping to join and it is a key skill employers look for in students and graduates. According to the recent Institute of Student Employers Annual Survey 79% of graduate employers look for commercial awareness but only 15% of new graduates have it!

How is it measured?

You may see interview or application questions such as:

  • What are the recent developments in our industry?
  • Who are our competitors and how do we differ?
  • Tell us a recent news story and how it might affect our business
  • What services do we provide to our clients?

How can I develop it?

What frameworks can help?

When analysing a company or industry you can use these frameworks to help structure your analysis or think of issues from different perspectives.

  • SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats) – some of the library databases such as Marketline Advantage publish SWOT analyses of big companies as well as giving their key competitors, employee information, history and major products and services
  • PESTEL (Political, Economic, Social, Technological, Environment, Legal)
  • 4 C’s (Customers, Costs, Competitors, Capabilities)
  • Porter’s 5 forces (Competitive Rivalry, Supplier Power, Buyer Power, Threat of Substitution, Threat of New Entry)

What resources can help me?

Library workshops e.g. Introduction to Bloomberg
Library Company Reports
Cass Library Guides

0

WHY YOU SHOULD HAVE A PART TIME JOB

Written By: Rabiya Khawaja

Many students experience that strain of finances and lack of time that comes with studying at university. So many have taken up part-time jobs in retail, cafés and other sectors to earn a few extra pounds, but there are many other benefits of taking up a part-time job which can be beneficial in your chosen career.

  1. CUSTOMER SERVICE:

Within one shift you can encounter so many different types of people. Some friendly and polite while others are incredibly testing, you learn to be patient and deal with anything that can be thrown your way. In some circumstances, you need to be sensitive in the manner you approach certain people who may need extra help with finding items or understanding procedures.

  1. WHAT RECRUITERS SEE:

Having part-time jobs shows future employers many positive things. Firstly, you can show you have commitment especially if you have worked for a few years. Having your job and study routine shows that you have a strong commitment to your job as well as your studies.

  1. MONEY!

This is the most obvious benefit of working, being a student is very financially staining from paying bills, rent and travelling. It is nice to have a regular pay check coming in aside from the student finance to help cover basic necessities.

  1. EXPERIENCE:

If you are lucky you can get a job to gain some experience in the field you want to go. This allows you to gain experience and make new connections. While studying you gain practical understating of the work environment and real-life training and an invaluable insight into what your future might be.

  1. BUDGETING:

The financial strain on students can be daunting, but the right attitude to budgeting can help relieve the stress. You can use money from work and student finance to manage your bills and rent as well as leave some over for a night out. Having a job allows you to spend more wisely since you have to work hard to earn it and you can always look forward to your next pay check.

  1. SKILLS: 

ORGANISATIONAL SKILLS: when working alongside studying, you need to be able to organise your time and your work accordingly. This can be difficult as you have different priorities, but you need to manage your time, some people find doing school work on the weekdays and working weekends easier. If you are lucky you may have flexible shifts and a workplace that understands your workload so may be able to offer your hours accordingly

TEAMWORK: you will most likely be working in a team and from this experience, you will be well equipped to deal with a variety of people and personalities.

DEALING WITH PROBLEMS: you may be faced with something unexpected and something you weren’t trained for; these experiences will give the initiative to deal with things that may not go according to plan. They are also good talking points during interviews.

Having a part-time job will expose you to an array of situations and people, you may not have dealt with before. Recruiters will see that you have practical skills in the real world, you learn to interact with people and develop more skills than you could imagine!

0

Guest blog: Why I chose to take a Professional Doctorate in Health Psychology (DPsych) by Kiran Bains

Kiran Bains is taking a professional Doctorate in Health Psychology (DPsych) and she also works for City’s Careers Service as an Applications Adviser. 

About me:

Like most people, it turns out, on my undergraduate psychology course I started off wanting to be a clinical psychologist. Then I went into my final year, where we got to choose which modules we want to take and I took one in health psychology, and it grabbed my interest. I wouldn’t say that going into the DPsych Health was like a romance novel, this is ‘the one’ for me, but health psychology was a field that interested me a great deal. It seemed to be ‘global’; the interplay of physical, social and to a point, mental health. It’s also relatively newer, so I felt a greater sense of opportunity to put my stamp on it in a wider context and make an impact. And finally, I was introduced to critical health psychology, which helped me think about how health and identities are constructed, and how the way we make meaning of these topics can feed into social inequalities.

My career journey

I did not rush into this career choice, but my path has been like a series of stepping stones where I decided on each move as it came. I volunteered at university for the Epilepsy Society and , then worked with them as support worker after graduation. I then moved laterally to work with people with learning disabilities (there was an overlap with my clients). I found myself rethinking a lot of what I took for granted, around topics such as their communication and understanding, as this varied so widely. This helped me think critically when I did my masters in health psychology, and have an end purpose in using and applying my knowledge. After my masters I worked as a research assistant in a diabetes screening and prevention project aimed at adults with learning disabilities. I also did some work in LGBT research, and both of these areas informed parts of my training for my doctorate. It’s easier to understand social inequalities when you work with disadvantaged minority groups. Before I applied for my doctorate, however, I went back to the social care organisation I spent a significant amount of time working for on and off for several years, Continue Reading