New books – March 2020

We are adding new books to our collections every month. Use the carousel below to browse a diverse selection of the new titles added between January and March 2020 . Click on any cover to see where the book is located or to place a request.

Want to recommend a book? Tell us what’s missing from our collections via our More Books, Read for Research or Liberating City schemes. 

 

Library Staff Love #17: City Novel / City Crime

Our students studying for an MA in Creative Writing are a super talented bunch and benefit from a sector leading course which has led to graduates becoming successful and award-winning published authors.

You can get a flavour of their creativity by reading City Novel and City Crime: brilliant collections of their stories available in the Library, so brilliant in fact that they’re the subject of our latest Staff Pick submitted by an enthusiastic, anonymous colleague:

“They’ve only gone and done it again! City’s talented writers have knuckled down and created some fresh, raw and revealing fiction. I just love to read new books and these collected excerpts are all brilliant. They really whet the appetite for more.

The City Crime books are all full of spooky whodunnits and the City Novel books are all just full of great novels. It’s like a little bonsai library. Just perfect.”

Librarians are known for knowing their fiction so you can’t go wrong with a recommendation from one, including from our very own mystery author. You can pick up copies of City Novel and City Crime from Level 5 of the Northampton Square Library today.

(We’d love to hear your reviews or recommendations: @CityUniLibrary)

Library staff’s favourite summer reads

Summer’s all about finding a good book, a nice patch of sun, and relaxing. Well that and a few other things, but either way the library loves curling up with a good book.

Here’s a list of the favourite books of members of library staff including some great beach reads and airport novels. Enjoy.

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Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy  by Douglas Adams
“I loved a bit of this. Adam’s world is total escapism, very readable on grass, sand or airport lounge.”

 

Strange Heart Beating by Eli Goldstone
“A brilliant book that explores so much of what makes us what we are. A revelation.”

 

In Parenthesis by David Jones
“One of the greatest works to come out of the twentieth century. A densely wrought masterpiece that rewards several re-readings. :)”

 

Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
“What’s not to like about Jane? She gets stuff done and she does not let herself be cowed: “I am no bird; and no net ensnares me. I am a free human being with an independent will.””

 

Life on air: Memoir’s of a broadcaster by David Attenborough
Catherine says, “I am engrossed in this. I’m listening to it as an audio book and just lurvve his voice, but his journey is so engaging and so much more than the animal documentaries we all know and love.”

 

On The Beach by Nevil Shute
Lynn is a big fan of this. She says “More of a nuclear summer? I read this at a young age. Characters carried on regardless in the sweltering heat as I realised, to my horror, they were all doomed.  Scarier than any Pan Book of Horror!”

 

Puberty Blues by Kathy Lette and Gabrielle Carey
“It’s set in Sydney in Australia in the late 70’s and is about a group of teenagers ‘coming of age’. It’s not really my favourite book, but it and the movie always give me a good laugh for being so cheesy and kitsch.”

 

A Suitable Boy by Vikram Seth
“Entertaining but informs the reader of the culture of the times and the history of partition.”

 

The Bible
Catherine says this “is my handbook for life. It gives me wisdom, encouragement, inspiration and words of love that lift my spirit. It is always in my mind and heart and never far from my hand.”

 

The Moonstone by Wilkie Collins
Alex loves this book. He says it’s “a great mystery with some wonderful characters. Engrossing.”

 

The Neapolitan by Elena Ferrante
Catie recommends reading these books this summer. She says “they don’t all take place in the summertime, but in Book 2, most of it takes place on a beach in Italy. It’s scandalous, salacious and influences all subsequent books.”

 

The portrait of the Artist as a young man by James Joyce
“Portrait was challenging conventional ways of writing and long held beliefs and traditions. As an aspiring artist in those days, that’s what I wanted to do as well.  “

 

The Summer Book by Tove Jansson
“It’s about the love and friendship between a girl and her artist grandmother while they spend the summer together on the Swedish archipelago. It’s about freedom, nature and death and is beautifully written.”

 

I Capture the Castle by Dodie Smith
This book sums up summer reading for Samantha. “A beautiful coming of age story about a literary young woman in privileged yet difficult circumstances falling in love, and choosing not to lose her head. It’s wonderfully written, the characters are captivating, and you get a lovely sense of endless English summer.

“I confess it also reminds me of my teenage summers in the countryside, especially as a friend had a very similar house. We had cars though, which did make the meeting of suitable and unsuitable boys much easier!  (Dodie Smith also wrote another much more famous work: 101 Dalmations.)”

 

The Waste Land  by TS Eliot
“It’s got so many literary illusions – you could DEDICATE your whole life to studying it.”

 

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
“The atmosphere of a sleepy Southern town; you just get so sucked in. Kids looking for an adventure over the summer. Compelling, moving and very easy to read.”

 

VALIS by Philip K Dick
“PKD at his best. It got everything: libraries, mind expansion and the grail myth. A real stonker of a book”.

 

Wide Sargasso Sea by Jean Rhys
Fanfic before there was even an internet to be a fanperson on? This book “expands and presents a very different view of Jane Eyre, illuminating it with the dark side of the British Empire”.

 

Anything by MJ Arlidge
One member of staff said he got into these books after they were recommended to him by Director of Library Services.

 

Bonjour Tristesse by Françoise Sagan
Chosen twice.  One member of staff said he likes it because it reminds him of a year spent in Paris and the South of France which he described as “smashing”. Another member of staff said “I just remember a lot of it being on a beach and it was quite evocative”.

 

Eleanor of Aquitaine
“Eleanor of Aquitaine was the baddasserest queen to ever badass. She married two kings and birthed two more, and outlived all but one, always making sure to run her own Aquitinian estates perfectly whilst fighting off all sorts of ne’erdo wells and having five equally badass daughters. She shaped the 12th century, and with it, western Europe.”

 

 

What do you think of our recommendations? Have we missed anything? Tell us in the comments below.

Your Top 10 Films of All Time..!

With the 89th Academy Awards on Sunday the end credits will roll on another year of tearful acceptance speeches, surprising snubs and red-carpet wardrobe disasters. To mark the occasion we’ve crunched the numbers on our DVD collection to discover your most popular movies based on usage.

Here are your all-time top ten. The results might surprise you…

10: The Godfather: Part II (1974)

Does it prove the theory that sequels are always better than the originals (Aliens, The Empire Strikes Back) and that third instalments are always much, much worse than their predecessors (Godfather: Part III, Superman III, Richard III…)? The Godfather: Part II certainly took your Marlon Brando, raised you Robert De Niro, and walked off with 6 Oscars including Best Picture.

9: Maria Full of Grace (2004)

Catalina Sandeno Moreno was nominated for the Best Actress Oscar at the 77th Academy Awards for her performance as a Colombian teenager who gets pregnant and then winds up becoming a drug mule. She also won Best Actress (Silver Bear) at the Berlin Film Festival where the movie was nominated for the Golden Bear. Seriously, the Golden & Silver Bears. Brilliant.

8: Being John Malkovich (1999)

Nominated for 3 Oscars, the film stars John Cusack, Cameron Diaz, Catherine Keener and of course the eponymous Mr Malkovich himself and is about, well, people getting inside someone’s head. Literally. It’s probably easier to watch than to describe.

7: Naked (1993)

Legendary filmmaker Mike Leigh’s film was overlooked by the Academy, but was recognised at a wide range of other ceremonies and film festivals worldwide, including at Cannes where it scooped Best Director and Best Actor for David Thewlis. Described as a comedy-drama, its adult content and themes means it’s, well, not for faint-hearted; and there’s not a cheesy-pineapple stick in sight.

6: Amélie (2001)

This French romantic comedy, directed by Jean-Pierre Jeunet, is definitely at the more joie de vivre end of the cinematic spectrum, and delighted audiences mondialement back in 2001. The story about a girl whose mission in life is helping others to be happy earned itself 5 Academy Award nominations, but sadly went home empty-handed.

5: Goodbye Lenin! (2003)

Set against a backdrop of the collapse of the Berlin Wall, this German film about a young man pretending to his unwell mother that East Germany still exists was lauded at award ceremonies pretty much everywhere except the Oscars, and lost out at the BAFTAs in the Best Film Not In the English Language category.

4: This is England (2006)

Shane Meadows’ take on skinheads living in 80s Britain helped launch the careers of several British actors including Stephen Graham, picked up the Alexander Korda Award for Best British Film at the BAFTAs and spawned several television sequels. Nothing at the Oscars though, despite posting positive critical reviews stateside.

3: When Harry Met Sally (1989)

“Can men and women ever just be friends?” That’s the key question in this classic Rob Reiner rom-com written by Nora Ephron (who picked-up the film’s only Oscar nomination for her screenplay). With charming performances by a cast including Meg Ryan, Billy Crystal and the late Carrie Fisher, even the curmudgeonliest individual will want what they’re having after 96 minutes.

2: Manhattan (1979)

Neurotic writer? Check. Awkward romantic entanglements? Check. Diane Keaton? Check. The ‘overrated’ Meryl Streep thrown in for good measure? Indeed. Despite winning Best Film at the BAFTAs Woody Allen’s classic didn’t even get shortlisted at the Oscars, with the Academy only nominating it for Screenplay and Best Supporting Actress (Mariel Hemingway): it won neither.

and, at number one…

1: Adaptation (2002)

4 Oscar nominations (including one for Meryl Streep), 1 win (Best Actor in a Supporting Role: Chris Cooper) and a whole host of other awards, Charlie Kaufman’s film is about a writer hired to adapt a book for the screen. Oh, and that writer happens to be Charlie Kaufman, who wrote Being John Malkovich (see, no.8)

The Curious Case of Library Staff Love #14

Rather excitingly, and in typical crime fiction fashion, this month we received an anonymous tip-off. It seems that there’s something worth investigating on Level 5 of the Northampton Square Library and, luckily for us, our unnamed online-form-filler left some vital clues to help us take a closer look:

Clue 1: “It’s got loads of great new contemporary writings and photos.”

Hmm, how mysterious. Could it be an online resource? We’ve got so many, including LION– but you don’t need to be on Level 5 to access our e-resources, you can do that from anywhere with an internet connection. No, it must be something else…

Clue 2: “You can just curl up with a big Galaxy bar and sail away to loads of different worlds.”

Hmm, well I know that Bloomberg (available on PCs in the Financial Resources Suite) does a cool thing with little ships, but I don’t think it’s that. What does Clue 3 say…

Clue 3: “It is a great way to discover new writers. You can pick the most recent copies up from Level 5 although our collection goes back to 1979.”

Ah, I think I can see where this is going. Recent copies? A longer back catalogue? I’m thinking Journals, of which we have many in both print and digital form. But which one could it be? It must in print as we were told to look at Level 5. Let’s look at the final clue…

Clue 4: “It publishes work from a lot of hot new things including work by one of our talented alumnae: ‘Strange Heart Beating’ by Eli Goldstone will be published in June 2017 and then be available from all good bookshops and libraries.”

Aha! Time for a little process of elimination: if I Google ‘Strange Heart Beating by Eli Goldstone’ I get a results list, and the top result says Granta has bought the rights to this book. Now, maybe, if look for Granta on CityLibrary Search… huzzah! I can see that we stock… Granta Magazine!

Now, if I head to Level 5 and inspect the scene carefully…

Granta Magazine, on Level 5 of Northampton Square Library

Mystery solved! Us Librarians, we do love a bit of sleuthing. Thanks anonymous tip-off person!

Library Staff Love #12: Drama Online

Here at CityLibrary we love drama. Not in a soap opera style showdown-in-the-Staff-Room kind of way, that never happens- no cups of tea have even been spilled in a fit of pique.

No, by drama I mean proper drama- plays, playwrights, the RSC, the Almeida; texts, criticism, performance and review. Only the other day one of my colleagues mentioned she had tickets to see Glenda Jackson as King Lear, which sparked a conversation about the wonders of live theatre, the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse and seeing Angela Lansbury live on Broadway.

drama-online
Drama Online

A love of drama is what led to this month’s Library Staff Love feature, as suggested by one of our Subject Librarians Catherine, who herself is no stranger to treading the boards.

Catherine’s pick this month is Drama Online and here’s why:

“It’s such a great resource to find plays and scenes for performance/rehearsals/workshops. It’s fairly easy to use and allows you to specify the genre and cast size or you can browse through the plays or playwrights and find works that way. Some plays / productions have a video recording you can watch (Shakespeare – Globe on Screen – is my fave!) if you prefer a bit of an escape from reading.”

As Catherine suggests, as well as a vast and ever expanding collection of texts, Drama Online also features multimedia content too. So whether you’re looking for inspiration, materials for your Arts research, or merely interested in learning more about your favourite works, access to Drama Online is just an IT Username and Password away.

(Thanks for your recommendation Catherine!)

Library Staff Love #5: Naxos

Nigh_view_of_beach_of_Naxos_island,_GreeceWith Easter approaching, what better way to enjoy the bank holiday weekend than taking time out to visit the beautiful Greek island of Naxos? With its picturesque Mediterranean setting, gorgeous food and…

Oh, wait, sorry. Let me start this post again….*

With Easter approaching, what better way to enjoy the bank holiday weekend than taking time to enjoy the fantastic resource that is Naxos Music Library?

Greek Taverna

Naxos Music Library has been nominated by Stephen who describes it as a “resource with a huge variety of classical, world, film and jazz music to listen to” and is available to students (and staff) by logging-in via CityLibrary Search, or our Library Guide for Music.

So why is Stephen such a big fan?

“I use this resource of classical, world, film and jazz music recordings constantly. It is obviously a fantastic study resource (I wish there had been something like it when I was studying music!), but it is equally great for someone like myself who likes exploring different recordings of classical music, or for someone who is new to classical (or other types of) music and can have the opportunity to explore a wide range of different sorts of music within the genres.”

So inspired by Stephen’s enthusiasm for Naxos Music Library, I’ve just done a quick search for ‘Greece Traditional’ and have come across a delightful album called ‘Greek taverna’. With the mellifluous sounds of bouzouki washing over me, and the public domain picture above, all I need now is for a little sunshine and it’ll be just like being on vacation…Bouzouki music on Naxos

Thanks for the suggestion Stephen!

(*We’re sure the island of Naxos is lovely btw., it’s just that it’s not a Library resource, my mistake…)

Resource of the month – World Bank eLibrary

What is the World Bank eLibrary?

The World Bank eLibrary offers quick and easy access to nearly 9,000 World Bank books, reports, journals and working papers published since early 1990’s.

The Word Bank eLibrary is a very useful resource to find information on global issues such as development policy, climate change and poverty; it covers a broad range of subjects:  

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How can I use it?

You can browse or use the Quick and Advance search option to search for a specific book title or a topic. 

The landing page, always displays the list of the most recent books, journal articles and working papers added to the World Bank eLibrary

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You can view if the book has been mentioned on social media, and link to the blog post or tweet, and view a geographical and demographical breakdown of the tweeters.

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Looking for data?  The eLibrary’s data collection contains 54 of the most popular World Development Indicators.  You can search for data by regions or by indicators.  You can select the years you require and save them in a spreadsheet.

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World Bank eLibary, highligts and features at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s6GLU4sF3Co and video tutorials at http://elibrary.worldbank.org/page/using_elib

Where can I access it? 

Find the link to the World Bank eLibrary in the A-Z list of databases http://libguides.city.ac.uk/az.php?a=w , then access with your IT username and password