Stay up-to-date with The FT.com and The Economist

Do want to keep up with the news but don’t know where to start? Are you interested in politics, business or international relations? Then City Library can help you! You can access the best in international news, analysis and comment from our subscriptions to the Financial Times (FT) and The Economist.

The FT.com

Every student at City gets their very own FT account, which gives access to the entire site, including apps for phones and tablets, up-to-date news and information and all the FT’s articles. All you need to do is register. Don’t worry if you’re not interested in finance – the FT also includes commentary on politics, economics and the arts.

Financial Times

Registering for the FT.com:

Step 1: Go to www.ft.com and select Sign In

Step 2: Enter your City email address and select Next

Step 3: Select SSO Sign in and enter City username and password e.g. abcd123

Step 4: Complete the registration form. Make sure you use your City email address. Accept the terms and conditions and select continue.

Step 5: You will receive an email at your City account from the FT. To complete setting up your account, you need to set up a password. Follow the prompt in the email to do this.

 

The Economist

The Economist’s primary focus is world events, politics and business, but it also runs regular sections on science and technology, as well as books and the arts.  City Library’s subscription to The Economist.com includes access to the current print edition online and previous editions going back to 1997.

The Economist

Access The Economist.com via the Databases A-Z list. Once on the webpage ignore any links asking you to log in or subscribe – you have access to the full site courtesy of City Library!

If you have any questions about either the FT or The Economist you can contact library@city.ac.uk.

 

 

 

New databases: EIU Country Data and EIU Market Indicators and Forecasts

We are pleased to introduce two new databases to our collection: EIU Country Data and EIU Market Indicators and Forecasts. These databases have widespread applications across the disciplines, including Economics and Journalism.

EIU Country Data is an economic indicators database covering 200 countries and 45 regional aggregates. Global in coverage, EIU Country Data includes forecasts, external trade and GDP going back as far as 1980. It can be used to research individual counties in detail or to compare criteria across regions.

 

EIU Market Indicators and Forecasts is an economic database with industry data covering 60 countries dating back to 1990. Global in coverage, EIU Market Indicators and Forecasts also includes economic and industry forecasts for the next five years.

Other databases with detailed economics data can only be accessed on site with a specialist username and password. However, EIU Country Data and EIU Market Indicators and Forecasts can be accessed from anywhere with your City username and password.

If you have any questions about using these databases please get in touch with Catie Tuttle or Samantha Halford.

The Annual Register: a record of world events

The Annual Register is a year-by-year record of British and world events, published annually since 1758.

From 1758 to 1789, Edmund Burke was the editor and main contributor to this publication.  The Annual Register, as well as being a record of events, used to include reviews of important books, reproduction of state papers, historical sketches, poetry and observations on natural history.

After 1775, the history section of the Annual Register increased significantly and became the main focus of the publication.  In the 1920s, the content of the Annual Register changed to the format that it is still used today, opening with the history of Britain, followed by a section on foreign history, then chronicles of events, a brief retrospective of the year’s cultural and economic developments, and obituaries of esteemed people who died in the year.

City, University of London Library provides access to the online version of the Annual Register, which includes each volume published since 1758.

Screenshot of Annual Register published in 1946

 

The Annual Register is a valuable source of information for History, International Politics and Journalism students.

You can browse the different volumes of the publication, check the table of content and open the PDF of the relevant chapter.  Alternatively enter your keywords to retrieve all the documents, included in the Annual Register, that focus on the topic of your research.

Annual Register - basic search page

 

 

Introducing World-Check Country Risk Ranking

The database World-Check Country Risk Ranking from Thomson Reuters is now available for use inside the library.

What does it do?

World-Check Country Risk Ranking provides a current ranking of countries based on political, economic and criminal factors from hundreds of independent sources and international organisations, including the World Bank, Financial Action Task Force, OECD and World Economic Forum.

World-Check Country Risk Ranking screenshot
World-Check Country Risk Ranking screenshot

Risk factors include:
• Type of governance
• Political stability
• Armed conflict
• Human Rights
• GDP
• Debt
• Credit Sovereign Ratings
• Fraud
• Human trafficking
• Corruption

World-Check Country Ranking risk factors breakdown
World-Check Country Ranking risk factors breakdown

Ranking is updated when new source material is published. Ratings are transparent and linked directly to their sources.

World-Check Country Risk Ranking risk factors
Political factors

 

How can we get access it?

World-Check Country Risk Ranking can be accessed on networked computers at Northampton Square Library or Cass Learning Resource Centre. Users should ask at the helpdesk to get access. Please note only one user at a time can access it at each site.
Questions about World-Check Country Risk Ranking can be directed to Samantha Halford (samantha.halford.1@city.ac.uk) or Catie Tuttle (catie.tuttle.1@city.ac.uk).

Charlton Heston, Vietnam and the NUS Grants Campaign

City has a long tradition of its student publications featuring strong and politically charged editorials stretching right back to its founding as the Northampton Institute in the 1890s.

Take this edition of Beacon from May, 1968 as an example:

Black and white front cover of The Beacon, May 1968, featuring the headline 'Vietnam No'
Beacon Front Cover, May 1968

The front cover features a quote from a Royal Shakespeare Company production of a play called ‘US’, used to help illustrate the publication’s anti-Vietnam War stance: and there is a two-page spread inside on pages 6 and 7 which deals with some of the issues involved in the conflict, including examining some of the facts behind the headlines.

But arguably it’s the Editorial which is most interesting. It talks about the dehumanising aspect of war and how it can be easy to forget that it’s not organisations or countries fighting or being bombed, but people- human beings affecting the lives of others. It also talks about the impact of geography on how we understand and interpret events, suggesting that because a country like Vietnam is so far away people don’t see it as having much impact on their lives and so care less about the war and more about what are, by contrast, trivial matters local to them, commenting that “sometimes we should perhaps remember that there is a world outside.”

The piece concludes with a rather stark assessment of the political climate and a hint at the dangers of apathy which often prevails on such matters:

“Thus we look at the gathering storm of protest. The songs, the speeches, the banners. We try and stir the conscience. Not just because a baby was burnt to a cinder by napalm yesterday, but because we let it happen.”

This powerful statement demonstrates the importance of giving voice to people and facilitating freedom of speech and expression, even during the most challenging of times: and how local journalism, including student newspapers, have often provided such an opportunity.

In the classic tradition of tabloid newspapers and The One Show though, the Beacon did like to offer its readers a lively mix of politics, Union society updates and photos of students being silly. In addition, there was regular content such as these film reviews featuring the Charlton Heston classic Planet of the Apes, although evidently the concept of ‘Spoiler Alert’ wasn’t a thing back then:

 

Film reviews from Beacon including for the film Planet of the Apes, May 1968
Beacon Film Reviews, May 1968

 

Finally, from this edition, there’s some handy guidance on how to write a letter to your local MP to complain about the cost of going to university and advocate to back the proposals of the NUS campaign for better student grants- although it’s not clear if the Secretariat covered the costs of stamps as well…

 

A letter template from Beacon in May 1968
Guide to Writing to Your Local MP, Beacon May 1968

From the archive: The Beacon

The Archives Group at City Library are responsible for maintaining and preserving City’s Archives and Special Collections. We are currently working on a number of exciting projects to make the content more accessible to staff, students and external researchers.

In our new series From the archive, each month we’ll be selecting a collection from the archive to share with the world via the News Hub. This month it’s the turn of the beloved student magazine The Beacon. Edited and written entirely by students we hold print runs of The Beacon from the late 1940s until the early 1980s.

The Beacon provides a fascinating insight into the lives of City students throughout this period; the things which were important to them at the time and local political issues of the day. We can also see the activities of the student’s union reflected in the pages, with concerts, theatre productions, dances and sports all recorded or advertised.  

If you would like to find out more about City’s Archives and Special collections please visit our Archives Guide or email archives@city.ac.uk. 

Get the PressReader app for your phone or tablet

Download the PressReader app to access your favourite news and magazine titles on the move. This includes over 7,000 newspapers and magazines from 97 countries in 54 languages in full colour, full page format.

PressReader offers offsite access to the platform on your mobile device, courtesy of City Library. This means that registered library users can use the PressReader app remotely for 7 days before they have to authenticate again by connecting their device to the City Wi-Fi network.

Step by step instructions for setting up the app – must be completed on site

Step 1:  Log on to PressReader via the Library website using the following link: http://libguides.city.ac.uk/pressreader. The website normally takes around 60s to load, so don’t worry if it seems slow. 

Step 2: Once loaded click on the menu bar next to the green coffee cup in the top left hand corner of the screen. Select ‘Sign in’ 

Then select ‘Sign up now’

Register for a free account using your City email address.

Step 3: Using your phone or tablet go to the App Store to download the most recent PressReader app. Once downloaded sign in with the login details you’ve just created. You should then see the notice that publications are brought to your by the Library –City University of London.

Like all apps, PressReader will use data from your mobile network plan unless you connect over a WI-FI network. Average monthly usage for PressReader is between 200MB and 400BM. 

If you have any questions about PressReader or the app please contact alexandra.asman.1@city.ac.uk or library@city.ac.uk 

New Resource: New York Times Archive

Library Services now provides access to the  New York Times Archive 1851-2013. The newspaper which has won more Pulitzer Prizes than any other title, covers both US and international news, politics, science, technology and the arts.

Nixon NYT1929 CrashObama

As well as offering full –text page images, the archive is integrated with the New York Times Index which allows searches to be targeted by subject, location, person, and organisation/company.

 

To access New York Times articles from 2014 onwards use Nexis UK or Factiva.

Browse our other historical newspaper databases on our Newspapers guide.

Access

Logon to the New York Times Archive via the A-Z Database list or City Library Search.

Support

Contact your Subject or Research Librarian if you need any help using this resource.

Ms Setsuko Thurlow visits City

Last Week City was privileged to host Ms Setsuko Thurlow who discussed her experiences in Hiroshima in 1945.

Ms Setsuko Thurlow was in the UK to receive the Ahmadiyya Muslim Prize for the Advancement of Peace on Saturday. A Canadian citizen, she has previously received the Order of Canada Medal, the highest honour for Canadian civilians and has been nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize. A survivor of one of the most pivotal events in modern history, Setsuko has displayed enormous courage and leadership throughout her long life, sharing her atomic bomb experiences in order to inform people about the real consequences of nuclear war. The audience at City were deeply moved and honoured to hear her story.

As a 13-year old schoolgirl, Setsuko found herself pressed into action by the Japanese Imperial Army to decode secret messages. Her first official day of work, with about 30 other high school students, was set for August 6th 1945. Just as Major Yanai gave the girls their marching orders, Sestsuko remembers a blueish white flash and a force of wind that lifted her body skyward. She would later regain consciousness in close proximity to ground zero of the world’s first atomic blast used in war. Her beloved city of Hiroshima was destroyed by a single ‘bomb’ nicknamed Little Boy.

 

A photo of Hiroshima

 

You may hear more about nuclear disarmament in the news this week. On Monday the UN will host a conference which aims to negotiate a “legally binding instrument to prohibit nuclear weapons, leading towards their total elimination”. This follows a vote in October 2016 when 123 nations voted in favour of holding this conference against 38 nations who were opposed (including the United Kingdom, Russia and North Korea). Campaigners, including Setsuko, feel positive that this conference will finally see this evil consigned to the history books.

You can read more about Hiroshima and nuclear war through CityLibrary Search.